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John MITCHELL

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Surname: MITCHELL

Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire

Service No: 12888

Rank: L/Sergeant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 9th (Service) Battalion

Division: 17th (Northern) Division

Age: 36

Date of Death: 1918-09-21

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: IV. B. 2.

CWGC Cemetery: GOUZEAUCOURT NEW BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: BARDEN, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: BEAMSLEY, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: BOLTON ABBEY, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON – ERMYSTED’S GRAMMAR SCHOOL, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

John Mitchell was the son of John and Annie Mitchell, née Young and brother of Private William Young Mitchell (11091) (q.v.). Both of their parents were born in Scotland - their father at Lintrathen, Forfarshire.

1891 Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire Census: Strid Cottage - John Mitchell, aged 8 years, born Bolton Abbey, son of John and Annie Mitchell.

1901 Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire Census: Strid Cottage - John Mitchell, aged 18 years, born Bolton Abbey, son of John and Annie Mitchell.

1911 Bolton Abbey, Yorkshire Census: Strid Cottage - John Mitchell, aged 28 years, born Bolton Abbey, son of John Mitchell, widower.

John was married to May Mason in 1914.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Cpl John Mitchell, 12888, W. Rid. R. Theatre of War first served in: (1) France. Date of entry therein: 15.9.15. K. in A. 21.9.18.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: Cpl John Mitchell, 12888, 9 W. Rid. R. K. in A. 21.9.18.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: L/Sgt John Mitchell, 12888, 9th Bn W. Riding. Date and Place of Death: 21.9.18 France. To whom Authorised/Amount Authorised: Widow and sole legatee - May. £48 14s. 2d.

Short biographies of John are included in:
‘Swaledale & Wharfedale Remembered - Aspects of Dales’ life through peace and war’ by Keith Taylor (2006).
‘A Grammar School at War - The Story of Ermysted’s Grammar School during the Great War’ by Steven Howarth (2007).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

BOLTON ABBEY

MITCHELL, L.-Sgt. J., West Riding Regiment, son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, killed in action Sept. 25, 1918.

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L/Sergeant John MITCHELL

L/Sergeant John MITCHELL

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 17th (Northern) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 17th (Northern) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: MITCHELL

Forename(s): John

Born: Bolton Abbey, Yorks

Residence: Burnsall, Yorks

Enlisted: Addingham, Yorks

Number: 12888

Rank: L/Sgt

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 9th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 21/09/18

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: MITCHELL

Forename(s): John

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 12888

Rank: Lance Serjeant

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 9th Bn.

Age: 36

Awards:

Died Date: 21/09/1918

Additional Information: Son of John Mitchell. Native of Bolton Abbey, Skipton, Yorks.

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1919

MITCHELL John of Bolton Abbey Yorkshire a private Duke of Wellington’s West Riding regiment died 21 September 1918 in France Administration (with Will) London 26 March to May Mitchell widow. Effects £407 11s. 3d.

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Bolton Abbey (SS. Mary and Cuthbert) Churchyard

Bolton Abbey (SS. Mary and Cuthbert) Churchyard

Family gravestone

© Paul Clarke (WMR-71654)

Bolton Abbey (SS. Mary and Cuthbert) Churchyard

Bolton Abbey (SS. Mary and Cuthbert) Churchyard

Family gravestone - detail of memorial inscription

© Paul Clarke (WMR-71654)

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11 September 1914

BOLTON ABBEY’S LOYALTY

Bolton Abbey has contributed nine of her sturdy sons during the week to Lord Kitchener’s Army, and they left with the Addingham contingent on Monday. They include three sons of Mr. T. Nelson, John Mitchell, Geo. Robinson, Tom Roberts, Charles Binns, H. Woolson, and Percy Boothman; in addition to the postman, who was a reservist. There are doubtless, many more, if required. Well done, Bolton Abbey!

11 September 1914

ADDINGHAM – A LOCAL COMPANY FORMED – Enthusiastic Scenes

A very enthusiastic and largely attended open-air meeting was held on Saturday evening, presided over by Mr. A.V. Mason, C.C., for the purpose of asking for men willing and able to give their services for the safety and well-being of their country.

Mr. Mason said:–“We are engaged in a life and death struggle with a strong and merciless foe. Thank God, we have a strong fleet, strong enough to protect our shores and keep open the source of our food supplies, but we need a larger army to crush the power of Germany. We want young men to join the Army, to fight for their country.” Married men could be perfectly sure that their wives and families will be well looked after. Messrs. Lister and Co. had offered to keep open the place of any man who volunteered and take him back at the same wages.

Captain Mercer, who gave a splendid address, reminded them that our army was suffering loss, and men were wanted to take their places. He had served his country 48 years; therefore he was entitled to stand aside for younger men. Yet when his country needed him he was ready to say “Here am I, take me.” If it had not been for our Navy where should we have been now? We should have been where the Belgians are to-day. If German troops were to land here what would they do? They would drive our women and children before them, just as they had done in Belgium. Savages would not treat their prisoners worse than the Germans had done. He believed all the German Army had been located except three corps, which he thought were in readiness to invade this country if by any chance the German Fleet were to be successful or we were to suffer any great damage through floating mines. He had every confidence in our Navy, although it had not been in battle for a great number of years. We wanted young men to rise as one man, to be ready to fight for their country’s sake. It was the men of the country who alone can fight their country’s battles. “Join the Army now and fight for your freedom” (applause).

Mr. F.H. Humphray, J.P., said 153 men had been sworn in and he hoped he would be busy that night and every night; he did not mind if he sat all night.

Captain T.H.S. Tee also spoke, exhorting the young men to join the Army and defend their country’s honour. He announced that the company would be called the Ilkley and Addingham Company, and as far as possible the men would be placed where they wished.

The Ilkley recruits sworn in marched to Addingham, accompanied by the Ilkley Brass Band, and all attended the meeting, after which hearty cheers were given as the men came up to join. Twenty-one recruits were sworn in on Saturday; several had been sworn in earlier at Ilkley and a few on Sunday and Monday. The following is a list of men from Addingham and Bolton Abbey who have gallantly joined the army:–

Addingham–Corporal Hy. Horsman, F. Burke, W. Hall, C. Moulding, H. Spencer, H. Leech [Leach], G. Thompson, J. Hargreaves, R. Townson, F. Hartley, A. Wade, H. Wade, G. Bailey, F. Chaplin, W.H. Young, J. Lister, J.W. Fisher, F. Fisher, W. Spenceley, W. Wroe, C. Fisher, H. Tunnicliffe, J. Kettlewell, W. Waggott [Waggitt].

Bolton Abbey–N. Nelson, C. Binns, J. Mitchell, G. Robinson, W. Nelson, E. Woolston, J.T. Roberts, A. Nelson.

On Monday the streets of the village reminded one of the now defunct Club Feast (which, singularly enough, would have been on that day), as they were crowded with people. All traffic was held up, the reason being that the Addingham contingent were lined up in readiness to fall in with the full company on their way to Halifax via Keighley. It was about 4.15 when the strains of ‘Off to Tipperary’ were heard in the distance, and very soon the company of recruits for Lord Kitchener’s Army came in sight. A halt was called for refreshments and to take up the Addingham men. It was very pleasing to see such a fine sample of manhood all enrolled in their country’s call. Ilkley Brass Band headed the company from Ilkley to the outskirts of the village.

25 December 1914

BOLTON ABBEY – Soldiers Home on Leave: Wedding Bells

Some few weeks ago, after a recruiting meeting held at Addingham we announced in these columns “Well done Bolton Abbey,” the reason of which was the splendid response of Bolton Abbey young men to the call of Lord Kitchener. During the past week these same young men have been spending six days leave from camp at home and elsewhere. The ‘elsewhere’ may be described as honeymoons in three cases. The ceremonies were performed in each case on Saturday. Private Jack Mitchell, eldest son of Mr. J. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, was married at Burnsall to Miss May Mason, youngest daughter of Mr. W.J. Mason, Grammar School, Burnsall. Miss Annie Mitchell, sister of the bridegroom, was bridesmaid, the ‘best man’ being Corporal Walter Bradley (Ilkley), a member of the same regiment (Duke of Wellington’s), who joined Kitchener’s Army and went with the same company as Private Mitchell. The ceremony, which was a very quiet one, was conducted by the Rector of Burnsall, Rev. W.J. Stavert. The other marriages were of Private Norman and Private Walter Nelson, second and third sons of Mr. Tom Nelson, of Summersgale Farm, Beamsley, whose three sons joined the colours the same day. These two decided to make a double wedding, and it took place at Skipton Registry Office. Private Norman Nelson married Miss Phoebe Hudson, the youngest daughter of Mr. A. Hudson, Broadshaw, and Private Walter Nelson married Miss Annie Ward, only daughter of the late Mr. G. Ward, and Mrs. J. Fowler, Bent Hall. The three gallant soldiers, who look remarkably well, left Bolton Abbey on Monday morning to return to camp.

18 January 1918

BOLTON ABBEY – DEATH OF THE DUKE’S HEAD FORESTER

Death has removed one of Bolton Abbey’s best known and highly respected residents in the person of Mr. John Mitchell, head forester to the Duke of Devonshire. Deceased, who was 64 years of age, passed away on Friday morning at his residence, Strid Cottage. He had a seizure on Monday evening, and never recovered. Mr. Mitchell was a native of Lentrelham [Lintrathen?], Kerriemuir, Forfarshire. Previous to coming to Bolton Abbey as head man for the Duke of Devonshire he was employed on the estates of the late Sir Thomas Gladstone and Sir Gordon Cumming, at Altyre, Aberdeenshire. He was held in high esteem by his fellow workers, and all who came in contact with him. His wife predeceased him eight years ago. He leaves two sons and four daughters to mourn his loss. Both of the sons are serving their country and are in France, John being in the Military Police, and William with the Scots Guards.

The funeral took place at the Abbey on Tuesday afternoon, and was largely attended by relations and friends…

[Father of Lance-Sergeant John Mitchell and Private William Young Mitchell.]

25 January 1918

BEAMSLEY – On Leave

The following Bolton Abbey soldiers are home on leave:– Allan Newall, Arthur Holmes, Herbert Maude and John Mitchell.

04 October 1918

MITCHELL – Lance-Sergeant J. Mitchell, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, eldest son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, Bolton Abbey, killed in France by a sniper September 21st, 1918, aged 36 years.

04 October 1918

BOLTON ABBEY FAMILY'S DOUBLE BEREAVEMENT

We regret to record the death (the news of which arrived during the past week) of Lance Sergeant J. Mitchell, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, and Private W. Mitchell, Scots Guards, sons of the late Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, Bolton Abbey. The former was killed by a sniper, and his brother died of wounds in hospital in France.

Lance-Sergeant J. Mitchell was an old Skipton Grammar School boy. He was one of the first to enlist from the parish of Bolton Abbey, joining Kitchener’s Army in September 1914. He went to France in July 1915, came to England wounded in September 1915, returned to France in February 1916, was then transferred into the Military Police, and was with that unit until about three weeks ago, when he rejoined his old battalion, the Duke of Wellington’s. He was killed by a sniper on September 21st 1918. The following is the letter received by his wife on Saturday morning:–

“Dear Mrs. Mitchell, – I do not know whether you have had any news from anyone concerning your husband, Lance Sergeant Mitchell, but feel it my duty to write and inform you that he was killed about 2 a.m. on Saturday, 21st September. He was carrying out a very important duty in conducting two officers of the Machine Gun Corps to another part of our line to which he knew the best way, and it was while returning with the officers that he was caught by a sniper’s bullet, being instantly killed, the officers managing to get back in safety. The other two officers of our Company, Captain Sinclair, Jim Bird, and myself, were terribly cut up on hearing the sad news. Mr. Bird went out with Sergeant Harris, found his body and collected his personal effects which they brought back to our dug-out. Just where he was killed was a very dangerous place, and nothing further could be done at the time. About 5 a.m. the same morning, Captain Sinclair, Jim Bird and myself were all three wounded by one shell, and had to get away to the dressing station. Sergeant Harris was also wounded shortly afterwards. Under the circumstances I regret I am unable to give you any further particulars, and can only convey to you my very deepest sympathy. May God give you strength to bear your great loss. Your husband was loved by everyone and will be missed by all in the company. He had only been promoted from Lance Corporal to Lance Sergeant a week previous for good work, and during an attack which we made a few days before he did magnificent work. I only arrived here this morning, and have written you as soon as possible. Yours sincerely, H. Wood, Second-Lieutenant.”

The letter was written from Hyde Park Hospital, Plymouth. Sergeant Mitchell, prior to enlisting, was under his father, the late head forester on the Duke of Devonshire’s estate, whom he was going to succeed after the war was over as head forester. He was assistant forester at Hornby Castle, and also on the Marr Brodsworth Estate. Sergeant Mitchell leaves a wife and one child. His age was 36 years.

Private W. Mitchell, Scots Guards, was educated at the Keighley Trades and Grammar School. Like his brother he answered the call in the early stages of the war. He joined September 1914, went to France February 1915, was wounded and came to England August 1915, returned to France March 1916, was again wounded and sent home July 1917; returned to France, December 1917, was wounded September 18th, 1918, and died in hospital from wounds September 20th.

The following letter was received from the Sister of the hospital:– “I am sorry to tell you that your brother, Private Mitchell, was badly wounded in the face, hand and knee and gassed, and was admitted to our hospital on the 18th inst. Everything possible was done for him, but we could not save his life. He died yesterday at 3 p.m. He was in a comfortable bed, in a nice ward, and had every attention, and he was operated on by a very good surgeon. He will be buried to-day by the Church of England padre in the Military Cemetery at Boycelles with military honours. I cut off a piece of his hair, which I enclose.–I am, yours truly, K. E. Flower, Sister, I/c 19 C.C.S.”

Private Mitchell served his time as a mechanical engineer. He was with the firm of Messrs. Brown and Co., Clydesdale Works, Glasgow, up to enlisting. His age was 30 years, and he was unmarried.

The two brothers were very smart men, bore excellent characters, and were greatly respected in the parish, and will be greatly missed.

Great sympathy is felt for all the members of the family, this being the third bereavement they have been called upon to bear during the present year. Their father died in January last.

18 October 1918

BOLTON ABBEY – Memorial Service

An impressive service was held on Sunday afternoon at Bolton Abbey Church in memory of Sergeant J. Mitchell, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, and Private W. Mitchell, Scots Guards, brothers, whose death took place within a day of each other, as reported in the ‘Herald’ a fortnight ago. As the large congregation assembled, the Abbey organist, Mr. E.E. Moore, played ‘O Rest in the Lord,’ and ‘He that shall endure to the end.’ The service was conducted by the rector (the Rev. Cecil Tomlinson), and the choir led the singing, which included the 90th Psalm, and the hymns ‘My God, My Father while I stray,’ ‘Peace, Perfect Peace,’ and ‘They whose course on earth is o’er.’ The Rector preached from the words, “He that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live.” The members of the family present were Mrs. J. Mitchell (widow), Miss and Miss Bella Mitchell (sisters), Mr. and Mrs. J. Throup (brother-in-law and sister), Mr. and Mrs. W. Watson (brother-in-law and sister), Mr. T. Young (uncle), Mr. and Mrs. Mason (father and mother-in-law). Among the great assembly were noticeable the three oldest members of the estate who had worked under the deceased soldiers’ father for nearly thirty years, and who had hoped to have finished their time under his son, viz., Mr. Sylvester Lister, Mr. John Holmes and Mr. Harry Holmes. The service concluded with the 'Dead March' in ‘Saul.’

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24 December 1914

BOLTON ABBEY – MARRIAGE OF RECRUITS

It will be remembered how well the Bolton Abbey young men responded to their country’s call at the Addingham recruiting meeting about three months ago. During the past week several of these men have been at home on leave, and during their visit three of them have got married and returned to camp. The marriages took place on Saturday last. Private Jack Mitchell, eldest son of Mr. J. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, was married at Burnsall Church, the bride being Miss May Mason, youngest daughter of Mr. W. Mason, of the Grammar School, Burnsall. She was attended by one bridesmaid, Miss Annie Mitchell (sister of the bridegroom). Corporal Walter Bradley (Ilkley), of the same regiment as Mr. Mitchell (the Duke of Wellington’s) was best man. Both bridegroom and best man were in uniform. The ceremony, which was very quiet, was conducted by the Vicar of Burnsall (Rev. W.J. Stavert). The other wedding, which was a double one, took place at Skipton, the contracting parties being two brothers, Private Walter and Private Norman Nelson, second and third sons of Mr. Tom Nelson, Summersgale Farm, Beamsley. The bride of Private Walter Nelson was Miss Annie Ward, only daughter of the late Mr. G. Ward and Mrs. J. Fowler, Bent Hill, whilst the bride of Private Norman Nelson was Miss Phoebe Hudson, youngest daughter of Mr. A. Hudson, Broadshaw. The three bridegrooms met at Bolton Abbey on Monday morning, and after receiving the hearty good wishes of a large number of friends, departed by the 11.11 train back to camp and duty.

18 January 1918

BOLTON ABBEY

DEATH OF THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE’S HEAD FORESTER

We regret to announce the death of Mr. J. Mitchell, of Strid Cottage, Bolton Abbey, head forester to the Duke of Devonshire on His Grace’s Bolton Abbey estate, after a brief illness of only a few days. Mr. Mitchell had a seizure on Monday of last week and died on Friday at the age of 64. Mr. Mitchell was a native of Tentrethan, Kerrimuir, Forfarshire, and was taught forestry in Edinburgh and Carlisle nurseries, also on the estates of Sir Thomas Gladstone and Sir Gordon Cummings, Altyre, Aberdeenshire, where he met his late wife, Miss A. Young, daughter of Mr. W. Young, East Quarter, Glasford, whom he married in 1881. He leaves six children – four daughters and two sons. The two sons, Pte. J. Mitchell, Military Police, and Pte. W. Mitchell, Scots Guards, are both serving at the front. Mr. Mitchell came to Bolton Abbey in March 1880, so that had he lived till March he would have been on the estate 38 years. The funeral took place at Bolton Abbey Church on Tuesday, and was largely attended, many coming from the adjoining parishes to pay their last tribute. The service was conducted by the rector (Rev. G. Tomlinson). The principal mourners were Miss Mitchell, Miss B. Mitchell (daughters), Mr. and Mrs. J. Throup (daughter and son-in-law), Mr. Young (brother-in-law), Mr. Frost and Mr. Watson (friends). Others present were: Dr. Bates, Dr. Crabtree, Mr. and Mrs. A. Downs, Mr. and Mrs. J. Hagar, Mr. and Mrs. W.B. Lawson, Mr. and Mrs. C. Hustwick, Mrs. W. Whittaker, Mrs. Rooes, and Messrs. W.A. Simpson, R. Simpson, A. Davy, J. Cockshott, H. Carr, G. Demain, W. Demaine, G. Petyte, W. Hartley, H. Hartley, G. Wilson, T. Young, W. Moorhouse, R. Hagar, G. Almack, A. Green (Silsden), J. Hudson, T. Larkin, A. Fairburn, R. Haythornthwaite, W. Leech, J.T. Sutcliffe, E. Moorhouse, T. Brown, T. Moon, S. Lister (Barden), Reynoldson, and G. Atkinson. Floral tributes were sent by ‘Jen, Belle and Will,’ ‘Jack and Moll,’ ‘Jack and Mary,’ Mr. and Mrs. A. Green (Silsden), Mr. and Mrs. Downs, ‘Will and Annie,’ Mr. And Mrs. J. Green, Mr. and Mrs. S. Lister (Barden Tower), Mr. and Mrs. Watson (Ilkley), and the woodmen.

04 October 1918

MITCHELL – No. 12888 L.-Sergt. J. Mitchell, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, eldest son of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, Bolton Abbey, killed in France by a sniper, Sept. 21st, 1918, aged 36 years.

04 October 1918

Bolton Abbey Family’s Double Bereavement

The death has taken place in France of two brothers, Lance-Sergt. J. Mitchell, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who was killed by a sniper’s bullet on Sept. 21st, and Pte. W. Mitchell, Scots Guards, who died in hospital of wounds on Sept. 20th. They were sons of the late Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, Strid Cottage, Bolton Abbey; both of them enlisting in the early stages of the war, and having had over four years’ service. Sergt. Mitchell was 36 years of age and Pte. Mitchell 30.

Lance-Sergt. J. Mitchell, who was an old Skipton Grammar School boy, was one of the first batch of eight to enlist from Bolton Abbey. Joining Kitchener’s Army in September, 1914, he went out to France in July, 1915; came home wounded in September, 1915; returned to France in February, 1916; was then transferred into the Military Police, and served with that unit until he rejoined his old battalion, the Duke of Wellington’s, in August last. He was killed on Sept. 21st. The following letter has been received by his wife:– “Dear Mrs. Mitchell, – I do not know if you have yet had any news from anyone in the battalion concerning your husband, Lce.-Sergt Mitchell, but 1 feel it my duty to write and inform you that he was killed about 2 a.m. on Saturday, the 21st Sept. He was carrying out a very important duty in conducting two officers of the Machine Gun Corps to another part of our line, to which he knew the best way, and it was while returning with the officers that he was caught by a sniper’s bullet, being instantly killed, the officers managing to get back in safety. The other two officers of our company, Capt. Sinclair, Lieut. Bird, and myself were terribly cut up on hearing the sad news. Mr. Bird went out with Sergt. Harris, found his body, and collected his personal effects, which they brought back to our dugout. Just where he was killed was a very dangerous place, and nothing further could be done at the time. About 3 a.m. the same morning, Capt. Sinclair, Lieut. Bird, and myself were all three wounded by one shell;, and had to get away to the dressing station. Sergt. Harris was also wounded shortly afterwards. Under the circumstances I regret I am unable to give you any further particulars, and can only convey to you my very deepest sympathy. May God give you strength to bear your great loss. Your husband was loved by everyone, and will he missed by all in the company. He had only been promoted from lance-corporal to lance-sergeant a week previous for good work, and during an attack which we made a few days before he did magnificent work. I only arrived here this morning, and have written you as soon as possible. Yours sincerely, H. Wood, Second Lieutenant.” The letter was written from Hyde Park Hospital, Plymouth.

Pte. W. Mitchell was educated at the Keighley Trade and Grammar School. He enlisted in September, 1914, and went out to France in February, 1915, was wounded and came to London in August, 1915; returned to France in March, 1916: was again wounded July, 1917, and came to England, returning for the last time to France in December, 1917; he was wounded on Sept. 18th, and died in hospital in France from wounds Sept. 20th, the day before his brother was killed. The following letter has been received from the sister at the hospital:– “I am sorry to tell you that your brother, Pte. Mitchell, 17091, was badly wounded in the face, hand, and knee, and gassed, and was admitted to our hospital on the 18th inst. Everything possible was done for him, but we could not save his life. He died yesterday at 3 p.m. He was in a comfortable bed in a nice ward, and had every attention, and he was operated on by a very good surgeon. He will be buried today by the Church of England Padre in the Military Cemetery at Boycelles with military honour. I cut off a piece of his hair, which I enclose. I am, yours truly, K.E. Flower.”

The two brothers were very smart and capable men, with excellent characters, and had bright futures before them. Lce.-Sergt Mitchell had learned forestry at Little and Valentine’s Nurseries, Carlisle, had been assistant forester at Hornby Castle, and also on the Marr Brodsworth. Estate, and had he lived he was to succeed his father as head forester on the Duke of Devonshire’s estate at Bolton Abbey. Sergt. Mitchell was married. and leaves a wife and one child. Pte. Mitchell had served his time as a mechanical engineer, and up to enlisting was with the well-known firm of Messrs. Brown and Co., Clydesdale Works, Glasgow; he was not married. Great sympathy is felt for the family, as this is the third bereavement they have been called upon to bear during the present year; their father died in January.

18 October 1918

BOLTON ABBEY

On Sunday a memorial service was held in the Abbey Church in memory of Sergt. J. Mitchell, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, and Pte. W. Mitchell, Scots Guards, whose deaths took place within a day of each other, as reported in the ‘Pioneer’ on Oct. 4th. A large company attended to pay their last tribute. The organist, Mr. E.E. Moore, played as voluntaries, ‘O rest in the Lord’ and ‘He that shall endure to the end.’ The Rector, Rev. C. Tomlinson, conducted the service, and preached from John II, part of 25th and 26th verses. At the conclusion of the service the organist played the ‘Dead March’ in ‘Saul,’ the congregation standing.

06 December 1918

Bolton Abbey and the War

The ecclesiastical parish of Bolton Abbey, which includes Beamsley, Barden, Bolton Abbey, Halton East & Hazlewood with Storiths, has worked with untiring energy and zeal since the commencement of the war. The following amounts have been raised for War Charities:– By collections in the Abbey church, £38 2s. 11d; by collections in Beamsley Wesleyan Chapel, £12 8s. 1½d; by collections in Barden Church, £3s. 3d [£3 3s]; by the Bolton Abbey working party, £385: by concert, arranged by Mrs. Herbert Carr £18 18s.; making a grand total of £459 15s. 3½d.

The roll of honour contains 97 names; eleven have given their lives in the great cause. These are:– Sylvester Hartley, John Fawcett, Basil Newall, Gill Morell, Herbert Holmes, George Binns, John Thomas Ideson, John Mitchell, William Mitchell, William Johnson and James Atkins. Two are at present prisoners in Germany, Dixon Robinson, Allan Hudson; three have been discharged as unfit, Alex Nelson, Norman Nelson, Frank Higgins; and one presumed killed but not definitely notified, Sec. Lieutenant C. Boothman, R.F.C. Each Christmas the lads from Bolton Abbey have received a parcel, and the greatest credit is due to the committee and Mrs. Downs, who has been secretary, for their labour of love.

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