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Ernest HOYLES

Main CPGW Record

Surname: HOYLES

Forename(s): Ernest

Place of Birth: Hebden, Yorkshire

Service No: 47870

Rank: L/Sergeant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Canadian Infantry

Battalion / Unit: 15th Battalion (48th Highlanders of Canada)

Division: 1st Canadian Division

Age: 30

Date of Death: 1916-06-03

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: Panel 18 - 24 - 26 - 30.

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Ernest Hoyles (born 5 June 1886) was the son of George and Alice Hoyles, née Birch and brother of Corporal George Hoyles (266968) (q.v.) and Private Richard Hoyles (34186) (q.v.). Their father was born at Hebden and mother at Grassington, Yorkshire.

1891 Hebden, Yorkshire Census: Chapel Lane - Earnest Hoyles, aged 5 years, born Hebden, son of George and Alice Hoyles.

1901 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 1, Byron Street - Ernest Hoyles, aged 15 years, born Hebden, Yorkshire, son of George and Alice Hoyles.

Ernest was married to Agnes Simpson in 1906.

Canadian service records: http://www.baclac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

HOYLES, Sgt. Ernest, aged 31, Canadian Highlanders, son of Mr. Hoyles, 15, Montgomery Street, Skipton, killed in France, 1916.

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L/Sergeant Ernest HOYLES

L/Sergeant Ernest HOYLES

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Canadian Infantry

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Canadian Infantry

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 1st Canadian Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 1st Canadian Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: No entry in SDGW - Canadian Forces.

Forename(s):

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank:

Regiment:

Battalion:

Decorations:

Died Date:

Died How:

Theatre of War:

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HOYLES

Forename(s): Ernest

Country of Service: Canadian

Service Number: 47870

Rank: Lance Sergeant

Regiment: Canadian Infantry

Unit: 15th Bn.

Age: 30

Awards:

Died Date: 03/06/1916

Additional Information: Son of George and Alice Hoyles, of Montgomery St., Skipton; husband of Agnes Thornton (formerly Hoyles), of Langroods, Bradley, Keighley, England.

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DE RUVIGNY'S ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-1918 - Part Four

HOYLES, ERNEST, Sergt., No. 47870, 15th Battn. 48th Canadian Highlanders, Canadian Expeditionary Force, s. of George Hoyles, of 14, Montgomery Street, Skipton, by his wife, Alice, dau. of Richard Birch, of Grassington, co. York; and brother to Corpl. George Hoyles and Private Richard Hoyles (q.v.); b. Hebden, co. York, 5 June 1885; educ. Skipton; enlisted in the 6th Battn. The Liverpool Regt. in 1901; took part in the South African War (South African Medal and three bars). On leaving the Army he went to Canada, and settled near Markdale, Ontario, being employed as a Farm Servant; on the outbreak of war he at once joined the Canadian Contingent; served with the Expeditionary Force in France from 17 July, 1915, and was killed in action 3 June 1916. Buried where he fell. He m. at the Baptist Church, Skipton, Agnes (97, Newmarket Street, Skipton), dau. of Joseph Simpson, of Skipton, and had a son, Wilfrid, b. 1 April 1907.

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Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial

Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial

Courtesy of John Gardner, Hebden

Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial - detail

Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial - detail

Courtesy of John Gardner, Hebden

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30 June 1916

SKIPTON ‘CANADIAN’ KILLED

Official news reached Skipton last weekend of the death in action of another local soldier, Sergt. Ernest Hoyles, whose parents live at 14, Montgomery Street. Thirty-one years of age, deceased as a boy attended the old British School, now known as the Brougham Street School. Joining the Army at an early age, he celebrated his 17th birthday whilst serving in the South African war. About four years ago he went out to Canada, but on the outbreak of the present war he joined the 15th Battalion Canadian Highlanders and in due course returned to this country, from where he was sent to the Front nearly twelve months ago.

14 July 1916

A HOT TIME

Another Skipton soldier, Pte. George Hoyles, of the 1/6th West Riding Regiment, was also in at the beginning of the great push, and was wounded at the bottom of the back. In a letter to his wife, who resides at 37, Duckett Street, he mentions that he is in a convalescent camp at Boulogne, and adds:– “I have had a hot time this week. You will very likely have heard that I have been wounded; but don’t be alarmed, it is only slight, although I have been lucky to come out alive. I was buried twice on Sunday night, (July 2nd) and got a slight shrapnel wound in the back on Tuesday. I am expecting to go back to the line in a day or two, so you will see that I am not at all bad. I was close to Burgess when he got killed. The same shell buried Fred Hudson and myself, so I was lucky to get off with that. Fred and myself were together on Tuesday night when we both got hit. Fred got it bad and I expect he will be in England soon. I saw J. Bennett - he passed me as he was coming out of the trenches and we were going in. He was all right then. It’s a bad job about my brother Ernest. I should have liked to have met him, but it seemed it had not to be. Don’t trouble about me, I am well looked after.”

30 March 1917

ANOTHER SKIPTON HERO – CORPORAL GEORGE HOYLES

The Second Son Pays the Price

We have to record the death this week of another well-known Skipton soldier in the person of Corporal George Hoyles, whose wife and daughter live at 37, Duckett Street, Skipton. Mrs. Hoyles received a telegram from the Infantry Records Office, York, on Saturday, stating that her husband had been dangerously wounded in the head by a gun shot on the previous day, and this was followed by another telegram on Tuesday to the effect that he had died from the wounds in hospital on the day that he was admitted (Friday).

34 years of age, deceased was a gas stoker at the Skipton Urban Council’s Gasworks up to enlisting in the West Riding Regiment in November 1915, and had been in France nearly 12 months, during which time he had never had leave. He was previously wounded last July, and had been twice ‘buried’ by the bursting of shells. By his death, his father, Mr. George Hoyles, of Montgomery Street, Skipton, sustains his second bereavement owing to the war: another son, Sergeant Ernest Hoyles, having been killed about 9 months ago. Mr. Hoyles has a third son in the Army, Pte. Richard Hoyles, who is also in the trenches.

On Wednesday morning, Mrs. Hoyles received the following touching letter from the Rev. W.O. Edwards, Chaplain:– “I am so very sorry to have to tell you that your dear husband was brought to this Clearing Station late on Friday night. He was very badly wounded in the head, was quite unconscious and dying. He passed away before midnight and I laid him to rest this afternoon (Sunday) in the British Cemetery in this place. A cross will be erected over his grave in the course of a few days. My heart bleeds for all the poor mothers and wives who are losing their dear ones in this horrible war. God grant it may soon be over. I do pray God will comfort and bless you in your sorrow and sore distress and help you to bear your trouble bravely. Your husband has died a hero, but I know how difficult it is to gain comfort from that thought alone.”

09 November 1917

THE LAST OF THREE SONS – PRIVATE RICHARD HOYLES, SKIPTON

By the death in action on October 5th of Private Richard Hoyles, East Lancashire Regiment, Mr. George Hoyles, of 14, Montgomery Street, Skipton, has suffered a third war bereavement: two other sons having fallen previously – Sergeant Ernest Hoyles, who was killed in June 1916, and Corporal George Hoyles, who died from wounds in March last. Mr. Hoyles also suffered an irreparable loss in the death of his wife last November, and much sympathy is felt for him in the district.

Pte. Hoyles, whose wife and child live in Dawson Street, Skipton, was 37 years of age, and prior to enlisting had lived for several years at Colne where he worked as a weaver. Formerly he played football with the Skipton Trinity Club, and both he and his brothers were well known in the district. The sad news was conveyed to his wife in a letter from one of his officers.

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30 June 1916

SKIPTON SOLDIERS KILLED IN ACTION

Another Skipton soldier, named Sergt. Ernest Hoyles, of the 15th Battalion Canadian Highlanders, and of 14, Montgomery Street, Skipton, has been killed in action. The late soldier, who was 31 years of age, was a native of Skipton. He was an old boy of the British School. He joined the army at an early age, and he celebrated his seventeenth birthday whilst serving in the South African War. He went out to Canada about four years ago, and on the outbreak of war he immediately joined the Canadian contingent, and he had been at the Front nearly twelve months.

14 July 1916

CRAVEN CASUALTIES IN THE GREAT ADVANCE

Mrs. Hoyles of 37, Duckett Street, Skipton, on Monday morning last, received the following letter from her husband, Private George Hoyles, of the 1st 6th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, who is at present in a convalescent camp at Boulogne, suffering from a slight wound at the bottom of his back:– “I have had a hot time this week. You will very likely have heard that I have been wounded, but don’t be alarmed, it is only slight, and I have been lucky to come out alive. I was buried twice on Sunday night and got a slight shrapnel wound in the back on Tuesday. I am at a camp in Boulogne at present getting a rest, but expect to go back to the line in a day or two, so you will see I am not bad at all. I was close to Burgess when he got killed. The same shell buried Fred Hudson and myself, so I was lucky to get off with that. Fred and myself were together on Tuesday night when we were both hit. Fred got it bad, and I expect he will be in England soon. I saw J. Bennett as he was coming out of the trenches and we were going in. He was all right then. It is a bad job about my brother Ernest. I should have liked to have met him, but it seems it had not to be. Don’t trouble about me, I am well looked after.” Private Hoyle’s brother Ernest was a sergeant and was only killed in action about two or three weeks ago.

30 March 1917

SKIPTON SOLDIER DIES OF WOUNDS

News has been received that Corporal George Hoyles, of the West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. George Hoyles, of 14, Montgomery Street, Skipton, and husband of Mrs. Hoyles, of 37, Duckett Street, Skipton, died of gunshot wounds in the head at a Casualty Clearing Station in France, on March 23rd. Corporal Hoyles, who was 34 years of age, enlisted in November, 1915, and went out to France in April in the following year. He was formerly employed at the Skipton Gas Works as a stoker. He leaves a widow and one daughter to mourn their loss. On July 3rd of last year Corporal Hoyle was wounded in the back, and after receiving treatment in hospital he returned to the Front. In a letter to Mrs. Hoyles, Rev. W.O. Edwards, a church of England Chaplain, writes:– “I am very sorry to have to tell you that your dear husband was brought to this Casualty Clearing station late on Friday night. He was very badly wounded in the head. He was quite unconscious and has died. He passed away before midnight, and I laid him to rest this afternoon (Sunday) in the British Cemetery in this place. A cross will be erected over his grave in the course of a few days. My heart bleeds for all the poor mothers and wives who are losing their dear ones in this horrible war. God grant it may soon be over. I do pray God will comfort and bless you in your sorrow and sore distress, and help you to bear your trouble bravely. Your husband has died a hero, but I know how difficult it is to gain comfort from that thought.”

A brother of Corporal Hoyles – Sergt. Ernest Hoyles of the Canadians Highlanders – was killed in action about June of last year. The latter was 31 years of age. He joined the army at an early age, and he celebrated his seventeenth birthday while serving in the South African War. He was out in Canada when war broke out, and he immediately joined the Canadian Contingent, and when he was killed he had been at the front nearly twelve months. There is also another brother, Pte. Richard Hoyles, serving in France.

09 November 1917

THREE SKIPTON BROTHERS KILLED

Information has been received that Pte. Richard Hoyles, of the East Lancashire Regiment, son of Mr. George Hoyles, of 14, Montgomery Street, Skipton, and husband of Mrs. Hoyles, of 10, Dorset Street, Skipton, was killed in action on October 5th. Pte. Hoyles, who was 37 years of age, went out to France in December, 1916. He was formerly employed at Colne as a weaver, and prior to enlisting was a playing member of the Trinity Football team. Mr. Hoyles has lost two other sons in the war, Sergt. Ernest Hoyles, who was killed in action in June, 1916, and Corporal George Hoyles, who died as a result of wounds received in action in March this year. Mr. Hoyles also lost his wife in November of last year.

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