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John George WAGGITT

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Surname: WAGGITT

Forename(s): John George

Place of Birth: Tunstall, Yorkshire

Service No: 87051

Rank: Gunner

Regiment / Corps / Service: Canadian Field Artillery

Battalion / Unit: 19th Battery 4th Brigade

Division: 4th Canadian Division

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1917-07-30

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: In South-West part.

CWGC Cemetery: ADDINGHAM (ST. PETER) CHURCHYARD

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: ADDINGHAM, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: ILKLEY, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

John George Waggitt (born 10 May 1893) was the son of William (John) and Jane Ann Waggitt, née Robinson and brother of L/Corporal William Waggitt (12901) (q.v.). William (John) was born at Tunstall and Jane Ann at Scotton, Yorkshire. Both died in March 1932. Why and when the surname changed from Crabtree to Waggitt is not known.

1901 Nosterfield, Yorkshire Census: Masons Arms Inn - John Geo Crabtree, aged 6 years, born Tunstall, Yorkshire, son of William and Jane Ann Crabtree.

1911 Addingham Census: Chelker Farm - John Waggitt, aged 17 years, born, Tunstill, near Richmond, Yorkshire. [John Waggitt was working for Edwin Townson, Farmer.]

St. Peter's Church, Addingham, burial register: John Thomas [sic] Waggitt, aged 23 years. Abode: Moorside, Addingham. Buried 3 August 1917.

Canadian service records: http://www.baclac.gc.ca/eng/discover/military-heritage/first-world-war/first-world-war-1914-1918-cef

Data Source: Local War Memorial

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

WAGGETT, Driver John George, aged 23, Canadian F.A., son of Mr. John Waggett, Moorside Farm, [Addingham], drowned Ilkley, July 31, 1917.

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No photo available for this Soldier
Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Canadian Field Artillery

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Canadian Field Artillery

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 4th Canadian Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 4th Canadian Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: No entry in SDGW - Canadian Forces.

Forename(s):

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank:

Regiment:

Battalion:

Decorations:

Died Date:

Died How:

Theatre of War:

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: WAGGITT

Forename(s): J G

Country of Service: Canadian

Service Number: 87051

Rank: Gunner

Regiment: Canadian Field Artillery

Unit: 4th Bde.

Age: 23

Awards:

Died Date: 30/07/1917

Additional Information: Son of John and Jane Ann Waggitt, of Moorside Farm, Addingham. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: THY WILL BE DONE)

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1932

WAGGITT John of Moorside Farm Moorside Ilkley Yorkshire died 18 March 1932 at The General Infirmary Leeds Administration London 25 May to William Townson and William Lancaster farmers. Effects £253 8s. 2d.

WAGGITT Jane Ann of Moorside Farm Moorside Ilkley Yorkshire widow died 25 March 1932 Probate London 6 May to William Townson and William Lancaster farmers. Effects £316 6s. 2d.

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St Peter's Churchyard, Addingham

St Peter's Churchyard, Addingham

CWGC Headstone

Memorial Chamber of Canada’s Parliament Buildings, Ottawa

Memorial Chamber of Canada’s Parliament Buildings, Ottawa

In the Memorial Chamber are the eight ‘Books of Remembrance’ that contain the names of more than 120,000 Canadians who gave their lives in the service of Canada

Source: Canadian Virtual War Memorial (Kindly supplied by Shirley Penman, Clitheroe)

Page from the First World War ‘Book of Remembrance’: Gunner John George Waggitt

Page from the First World War ‘Book of Remembrance’: Gunner John George Waggitt

Source: Canadian Virtual War Memorial (Kindly supplied by Shirley Penman, Clitheroe)

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17 November 1916

NEWS OF ADDINGHAM SOLDIERS

Mr. Flint has received further letters in acknowledgment of parcels. J.G. Waggitt, 2nd Canadian Division, writes:– “We are having very bad weather here just now. I saw some of the Addingham boys just before my brother was killed, but they are not round here now. I had a little talk with Ruben Smith just a few days before he was wounded; he was with my brother at the time. We don’t get much news these days.” – E. Hargreaves writes:– “We have just had a real old time – Guy Fawkes bon fire with some ammunition boxes &c., so we can all gather round, dry our clothes and smoke to our heart’s content. I was sorry to hear my old friend Town had been wounded. I hope he is progressing favourably.” H. Spencer writes:– “We are away from the trenches at present and having a rest, but expect we shall be going up again presently. Thanking you and the subscribers for your kindness.”

A collection made at Miss Pickersgill Cunliffe’s Ladies’ Bible Class on Sunday afternoon last for the Soldiers and Sailors’ Parcels Fund realised £1 5s. – The contents of the Christmas parcels will be as follows:– plum loaf, salmon, toffee, soap, French paste, socks and Christmas card. It will prevent disappointment if those who have sons or brothers who have enlisted from Addingham will let the secretaries, Mr. Nuttall or Mr. Flint, have their addresses so that there may be no one missed out.

03 August 1917

WAGGITT – Found drowned in Heber’s Ghyll, Ilkley, Tuesday, July 31st 1917, Driver John George Waggitt, Canadian Field Artillery, son of Mr. John Waggitt, Moorside Farm, Addingham, aged 23 years.

03 August 1917

ADDINGHAM – SOLDIER’S TRAGIC DEATH

John George Waggett [Waggitt], a driver in the Canadian Field Artillery, son of Mr. John Waggett, Moorside Farm, Addingham, was found dead in Heber’s Ghyll, Ilkley, on Tuesday morning. Waggett, who was about twenty-three years of age, came home on furlough on Monday morning and went down to Ilkley in the afternoon. He complained of being very tired, and it is supposed he fell asleep while leaning over the bridge spanning the ravine and fell into the stream below. He had to pass over the bridge on his way home. A brother was some time ago killed at the Front.

THE INQUEST

The inquest was held at the Conservative Club, Addingham, on Wednesday afternoon and was presided over by Mr. Edgar Wood, coroner.

John Waggett, identified the body as that of his son, John George Waggett. He was a driver in the Canadian Field Artillery, and was 23 years of age. He had come home from France early on Monday morning on leave. He stayed at home until 2.30 and then went down to Ilkley. They expected him back in the evening. He last saw him at the Listers’ Arms, Ilkley, about 6.30. He asked him to come home, but he said he was tired of riding; he would walk home and be there as soon as him. He had only one friend with him, a civilian. He was sober and he did not think he ever tasted anything to drink. He had not been to bed since leaving France. Heber’s Ghyll, where he was found, was on his way home. He was a very steady young man.

Sergeant Goldthorpe, stationed at Ilkley, said he saw the deceased at 12.10 a.m. in Grove Road, Ilkley. He was sat on a seat fast asleep. He woke him up; he was quite sober, but he could tell he had had a drink. He talked to him about 20 minutes, because at first he would keep dropping asleep as he was talking to him. He said he had come home from the Front and he was very tired; he had had no sleep. He said, “I had better be going home, my people will be waiting up and they will be very uneasy.” He picked up his spurs saying he had no idea he had taken them off. He saw him set off home, saying he would just get home by one o’clock. He heard him going straight away, and he was quite capable of taking care of himself. It was not very dark, light enough to see for 50 yards ahead. There was no one else about. It was about three-quarters of a mile from where he left him to where he was found. He walked quite steadily when he set off.

Arthur Hornby Bland, Burley-in-Wharfedale, gardener, said he found the body just below the bridge of Heber’s Ghyll lying in shallow water face downwards at 9.30 on Tuesday morning. There was a steep bank and a drop from the bridge of 20 feet, and 12 feet down the bank-side sloping to the water. He thought he might have fallen down the bank and then rolled in. His cap was lying against his feet. There was no sign of there having been any struggling on the bank.

Inspector Bell said he recovered the body, and it was in the position described by last witness. Deceased appeared to have been dead some time. He thought he had fallen from the bridge top straight into the water. He was in the middle of the gully and it was about five yards wide, and he was lying in the position he would expect to find him if he had fallen off the bridge. His head was down the stream and his feet towards the bridge. There were no signs of anything on the bank, which was soft and mossy, and it would have been easy to see if there had been any struggling. He was lying opposite the bridge. He had £14 11s. 6d. on him. The water was about 18 inches deep where his head was.

Dr. Crabtree, Addingham, said he saw the body on Tuesday evening, and he could not find anything to account for the death of deceased except drowning. He had a bruise on the lower border of the ribs on the right side; he thought it had been done in the fall, but it would not cause death. He might have been winded by the fall, but he thought he had died from suffocation by drowning.

The Coroner, in summing up, said the last time deceased was seen he was quite sober, but overborne for want of sleep and he had no doubt fallen off the bridge into the water and accidently drowned.

The jury returned the verdict ‘Accidently fell into the water and was drowned.’

The Coroner and jury expressed their deep sympathy with the bereaved family.

10 August 1917

ADDINGHAM – THE LATE DRIVER WAGGITT

The funeral of Driver John George Waggitt, of the Canadian Field Artillery, whose death was reported last week, took place on Friday afternoon last at the Parish Church Burial Ground. The members of the Addingham Platoon of the West Riding Volunteers, in command of Sergt. Baker, met the mourners at the top of the village, and formed an escort to the Church. The service in the Church and at the graveside was conducted by the Rev. J.W. Hall (rector). The firing party fired a military salute and the ‘Last Post’ was sounded. The chief mourners were Mr. and Mrs. Waggitt, Miss Waggitt, Miss Hannah Waggitt, Miss Lily Waggitt (sisters), Mr. and Mrs. Lister Ellis, Mr. and Mrs. C. Brown, Mrs. Nixon, Mrs. Gregson (Moorside), Mr. Capstick (Woodhouse, Ilkley), Mr. Watson and Mr. E. Thackray (Netherwood), Mr. S. Whiteoak, Mr. John Rishworth, Mr. H. Todd, Mr. W. Lancaster, Mr. H. Moore, Mr. James Pighills, Mr. Bell, Mr. J. Gill, Mr. J. Rishworth, jun., Mr. A. Kendall, Mr. Charles Dewhurst (Moorside), Mr. L. Steel (Turner Lane), Mr. H. Mason, and Mr. R. Thompson (Gildersber).

Wreaths were sent from Nellie, Hannah, Lily, and Fred (somewhere in France), “In loving memory of our dear brothers John and Willie” (Willie fell in France about nine months ago), Mr. and Mrs. Nixon and Master Everitt and John Nixon. There was a large gathering of the public out of sympathy with the bereaved family.

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17 November 1916

ADDINGHAM SOLDIERS’ LETTERS

Mr. Flint has received the following letters in acknowledgement of parcels:–

J.G. Waggitt, of the 19th Batt. C.F.A., 2nd Canadian Division, writes:–“Thanks for parcel; it is kind of you to send me parcel, and nice to think the people at home have not forgotten us. We are having very bad weather here just now. I wish it would clear up for a while. It seems to hinder us quite a lot, but we have the satisfaction of knowing it is just the same for Fritz. I saw some of the Addingham boys just before my brother was killed, but they are not around here now. I had a little talk with Reuben Smith a few days before he was wounded. He was with my brother at the time. We don’t get much news these days.”

03 August 1917

ADDINGHAM SOLDIER DROWNED

A gloom has been cast over the village by the death under painful circumstances of Driver John George Waggitt, of the Canadian Field Artillery, who was found drowned on Tuesday morning at Hebers Ghyll, Ilkley. Deceased was the son of Mr. John Waggitt, farmer, Addingham Moorside, and had only arrived home on leave from France in the early hours of Monday morning. Deceased went to Canada some time previous to the war, and when hostilities broke out he volunteered for service with the Canadian Contingent.

THE INQUEST.

The inquest was held at the Conservative Club Addingham, on Wednesday afternoon, by Mr. Edgar Wood, coroner.

The first witness was John Waggitt, father of deceased, who identified the body as that of his eon. John George Waggitt. He was a Driver in the Canadian Field Artillery, and was 23 years of age, He had come home from France early on Monday morning on leave. He stayed at home until 2-30, and then went down to Ilkley. They expected him back in the evening. He last saw him at the Lister’s Arms, Ilkley, about 6-30. He asked him to come home, but he said he was tired of riding; he would walk home and be there as soon as witness. He had only one friend with him, a civilian. He was sober, and witness did not think he ever tasted anything to drink. He had not been to bed since leaving France. Hebers Ghyll, where he was found, was on his way home. He was a very steady young man.

Sergt. Goldthorpe, stationed at Ilkley, said he saw deceased at 12-30 a.m. in Grove Road, Ilkley. He was sat on a seat fast asleep. Witness woke him up. Deceased was quite sober, but he could tell he had had a drink. He talked to him about twenty minutes, because at first he would keep dropping asleep as he was talking to him. He said he had come home from the front and he was very tired. He had had no sleep. He said, “ I had better be going home; my people will be waiting up and they will be very uneasy.” He picked his spurs up, saying he had no idea he had taken them off, Witness saw him set off home saying he would just get home by one o’clock. He heard him going straight away, and he was quite capable of taking care of himself. It was not very dark; light enough to see for 50 yards ahead. There was no one else about. It was about three-quarters of a mile from where he left him to where he was found. He walked quite steadily when he set off.

Arthur Hornby Bland, Burley-in-Wharfedale, gardener, said he found the body just below the bridge of Hebers Ghyll, lying in shallow water face downwards, at 9-30 on Tuesday morning. There was a steep bank and a drop from the bridge of 20 feet and 12 feet down the bank side sloping to the water. He thought deceased might have fallen down the bank and then rolled in. His cap was lying against his feet. There were no signs of any struggling on the bank.

Inspector Bell said he recovered the body, and it was in the position described by last witness. Deceased appeared to have been dead some time. He thought he had fallen from the bridge top straight into the water. He was in the middle of the gully and it was about five yards wide, and he was just lying in the position he could expect to find him if be had fallen off the bridge His head was down the stream and his feet towards the bridge. There were no signs of anything on the bank, which was soft and mossy, and it would have been easy to see if there had been any struggling. He had £14 11s. 6d. on him. The water was about 18 inches deep where deceased’s head was.

Dr. Crabtree, of Addingham, said he saw the body on Tuesday evening and he could not find anything to account for the death of deceased except drowning. He had a bruise on the lower border of the ribs on the right side. He thought it had been caused by the fall, but it would not cause death. He might have been winded by the fall, but he thought he had died from suffocation by drowning.

The Coroner, in summing up, said the last time deceased was seen he was quite sober but he was overcome for want of sleep, and he had no doubt he fell off the bridge into the water and was accidentally drowned.

The jury returned the verdict “Accidentally fell into the water and was drowned.” The coroner and jury expressed their deep sympathy with the bereaved family.

10 August 1917

ADDINGHAM

THE LATE DRIVER WAGGITT – The funeral of Driver John George Waggitt, of the Canadian Field Artillery, whose death was reported last week, took place on Friday afternoon last at the Parish Church burial ground. Members of the Addingham Platoon of the West Riding Volunteers, in command of Sergt. Belper, met the mourners at the top of the village and formed an escort to the church. The service in the church and at the graveside was conducted by Rev. J.W. Hall (rector). The firing party fired a military salute, and the ‘Last Post’ was sounded. The chief mourners were Mr. and Mrs. Waggitt, Miss Waggitt, Miss Hannah Waggitt, Miss Lily Waggitt (sisters), Mr. and Mrs. Lister Ellis, Mr. and Mrs. C. Brown, Mrs. Nixon, Mrs. Gregson (Moorside), Mr. Capstick Woodhouse (Ilkley), Mr. Matson and Mr. E. Thackray (Netherwood), Mr. S. Whiteoak, Mr. John Rishworth, Mr. H. Todd, Mr. W. Lancaster, Mr. H. Moore, Mr. James Pighills, Mr. Bell, Mr. J. Gill, Mr. J. Rishworth, jun., Mr. A. Kendall, Mr. Charles Dewhurst (Moorside), Mr. L. Stell (Turner Lane), Mr. H. Mason, and Mr. R. Thompson (Gildersber). Wreaths were sent from Nellie, Hannah, Lily and Fred (somewhere in France), in loving memory of our dear brothers John and Willie (Willie fell in France about nine months ago), Mr. and Mrs. Nixon and Masters Everitt and John Nixon. There was a large gathering of the public to show sympathy with the bereaved family.

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