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Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe HYNE

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Surname: HYNE

Forename(s): Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe

Place of Birth: Bradford, Yorkshire

Service No: ---

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Irish Guards

Battalion / Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: Guards Division

Age: 18

Date of Death: 1916-11-21

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: South of South porch of Church.

CWGC Cemetery: KETTLEWELL (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: KETTLEWELL, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe Hyne was the son of Charles John Cutcliffe Wright and Mary Elizabeth Hyne, née Haggas. Charles, senior, was born at Bibury, Gloucestershire and Mary at Oakworth, Yorkshire.

1901 Bradford, Yorkshire Census: 1, Oak Villas - Charles G. Hyne, aged 3 years, born Bradford, son of Charles J. and Mary E. Hyne.

1911 Bradford, Yorkshire Census: Heaton Lodge - Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe Hyne, aged 13 years, born Bradford. [Charles's parents were away from home.]

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: 2/Lt Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe Hyne, Irish Guards attd Trench Mortar Battery. Correspondence: Father - C.J. Cutcliffe Hyne, Esq. Kettlewell, by Skipton.

Charles is commemorated in the 'City of Bradford Great War 1914-1918 Roll of Honour'.

A short biography of Charles is included in: ‘Swaledale & Wharfedale Remembered - Aspects of Dales’ life through peace and war’ by Keith Taylor (2006).

See also: https://www.bradfordgrammar.com/former-pupils/bradford-grammar-school-in-ww1/

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

KETTLEWELL

HYNE, Lieutenant C.G. Cutcliffe, aged 18, Irish Guards, only son of Mr. C.J. Cutcliffe Hyne, the well-known novelist of Kettlewell, died from wounds Sept. 15, 1916, aged 18 years.

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Lieutenant Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe HYNE

Lieutenant Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe HYNE

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Irish Guards

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Irish Guards

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: Guards Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: Guards Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HYNE

Forename(s): Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: Lt

Regiment: Irish Guards

Battalion: 2nd Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 21/11/16

Died How: Died of wounds

Theatre of War:

Notes: (Att T M B)

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HYNE

Forename(s): Charles Godfrey H. Cutcliffe

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment: Irish Guards

Unit: 2nd Bn.

Age: 18

Awards:

Died Date: 21/11/1916

Additional Information: Son of C. J. Cutcliffe-Hyne, of Heaton Lodge, Bradford, and Kettlewell.

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1917

HYNE Charles Godfrey Haggas Cutcliffe of Heaton Lodge Bradford a lieutenant in the Irish Guards died 21 November 1916 at 22 Park-lane Middlesex while on active service Administration Wakefield 25 January to Charles John Cutliffe Wright Hyne gentleman. Effects £209 14s 6d.

1944

HYNE Charles John Cutcliffe Wright of Damside House Kettlewell Skipton Yorkshire died 10 March 1944 Probate Wakefield 25 October to Mildred Nancy Cutliffe Hyne spinster Donald Gardner Hopewell solicitor and Denis Anderton Brigg medical practitioner. Effects £17356 6s. 10d.

Bradford Grammar School in WW1

CHARLES GODFREY HAGGAS CUTCLIFFE HYNE

1898-1916 Aged 18

Lieutenant. 2nd Battalion Irish Guards, attached Trench Mortar Battery.

Charles Godfrey Hyne was the only son of Charles John Cutcliffe Hyne of Heaton Hall, Bradford and Damside House, Kettlewell. He was born in Bradford early in 1898. The family arrived in Bradford in 1868 when the Reverend Charles Wright Noble Hyne became vicar of Bierley. He sent his son Charles John to Bradford Grammar School, who later described it as ‘a beastly place’. He then went to Clare College, Cambridge, before becoming a ‘hack-writer’ and an adventurer. His literary career was transformed when it was suggested that he turn a minor character from one of his stories, Captain Kettle, into the subject of serialized stories. This character made Cutcliffe Hyne a well known novelist, who influenced Conrad’s ‘Heart of Darkness’, and other of whose books are reckoned the superior of Conan Doyle’s non-Sherlock Holmes novels. In February 1897 he married ‘Elsie’ (Mary Elizabeth) Haggas, the daughter of a wealthy worsted manufacturer from Oakworth, and their only son Charles Godfrey was born early the next year.

In his works C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne expressed his ‘contempt for weaklings and whiners, and belief in hard work and the salutary effect of the school of hard knocks.’ This may give an insight into the up-bringing his son Godfrey received. Despite his father’s opinion of Bradford Grammar School, he went there from 1908 until 1911, from the ages of ten to thirteen. In Form Second Lower he was 15th of 30; in Second Classical Upper he came 27th of 32; in his final year, in Third Classical, his best subjects were English, History, Science and Latin, while he was near the bottom in Maths, Geography and Divinity. In September 1911, Godfrey went to Rugby School where he boarded in St. Hill’s house (now Michell’s). He played rugby football for his house and was seen as ‘good in the scrum’ - he won his only cap as a forward against Uppingham in 1915. In the O.T.C. he displayed his leadership qualities and was rapidly promoted, to Corporal, then to Second Lieutenant in May 1915. A school-fellow wrote:- ‘I know how proud we all were to be commanded by him. He got hold of us as few boys can of their fellows in a corps of that sort, and raised our House from the bottom to the top of the list in the competitions. There is not a man who has ever worked under him who will not feel his loss most acutely.’

From Rugby School Godfrey was commissioned into the 2nd Battalion Irish Guards in February 1916. He went to France in May, and was posted to No.2 Company in mid-July as the battalion prepared to move from Ypres to the Somme. At the end of August he was promoted to Lieutenant and attached to the Brigade of Guards Trench Mortar Battery. On 15th September he was supporting the battalion’s advance to the north-east of Ginchy. Seventeen out of twenty-five of his Trench Mortar crews were killed or wounded. He was fetching ammunition himself, as nobody else had managed to get through, when he was shot in the thigh by a sniper. He saved his guns, although the other mortars in the Battery were lost. He was evacuated back to London, to the Park Lane home of the Hon. Mrs. F. Guest, which was in use as a Military Hospital, and it was reported in the Bradford newspapers that he was ‘severely wounded.’ He died on 21st November, and his body was brought to Kettlewell where he was buried in the churchyard on the 25th with military honours. His Colonel wrote of him:- ’He was regarded with sincere affection by his brother Officers, and he always did his duty splendidly.’ Another officer wrote:- ‘He was truly an excellent fellow and as brave as a lion.’ A Sergeant in his Company, who was wounded the same day, said:- ‘He was as fearless and tactful as he was popular in the Regiment.’ The east window in Kettlewell Church is his memorial. He is also on the Memorial Lych Gate at St. John’s Church, Bierley, Bradford. His only sister ‘Nan’ lived at Kettlewell until her death in 1999.

Acknowledgements:

This photo is from an anonymously-compiled scrapbook of press-cuttings of young men from Bradford killed in the First World War, several of whom were at B.G.S. (Bradford Local Studies Library - my thanks to Jennie Kiff for bringing it to my notice). For C. J. Cutcliffe-Hyne, see (from which the quotation is taken) and < http://www.collectingbooksandmagazines.com/ hyne.html> accessed 6-11-2016. The Hyne family history was researched using Ancestry.com. Charles’s years at B.G.S. were researched in the B.G.S. Annual Reports for 1909-1911—The Bradfordian stated he was at the School 1903-1911, but his first appearance is in the midsummer 1909 Report. I am very grateful to Rusty MacLean of Rugby School archives, and to Tim Day, of Machell’s house, for their kind assistance. The tributes to Charles Hyne are quoted from the Rugby School magazine. The description of his death features in both that publication and in Craven’s Part in the Great War (Skipton, 1919), 62. The 2/Irish Guards War Diary for 1916 is not available on Ancestry; Rudyard Kipling’s The Irish Guards in the Great War, edited and compiled from their diaries and papers. Vol. II The Second Battalion (London, 1923), can be consulted at accessed 7-11-2016; Hyne joined his battalion in May 1916, the account of which commences on p.74, Hyne’s wounding noted on p.108. The photo of the east window was taken by the author. The photo of This biography was researched and compiled by Nick Hooper, November 2016 ([email protected]).

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ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

Entry on Page 24

St Mary's Churchyard, Kettlewell

St Mary's Churchyard, Kettlewell

CWGC private memorial

St Mary's Churchyard, Kettlewell

St Mary's Churchyard, Kettlewell

CWGC private memorial - detail

Bradford Grammar School War Memorial

Bradford Grammar School War Memorial

© Nicholas Hooper (WMR-28454)

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Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

24 November 1916

CUTCLIFFE HYNE – 21st November, 1916, at 26, Park Lane, London. Lieutenant G. C. H. Cutcliffe Hyne, of the Irish Guards, from wounds received in the Guards’ charge, 15th September, only son of Mr. C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne, of Kettlewell.

24 November 1916

ONLY SON OF MR. CUTCLIFFE HYNE KILLED

The inhabitants of Craven will learn with deep regret of the death of Lieutenant G.C.H. Cutcliffe Hyne, of the Irish Guards, which took place in London on Tuesday from wounds received in action on September 15th. He was the only son of Mr. C.J. Cutcliffe Hyne, the well-known novelist, of Kettlewell, and was in his nineteenth year. When war broke out he was at Rugby School, and joined the Officers’ Training Corps there. Granted a commission in the Irish Guards, he joined his regiment at the front in April. Promoted to the trench mortar battery, he figured in a notable deed of gallantry which resulted in the saving of all his guns and in the capture of seventeen out of twenty five of the enemy. Lieutenant Cutcliffe Hyne was wounded in a charge by the Guards on September 15th. He was conveyed to London, and nursed at the house of the Hon. Mrs. Guest, Park Lane, where he died as stated.

01 December 1916

KETTLEWELL OFFICER’S DEATH – IMPRESSIVE FUNERAL

The interment of the late Lieutenant G. C. H. Cutcliffe Hyne, of the Irish Guards, only son of Mr. G. J. Cutcliffe Hyne, the well-known Yorkshire novelist, took place with military honours at Kettlewell on Saturday. Lieut. Cutcliffe Hyne, who was in his nineteenth year, figured in a notable deed of gallantry which resulted in the saving of all his guns, but 17 men out of 25 in his gun company were knocked out. He was wounded about the middle of September, and was brought to the home of the Hon. Mrs. F. Guest, which was used as a military hospital, in Park Lane, London, where he remained for about nine weeks. About three weeks ago it was found necessary to amputate the right leg in the hope of saving his life, but the poison had obtained such a hold of the system that it proved too much for his strength, and on Tuesday evening, November 21st, at 6-30, he passed away.

It is thirteen years since Mr. Cutcliffe Hyne obtained his Kettlewell property, and since that time his son had loved his home and surroundings there, so it was decided that he should find his resting place in the valley. On Friday his body was brought to Kettlewell from London and was taken into the church and rested there until the following day, after a short service which was attended by a few of the parishioners. The service at the church on Saturday at 1-15 p.m. was very largely attended. A great number of very beautiful floral tokens had been sent by a large circle of friends and had been arranged around the coffin. The Vicar, the Rev. J.W. Cockerill, took the service and the Rev. C. H. Lowe, Rector of Rylstone, the Rev. J. Leighton, Rector of Linton, were present. The War Office sent down a party of eight non-commissioned officers and two drummers under the command of Lieutenant J. M. King, together with Lieutenant Bagenal and Second Lieut. Shears, brother officers. During the service the bearers stood to attention on either side of the coffin, and after the service bore it shoulder high to the grave. On the coffin were the sword and cap of the late officer. At the close of the service the ‘Last Post’ was sounded.

The service was a very impressive one and was attended by nearly ever parishioner and many representatives of the whole of Upper Wharfedale. There was a most sincere and deep sorrow for the loss of one who had endeared himself to nearly all who had come in contact with him, and universal sympathy for his family.

04 July 1919

PEACE SUPPLEMENT TO THE 'CRAVEN HERALD' – CRAVEN'S FALLEN OFFICERS

LIEUTENANT G. C. H. CUTLIFFE HYNE

Irish Guards, only son of Mr. C. J. Cutliffe Hyne, the well-known Yorkshire novelist, died on November 21st in hospital from wounds received about the middle of September, 1916, aged 19 years.

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24 November 1916

CUTCLIFFE HYNE – November 21st, at 26 Park Lane, London, W., Lieut. G.C.H. Cutcliffe Hyne, of the Irish Guards, from wounds received in the Guard’s charge, 15th September.

24 November 1916

LIEUT. G.C.H. CUTCLIFFE HYNE

Lieutenant G.C.H. Cutcliffe Hyne, of the Irish Guards, died in London on Tuesday from wounds received in action on September 15th. He was the only son of Mr. C.J. Cutcliffe Hyne, the well-known novelist, of Heaton Lodge, Bradford, and of Kettlewell, and was in his nineteenth year. When war broke out he was at Rugby School, and joined the Officer’s Training Corps there. Granted a commission in the Irish Guards, he joined his regiment at the Front in April. Promoted to the trench mortar battery, he figured in a notable deed of gallantry, which resulted in the capture of seventeen out of twenty-five of the enemy. Lieutenant Cutcliffe Hyne was wounded in a charge by the Guards on September 15th. He was conveyed to London, and nursed at the house of the Hon. Mrs. Guest, Park Lane, where he died on Tuesday. The funeral will take place at Kettlewell.

01 December 1916

KETTLEWELL

THE LATE LIEUT. CUTCLIFFE HYNE

Funeral at Kettlewell

The interment of the late Lieutenant G. C. H. Cutcliffe Hyne, of the Irish Guards, only son of Mr. C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne, the well-known Yorkshire novelist, took place with military honours at Kettlewell on Saturday. Lieut. Cutcliffe Hyne, who was in his 19th year, figured in a notable deed of gallantry which resulted in the saving of all his guns, and in the capture of 17 out of 25 of the enemy. He was wounded about the middle of September, and up to Monday last appeared to be making good progress towards recovery, but on Tuesday he had a relapse and died.

The body was conveyed from London to Kettlewell on Friday, and was taken into the church, where it rested during the night. The service at the church on Saturday was very largely attended. The officiating ministers were Rev. J. W. Cockerill (Kettlewell), Rev. C. H. Lowe (Rylstone), and Rev. J. A. Leighton (Linton). The coffin was carried on the shoulders of ten non-commissioned officers and men of the Irish Guards, and on it were laid the late officer’s cap and sword. Three brother officers, Lieutenant Nutting, Lieutenant Bagenal, and Second Lieut. Shears, also attended. The ‘Last Post’ was sounded at the graveside.

The private mourners were Mr. and Mrs. C.J. Cutcliffe Hyne, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hyne, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Haggas, Sir J.C. Oddy, Mr. Fred Haggas, Mr. and Mrs. T. Brigg and Miss Brigg, Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Wright, Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Gibson, and Mrs. Bateson. Among personal friends who attended were Mr. Halliwell Sutcliffe, Mr. G. and Mrs. Holdsworth (Netherside Hall), Capt. and Mrs. C.P. Charlesworth, Miss Charlesworth, Mr. and Mrs. W. Gurney, Mr. W. Barnard, Mrs. Mills, Mr. and Mrs. Watson Smeeth (Ilkley), Mr. J.J. Brigg, Mrs. Cecil Sharp, Miss M.E. Weatherhead, Mrs. Lowe, Mr. H. Wiseman (Coniston), Rev. J.C. Sowerbutts (Kettlewell), Mr. Wm. Robinson, Mr. T. Leyland, Mr. F. Jowett (Grassington and Bradford), Mr. A.E. Ingham, Mr. and Mrs. Gibson, Dr. Hynes, Mrs. Tetley (Grassington), Mr. J. Benn (Burley), Mr. T.R. Renton (Bradford), and Mr. Robert Webster.

Among the floral tributes were those from ‘Father and Mother’, Mrs. Hyne, Mr. and Mrs. F. Hyne, Sir John Clough and cousins at Haincliffe, Sir Arthur and Lady Godwin and Mrs. Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. J.J. Wright, Rev. E.H. and Mrs. Wynn, the officers of the Irish Guards, his old house at Rugby, the officers at Hallfield House, London, V.A.D.S., Hallfield House, Mr. and Mrs. Halliwell Sutcliffe, the Vicar of Kettlewell and family, and Dr. and Misses Mossop.

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