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John Caldwell McINTYRE

Main CPGW Record

Surname: McINTYRE

Forename(s): John Caldwell

Place of Birth: Wigton, Cumberland

Service No: ---

Rank: T/2nd Lieutenant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Alexandra, Princess of Wales’s Own (Yorkshire Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 7th Division

Age: 21

Date of Death: 1915-10-05

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: VIII. H. 8.

CWGC Cemetery: CABARET-ROUGE BRITISH CEMETERY, SOUCHEZ

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON – ERMYSTED’S GRAMMAR SCHOOL, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

John Caldwell McIntyre was the son of Andrew and Jean Campbell McIntyre, née Neil. Both parents were born at Kilbarchan, Renfrewshire, Scotland.

1901 Brierfield, Lancashire Census: 40, Chapel Street - John C. McIntyre, aged 7 years, born Wigton, Cumberland, son of Andrew and Jennie McIntyre.

1911 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 27, Ings Avenue - John Caldwell Macintyre, aged 17 years, born Wigton, Cumberland, son of Andrew and Jennie Macintyre.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: A/Sjt John Caldwell McIntyre, S/4919, A. & S. Highrs.; T/2nd Lt. 2nd Battn Yorks Regt. Theatre of War: (1) France. Qualifying date [for 1914-15 Star]: 28.6.15. D. of Wds. 5.10.15. Address: A. McIntyre Esq (Father), 27, Ings Avenue, Skipton, York.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: 2 Lieut J.C. McIntyre, Yorkshire Regiment. D. of W. 5.10.15.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: 2 Lieut J.C. McIntyre, Yorkshire Regt. Date and Place of Death: 5.10.15. Presumed. To whom Authorised/Amount Authorised: Father and Admr. - Andrew McIntyre Esq. £59 1s. 2d.

John's father served with the 6th Bn West Riding Volunteers from the 16 June 1916 until resigning on 28 June 1917.

A short biography of John is included in: ‘A Grammar School at War - The Story of Ermysted’s Grammar School during the Great War’ by Steven Howarth (2007).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

McINTYRE, Lieut. J.C., 2nd West Yorkshires, 27, Ings Avenue, Broughton Road, [Skipton], prominent Rugby footballer, severely wounded, taken prisoner, and later died from his wounds, 1915.

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T/2nd Lieutenant John Caldwell McINTYRE

T/2nd Lieutenant John Caldwell McINTYRE

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Alexandra, Princess of Wales’s Own (Yorkshire Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Alexandra, Princess of Wales’s Own (Yorkshire Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 7th Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 7th Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: McINTYRE

Forename(s): John Caldwell

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: 2/Lt (Tp)

Regiment: Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own (Yorkshire Regiment)

Battalion: 11th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 05/10/15

Died How: Died of wounds

Theatre of War:

Notes: (Att 2/Bn)

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: McINTYRE

Forename(s): John Caldwell

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment: Yorkshire Regiment

Unit: 2nd Bn.

Age: 21

Awards:

Died Date: 05/10/1915

Additional Information: Son of Mr. A. McIntyre, of 27, Ings Avenue, Skipton, Yorks. Born at Wigton, Cumberland.

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1916

MCINTYRE John Caldwell of 27 Ings-avenue Skipton Yorkshire a second-lieutenant in the Yorkshire regiment of His Majesty’s Forces died 5 October 1915 on active military service in France Administration Wakefield 10 January to Andrew McIntyre cotton cloth designer. Effects £42 19s. 11d.

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John Caldwell McIntyre

John Caldwell McIntyre

Courtesy of Ermysted’s Grammar School Archive

Skipton Rugby F.C. Winner's Yorks Challenge Cup 1911-12

Skipton Rugby F.C. Winner's Yorks Challenge Cup 1911-12

Standing L-R: J.C. McIntyre, J. Pickard, J. Graham, W. Fletcher, P. Fields, S. Bishop, H. Blakey; Middle Row L-R: A. Lambert, A.M. McIntosh, C. Tosney (Capt.), A. Clark, W. Scott; Front Row L-R: C. Thwaites, W. Brayshaw, J.E. Gill, G. Fennerty.

Courtesy of Dr J. K. Elwood, Skipton

'YORKSHIRE RUGBY FOOTBALL UNION - IN MEMORIAM 1914-19'

'YORKSHIRE RUGBY FOOTBALL UNION - IN MEMORIAM 1914-19'

McINTYRE, J. C., Lieutenant Yorkshire Regiment. Severely wounded at taken prisoner at Loos September 1915. Died at Seclin, Germany, October 1915. Skipton R. F. C.

WEST YORKSHIRE PIONEER ILLUSTRATED WAR RECORD

WEST YORKSHIRE PIONEER ILLUSTRATED WAR RECORD

T/2nd Lieutenant John Caldwell McIntyre

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09 April 1915

COMMISSION FOR A SKIPTON ‘OLD BOY’

Mr. J. McIntyre, a former captain of Ermysted's Grammar School, Skipton, and St. John's College, York, has been granted a commission as 2nd-Lieutenant in the 11th South Lancashire Regiment, and takes up duty at Oxford this week-end. Second-Lieutenant McIntyre, who is perhaps best known to Skiptonians as a Rugby football player, enlisted as a private in the Gordon Highlanders shortly after the outbreak of war. He was first stationed at Aberdeen, but subsequently transferred to the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders, with which regiment he has since trained at Stirling and Salisbury Plain. When he obtained his commission he ranked as sergeant and also held the gymnasium instructor's certificate, having passed through the School at Aldershot. While at Ermysted's Grammar School, Second-Lieut. McIntyre won the cross country championship three years in succession, the sports championship once, and has also figured in both Cumberland and Yorkshire Rugby County trials. He is one of the Skipton Club’s most popular players, and he will take up his new duties with the best wishes of a host of friends.

01 October 1915

ANOTHER SKIPTON OFFICER WOUNDED.

On Wednesday morning, Mr. A. McIntyre, Ings Avenue, Skipton, received a telegram from the War Office Authorities announcing, with regret, that his son, Second-Lieut. J. C. McIntyre, 2nd Yorkshire Regiment, was wounded September 25-26. Further information, it was stated, would be wired when available.

Second-Lieut. McIntyre is a former captain of Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton, and St. John's College, York. He enlisted as a private in the Gordon Highlanders shortly after the outbreak of war, and was stationed at Aberdeen. Subsequently he transferred to the Argyle and Sutherland Regiment, and trained with them at Stirling and Salisbury Plain. He attained the rank of sergeant and also held the gymnasium instructor's certificate, having passed through the school at Aldershot.

Early in April last he was gazetted Second-Lieut. and attached to the 11th South Lancashire, but was later transferred to the 2nd Yorkshires, with which regiment he went to the Front about three months ago.

Second-Lieut. McIntyre was well-known locally as a fine all-round athlete. While at Ermysted’s Grammar School he won the cross country championship three years in succession, and was also sports champion. He was one of the Skipton Rugby Football Club’s most prominent players, and had a big share in that memorable cup final between Skipton and Otley at Ilkley, while he has figured in both Yorkshire and Cumberland County trial games, qualifying for the former by residence and the latter by birth. Prior to the War he was training for the scholastic profession.

08 October 1915

LIEUT. McINTYRE SAID TO BE PRISONER

Since news was received more than a week ago that Lieut. J. C. McIntyre, of the 2nd Yorkshire Regiment, had been wounded, his relatives have been anxiously awaiting further details of the occurrence. For several days these were not forthcoming, despite the fact that Mr. A. McIntyre, of Ings Avenue, Skipton, father of the unfortunate officer, telegraphed to the War Office authorities.

It was not until Wednesday morning that additional information was received, this being in the shape of a letter from a colleague of Lieut. Mclntyre, in which the writer says:– “I very much regret to tell you that your son has been wounded and taken prisoner. On the 25th we were holding a certain position when he was wounded, seriously I am afraid, both legs being broken, and he was taken to our first aid station, where he was attended to by the medical officer. At night, while still holding our position, the Germans somehow got in behind us, and eventually, as no help came, we were being surrounded, and with difficulty we got away, but we had to leave the wounded to fall into German hands.

“It may be of some comfort to tell you that two of our men, who had been taken by the Germans and escaped again, were quite well treated by them. In any case I cannot think they would ill-treat the wounded.”

This unfortunate intelligence will be received with general regret in the Skipton district, where Lieut. McIntyre was well-known and very popular.

29 October 1915

LIEUTENANT McINTYRE’S WHEREABOUTS

Although no definite information has come through as to the whereabouts of Lieut. McIntyre, 2nd Yorkshire Regiment, who was wounded during the big advance on September 25th and 26th, letters have since been received by Mr. A. McIntyre, of Ings Avenue, Skipton which pretty well establish the nature of his injury and place beyond doubt that he is a prisoner of war.

One or two of the letters are from brother officers of Lieut. McIntyre. A Major states that the unfortunate young fellow’s legs are broken, but when the writer saw him last he had no other injury. At the time he was in a hut, under the influence of morphia, along with several other injured officers and a captain of the R.A.M.C.

The latter is now a prisoner in Westphalia and the other wounded men also in the hands of the enemy, so that it is plain that the same fate must have befallen Lieut. McIntyre. In the absence of definite information on this point, however, the relatives are naturally spending a very anxious time.

05 November 1915

THE MYSTERY OF LIEUTENANT McINTYRE

The following letters, received by Mr. A. McIntyre, Ings Avenue, Skipton, may be of interest in that they throw further light on the nature of the injuries received by, and the whereabouts of Lieut. J. C. McIntyre, 2nd Yorkshire Regiment, who was reported wounded, and has been missing since the big advance in France late in September.

They are all from fellow officers, but one encloses a copy of a note written by a non commissioned officer, giving details of what happened in the attack. It states:– “Just a few lines in answer to your letter of yesterday. As you say there are very few of D Company left. Our casualties were 11 killed, 59 wounded, 20 missing, and about 8 are in hospital. The Sergeant Major and -----, also Sergeant ----- were amongst the killed. Very sorry to have to write this news out, as we were all chums before the war. Sergt. Major ----- has also died of his wounds. I think the Battalion has had a very rough time of it, but gave a good account of themselves. No doubt you will learn fully later how they progressed. As far as I can learn the Captain will be a prisoner of war if he has not died of his wounds. I have heard of two or three gallant attempts to save him, but it was such an awful spot, and they had to leave him finally. I am afraid there is little hope of Mr. B., though I gather from those who were near that he was still alive, and being well cared for. I am pleased to say that the other three got back safely to the British lines.”

The officer who encloses this communication explains that there were six officers in the company – the Captain, the officer there was said to be little hope for, and the writer – and he assumed that Lieut. McIntyre is one of the three who got back to the British lines.

Lieut. McIntyre’s Major writes:– “I went into the aid post – a very deep and safe German dug-out – about 8 p.m. on September 25th, and saw your son along with two other officers and the Doctor. I did not talk to your son as he was at that time under morphia. The Doctor told me he had two legs broken, but as far as I remember he had no other wound. I heard from the doctor’s mother two or three days ago to say she had heard officially that her son was a prisoner in Westphalia, so I sincerely hope your son and the two others are with him, as I fancy the Germans generally make our doctors look after their own patients if they capture them. I fancy the legs were broken by the same bullet. Your son was a sterling soldier and I wish we had more like him.”

This latter communication, while affording slight information as to the unfortunate young officer’s whereabouts, still leaves his condition very much in doubt, and the relatives are anxious for additional news.

19 November 1915

MCINTYRE – October 5, in the Field [Feld] Lazarett, Seclin, Germany, [France] as the result of wounds received in action September 25th-26th in France, Lieut. J.C. McIntyre, son of Mr. A. McIntyre, Ings Avenue, Skipton, aged 22.

19 November 1915

THE FATE OF LIEUT. McINTYRE – DIES A PRISONER

After more than a month of anxious waiting Mr. A. McIntyre, of Ings Avenue, Skipton, has received sad news concerning his son, Second Lieut. J. C. McIntyre, 2nd Yorkshire Regiment, who was wounded in the big advance on September 25th-28th, and has since been missing.

Since the first intimation of Lieut. McIntyre’s injury came to hand in the shape of a telegram from the War Office a few days after the engagement, his whereabouts have been wrapped in mystery. Every effort was made to obtain information, but nothing reliable was forthcoming until on Sunday morning last Mr. McIntyre received a letter from the British Red Cross Society in the following terms:–

“DEAR SIR, – We deeply regret to have to inform you that, according to a German list dated October 30th, received by us through Geneva on November 18th, Second Lieut. John C. McIntyre, 2nd Yorkshire Regiment, is reported to have died on October 5th in the Feld Lacarett Section from a shattered thigh, and to have been buried there.”

These, the communication added, were all the details available.

A fortnight ago we published a letter from an officer attached to the 2nd Yorkshires, who wrote to Mr. McIntyre stating that he last saw his son, along with two other wounded officers and the doctor, in a deep German dug-out which had been converted into an aid-post. At the time Lieut. McIntyre was under morphia, and, as far as the officer knew, had both legs broken. Subsequently the writer heard that the doctor was a prisoner in Westphalia. Apparently the British had been compelled to temporarily abandon this section of the trench, and Lieut. McIntyre fell into German hands. It is also evident that the doctor remained with his men to the last, but whether he was with the unfortunate young officer when he died ten days after receiving his wound is not known.

Lieut. McIntyre was probably one of the best known and most popular men who have gone from the Skipton district to fight their Country’s battles. He was a former captain of Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton, and St. John’s College, York. He enlisted as a private in the Gordon Highlanders shortly after the outbreak of hostilities and was first stationed at Aberdeen. Subsequently he transferred to the Argyle and Sutherland Regiment, with which he trained at Stirling and Salisbury Plain. He attained the rank of sergeant and also held the gymnasium instructor’s certificate, having passed through the school at Aldershot. Early in April last he was gazetted Second-Lieut., and attached to the 11th South Lancashires, but was later transferred to the 2nd Yorkshires with which regiment he went to the front more than four month’s ago.

Lieut. McIntyre was a fine all-round athlete, and a typical example of the vigorous, healthy-minded manhood turned out of our public schools. While at Ermysted’s he won the Cross Country Championship three years in succession, and was also sports champion. He was one of the most prominent players in the Skipton Rugby Football Club, and also figured in both Yorkshire and Cumberland County trials, qualifying for the former by residence and the latter by birth. Prior to the war he was training for the scholastic profession.

News of his untimely end will be received with keen regret, and Mr. and Mrs. McIntyre will have the sincere sympathy of a large circle of friends.

03 March 1916

THE LATE LIEUTENANT McINTYRE

In a recent issue of the ‘Green Howards Gazette’, a regimental publication circulated amongst the officers and men of the famous Yorkshire Unit, appears an appreciative reference to the late Lieut. J. C. McIntyre, son of Mr. A. McIntyre, Ings Avenue, Skipton, who died of wounds while a prisoner of war following the British advance in September last. Details of Lieut. McIntyre’s scholastic career are given, and he is referred to as a “sterling soldier of a type that can ill be spared.”

04 August 1916

SKIPTON GRAMMAR SCHOOL – The Roll of Honour

At their day of all days did they think with pride and love of those who – some of those so recently in their midst playing their games, sharing their work, living their life, learning their ideals – had carried these ideals on to the field of battle to fight for King and Country as once they fought for their school. It was impossible to give them a full list of all old boys who had joined the Colours, but they owed it to the memory of these heroes of the Skipton Grammar School who had so willingly given their lives to the Empire to do public honour and reverence to their names.

The following old boys and masters had died on active service:–

Lieut. C. W. Brown, Sergt. J. Cockerill, Second-Lieut. H. Colley, Major M. T. Cookson, Lieut. H. Knowles, Second-Lieut. J. C. McIntyre, Lieut. E.J.C. Supple, Pte. F. Thornton, Second-Lieut. Ian Wilson

Let their example, and the example of all their sons who had so freely responded to their country’s call, be the dominant thought in this their day of thanksgiving. God give them grace to keep the tradition that they had made for them.

06 October 1916

McINTYRE – In memory of our dearly beloved son, John Caldwell McIntyre, who died October 5th, 1915.

When we think of the bright happy days of the past,
And all that their memory endears;
And the hopes that hung o’er them for ever o’ercast,
We could pour out our spirit in tears.

13 April 1917

“FELL DOING HIS DUTY NOBLY” – SKIPTON FOOTBALLER KILLED IN ACTION: GUNNER GEO. WILLIAM FLETCHER

It is with much regret that we have to record this week the death in action of Gunner George William Fletcher of the Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery, son of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Fletcher of 32 George Street, Skipton, and a well known Skipton footballer. News of the sad event, which apparently occurred about Wednesday of last week, was received last weekend in the following letter from deceased’s officer:– “I much regret to have to inform you that your son met a soldier’s end in action. He fell doing his duty nobly, as the excellent gunner he was, with the lanyard in his hand. His name will be the first to be inscribed on the Roll of Honour of the ----- Siege Battery, and none will, I am certain, be more sincerely lamented. He was struck by a piece of shell in the head and killed instantly, and his death must have been painless. Please accept the sympathy of both officers and men in your bereavement.”

Twenty-nine years of age, deceased was a warp-dresser in the employ of Mr. J. Wilkinson, Park Shed, prior to enlisting in February 1915, and he had been in France about nine months. Amongst the sporting public of the town and district he will be remembered as one of the best forwards for many seasons of the Skipton Rugby Football Club, and he was one of the clever fifteen which, in 1911-12, carried off the Yorkshire Challenge Cup. For a brief period he also assisted the Ilkley Rugby team.

His brother, Pte. Charles Smith Fletcher, has also been at the Front with the West Riding Regiment and was recently seriously wounded in the thigh. He is now in Liverpool hospital. He was also in the employ of Mr. Wilkinson as a dyer.

With the death of Gunner Fletcher, the Skipton Football Club’s Roll of Honour has been increased to six, the other five being Lieut. J.C. McIntyre, Lance-Corporal J. Willan and Privates S. Bishop, F. Thornton and Fred Gallagher.

05 October 1917

McINTYRE – In memory of our dear son, John Caldwell McIntyre, who died October 5th 1915.

Ah, we miss him, Oh how sadly!
Loving hearts alone can tell.

From his Mother and Father.

30 November 1917

SKIPTON BAPTISTS’ MEMORIAL TO SOLDIERS

On Tuesday afternoon a three days’ sale of work was commenced in the Baptist School, Otley Street, Skipton, in aid of the Soldiers’ Memorial Extension Fund, by means of which it is intended to extend the premises in memory of the young men associated with the place who have paid the supreme sacrifice in the war. Seventy young men belonging to the church and school are at present serving with the Colours, of whom two, H. Maudsley (deacon and Sunday School superintendent) and H. Birch have been missing since May 3rd and August 17th respectively, while the following have given their lives in the great cause:– S. Bishop, J. McIntyre, J. Duckworth, G.A. Wilson, H. Greenwood, D. Collins, B. Peel (Sunday School secretary), H. Scott, A. Bruce, J. Metcalfe, A. Gill, W. Barraclough, E. Platt and W. Ireland…

04 October 1918

McINTYRE – In memory of our beloved son, John Caldwell McIntyre, who died in France October 5th. 1915.

Oh for the touch of a vanished hand
And the sound of a voice that is still.

From Father and Mother.

04 July 1919

PEACE SUPPLEMENT TO THE 'CRAVEN HERALD' – CRAVEN'S FALLEN OFFICERS

LIEUTENANT J. C. McINTYRE

West Yorks. Regiment and 11th South Lancs. Regiment, son of Mr. A. McIntyre, Ings Avenue, Skipton, died a prisoner of war in Germany, former Captain of Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton, and St. John’s College, York.

03 October 1919

McINTYRE – In memory of our dear beloved son, John Caldwell McIntyre, who died in France, October 5th, 1915.

The road of life is hard to travel
When deprived of those we loved.

From Father and Mother.

08 October 1920

McINTYRE – In loving remembrance of our dear brother, John Caldwell McIntyre, died October 5th, 1915.

“One of the best.”

From Lily and Stephen, 19 Keighley Road, Skipton.

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19 March 1915

Skipton Grammar School Roll of Honour

Corrections and additions

† Addition
* Correction

† H. Colley (Master) Inns of Court O.T.C.
† J.P.Y. Dickey, 2nd Lieut., 10th Lancashire Fusiliers
*R.G.A. Dickey, 2nd Lieut., 5th (R) Manchester Regiment
† A. Goodman, 2nd Lieut., 5th East Lancashire Regiment
† A.E.P. Leak, Gunner, R.F.A.
* Oswald Leak, Electrician. H.M.S. ‘Scotia’
*J.C. McIntye, 2nd Lieut., Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders
*G.S. McKay, 2nd Lieut., R.F.A.
*H. Mallinson, Corporal, Welsh Fusiliers
*Chris Maudsley, Pte., A.S.C.
*C.G.M. Morris (Master) 2nd Lieut., 9th Royal Berkshire Regiment
*J. Pethybridge, 2nd Lieut., Royal Engineers
*Alfred Waddington, 2nd Lieut., 5th East Lancashire Regiment
*Alan Wilson, Lieut., R.A.M.C. in charge of 4 batteries, Lahore Division of Indian Army
*Alec Wilson, 2nd Lieut., Herefordshire Regiment (Service Batt.)
*Colin Wilson, Lieut., R.A.M.C. in charge of 4 batteries, Royal Garrison Artillery
*Leslie Wilson, Sub-Lieut., R.N.R. (sub-mariner)

01 October 1915

LIEUT. McINTYRE OF SKIPTON WOUNDED

On Wednesday morning, Mr. A. McIntyre of 27 Ings Avenue, Broughton Road, Skipton, received a telegram from the War Office stating that his son, 2nd Lieut. J.C. McIntyre, had been wounded in action in France, and that further news would be telegraphed as soon as possible.

Lieut. McIntyre, who is in the 2nd West Yorks. Regiment, is an ‘old boy’ of Ermysted’s Grammar School, Skipton, and St. John’s College, York. He is perhaps best known to Skiptonians as a Rugby football player. He enlisted as a private shortly after the outbreak of the war. When he obtained his commission he ranked as sergeant, and also held a gymnasium instructor’s certificate, having passed through the school at Aldershot. While at Ermysted’s Grammar School, Lieut. McIntyre won the cross-country championship three years in succession, the sports championship once, and he has also figured in both Cumberland and Yorkshire Rugby County trials. He was one of the Skipton Club’s most popular players. The news of his being wounded will be received with deep regret.

08 October 1915

LIEUT. J.C. McINTYRE A PRISONER OF WAR

As we reported last week, Mr. A. McIntyre of 27 Ings Avenue, Broughton Road, Skipton, received a telegram from the War Office stating that his son, 2nd Lieut. J.C. McIntyre, had been wounded in action in France. This week Mr. McIntyre has received the following letter from an officer connected with the same regiment as Lieut. McIntyre:– “I very much regret to tell you that your son is wounded and a prisoner. On Sept. 25th we were holding some quarries when he was wounded – seriously I am afraid, both legs being broken – and he was taken to our First Aid Station in the quarries where he was attended to by the medical officer. At night while we were holding our position in front of the quarries the Germans somehow got in behind us and eventually, as no help came and as we were being surrounded, we got away with difficulty and had to leave the wounded who fell into the Germans’ hands. It might be of some comfort to tell you that two of our men who had been taken prisoner and escaped were quite well treated by the Germans. In any case, I cannot think they will ill-treat the wounded. I have given a bare outline of the story, which is a long one. We are just out of the battle. I have much to do. Trusting your son will recover and have a safe return.”

19 November 1915

DEATH OF SECOND LIEUT. JOHN C. McINTYRE

It will be with the very deepest regret that a large circle of friends in Skipton and district will receive the sad news of the death of Second-Lieut. John McIntyre of the 2nd Yorkshires, and son of Mr. A. McIntyre of 27, Ings Avenue, Skipton. He was severely wounded and taken prisoner by the Germans towards the end of September, and up to last week nothing further had been heard about him. However, information has now been received which unhappily leaves no doubt as to his fate by Mr. and Mrs. McIntyre.

The sad tidings were received on Sunday in a letter from the British Red Cross Society and the Order of St. John, as follows:– “We deeply regret to have to inform you that according to a German list, dated October 30th, received by us through Geneva, on November 18th, Second-Lieut. John McIntyre of the 2nd Yorkshire Regiment, is reported to have died on October 5th, in the Field Hazarett, Sielin, from a shattered thigh and to have been buried there.”

The following is the letter which was received by Mr. McIntyre after his son had been wounded, and it is written by an officer in the same regiment as Lieut. McIntyre:– “I very much regret to tell you that your son is wounded and a prisoner. On September 25th we were holding some quarries when he was wounded – seriously I am afraid, both legs being broken – and he was taken to our field station in the quarries where he was attended to by the Medical Officer. At night while we were holding our position in front of the quarries the Germans somehow got in behind us and eventually, as no help came and as we were being surrounded, we got away with difficulty and had to leave the wounded who fell into the Germans’ hands. . . . Trusting your son will recover and have a safe return.”

Lieut. McIntyre was a fine all-round athlete and a well known member of the Skipton Rugby Club, whilst he also figured prominently in York. and Cumberland County trials.

24 December 1915

CRAVEN’S ROLL OF HONOUR – SKIPTON

Lieut. J.C. McIntyre, 2nd West Yorks. Regiment, and son of Mr. A. McIntyre of 27 Ings Avenue, Broughton Road, Skipton, who was severely wounded, taken prisoner and later died from his wounds. A prominent Rugby footballer and well-known in Skipton.

14 December 1917

FOUNDER’S DAY AT SKIPTON GRAMMAR SCHOOL

A Fifteenth Century Foundation – War Memorial Proposed

COMMEMORATION SERVICE

Wednesday’s proceedings were opened with a service in commemoration not only of the founders and benefactors of the school but also of the gallant men who formerly passed through the school and who had given their lives for their country in the present war. The service was conducted by the headmaster (Rev. F.G. Forder) in the big school and there was a good attendance of old boys and others interested in the school. The names of the fallen heroes are as follows:– 2nd Lieut. T.B. Bellamy, Captain C.D. Bennett, 2nd Lieut. T.D. Broughton, Captain C.W. Brown, Gunner Philip Brown, Corporal H.S. Caw, Sergt. J. Cockerill, 2nd Lieut. H. Colley (master), Major M.E. Cookson, 2nd Lieut. E.G. Goodman, 2nd Lieut. F.H. Gill, Private W. Hartley, Rifleman W.M. Jowett, Lieut. H. Knowles, 2nd Lieut. C.H. Lee (master), 2nd Lieut. J.C. McIntyre, Captain J.B. McKay, Lance-Corporal A.J. Metcalfe, J.H. [E.] Metcalfe, Private E. Platt, Private C.T.W. Rigby, 2nd Lieut. W.A. Rodwell, Sergt. A.F. Ryder, Lieut. E.J.C. Supple (master), Private F. Thornton, Rifleman H. Tindall, Sergt. H. Walker, Gunner Herbert Watson, 2nd Lieut. Alec Wilson, Private Cameron Wilson, 2nd Lieut. Ian Wilson.

Among the old boys who have gained distinctions are the following:– Military Cross, Second-Lieutenant J.G. Berry, Second-Lieutenant J.B. Hartley, Captain J.T. Hurst, Lieut. P. Jowett, Lieut. J. Petty, and Capt. T.B. Pollard (master); Distinguished Conduct Medal, Corpl. W.A. Murgatroyd; Mentioned in Despatches, Lieut. J. Pethybridge, Capt. Allan Wilson, and many others.

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