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Richard HARRISON

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Surname: HARRISON

Forename(s): Richard

Place of Birth: Carleton-in-Craven, Yorkshire

Service No: ---

Rank: Surgeon

Regiment / Corps / Service: Mercantile Marine

Battalion / Unit: S.S. 'Umgeni' (London)

Division: ---

Age: ---

Date of Death: 1917-11-09

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: ---

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: TOWER HILL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial(s): Not Listed (View Names Not Listed on a Local War Memorial)

Additional Information:

Richard (born 17 June 1855) was the son of Joseph and Grace Harrison, née Lowcock. Joseph was born at Earby and Grace at Carleton-in-Craven, Yorkshire.

1861 Carleton-in-Craven, Yorkshire Census: Farm House - Richard Harrison, aged 5 years, born Carlton, son of Joseph Harrison, Widower. [Grace died in 1858; Joseph then married Anne Hartley in 1862.]

1871 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 24, Newmarket Street - Richard Harrison, aged 15 years, born Skipton. Medical Pupil. [Richard was boarding with William Macnab, Medical Practitioner.]

1891 Willesden, Middlesex Census: Park House, Church End - Richard Harrison, aged 34 years, born Skipton, Yorkshire. General Practitioner. [Richard is described as a visitor to Leonard Roberts, General Practitioner.]

Richard was married to Helen Alicia Windham in 1898. At the time of his marriage, in London, Richard was a resident of Burnham Overy, Norfolk.

1901 London Census: 18, Mecklenburgh Square - Richard Harrison, aged 42 years, born Skipton, Yorkshire. Physician and Surgeon. Husband of Helena Harrison.

Helena died in 1908?; Richard then married Katherina Dantermann in 1913. Katherina was born in Bavaria, Germany, c. 1879.

Richard is named on the Crew List of the S.S. 'Highland Brae' 31/12/14 - 00/00/1915. The ‘Highland Brae,’ a passenger ship, was captured by the German auxiliary cruiser ‘Kronprinz Wilhelm’ in the Atlantic on the 14 January 1915. Those on board were transferred to the Bremen collier ‘Holger.’ The ‘Highland Brae’ was kept afloat and scuttled on 31 January. Afterwards the raider’s prisoners were taken to Buenos Ayres, which they reached on the 17 February. From there they returned to England. The 'Holger' was interned by the Argentine Government.

The following text is courtesy of Brian Watson of the Benjidog Tower Hill website: http://www.benjidog.co.uk/Tower%20Hill/WW1%20Umgeni%20to%20Van%20Stirum.html#Umgeni.
Umgeni was a 2,662 GRT steam cargo ship completed in 1898 by Laing James & Sons Ltd. for Bullard, King & Co. She departed the Clyde on 7 November 1917 bound for Liverpool and Lagos but was last contacted on 9 November and not seen again. She is understood to have foundered in a gale somewhere to the West of Ireland.

Data Source: Commonwealth War Graves Commission

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record: ---

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No photo available for this Soldier
Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Mercantile Marine

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Mercantile Marine

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

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Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HARRISON

Forename(s): Richard

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Surgeon

Regiment: Mercantile Marine

Unit: "Umgeni" (London)

Age: 58

Awards:

Died Date: 09/11/1917

Additional Information: Husband of Katherina Harrison (nee Dantermann), of "Acacia," Clifton Rd., Sidcup, Kent. Born at Skipton.

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1875

HARRISON Joseph. Effects under £16,000. 28 January. The Will of Joseph Harrison late of Carleton near Skipton in the County of York Farmer who died 17 October 1874 at Carleton was proved at Wakefield by John Turner of Barnoldswick in the said County Tailor and Draper and William Harrison Cattle Dealer the Son and Ann Harrison Widow the Relict both of Skipton the Executors.

‘The Manchester Courier’ (23 March 1915)

IN A GERMAN RAIDER

WORK OF THE KRONPRINZ WILHELM

“The Times” Buenos Ayres correspondent writes: I have been able to gather from passengers on board the Highland Brae, who have just arrived here after having been detained on German boats since January 14th last, some details of the experiences through which they have gone since the Highland Brae was captured by the German commerce raider Kronprinz Wilhelm, just north of the Equator and some 500 miles from the Brazilian coast.

On that date the Kronprinz Wilhelm stopped the Highland Brae by a shot across the bows, sent a prize crew on board, formally taking possession and hauling down the British flag without, however, replacing it by the German flag. She then turned her attention to the three-masted schooner Wilfred M., from Barbados, which had unwittingly been a witness of the capture, and after transferring to herself the crew of 20 odd hands, sank her by drawing off and ramming her at full speed.

Passengers, officers, and their luggage, together with mails, were transferred to the Kronprinz Wilhelm, where were found, in addition to the crew of the Wilfred M., the officers and crew of two other vessels–the Potaro, captured two days previously, and the Hemisphere, on December 28th. Subsequently the Norwegian-owned’ four-masted barque St. Martha was captured and sunk by gunfire. She carried some 3,000 tons of wheat, stated to be for the British Government.

The Highland Brae kept company with the Kronprinz Wilhelm until January 31st, during which time she was thoroughly stripped, and was ultimately sunk. All the accounts are unanimous in stating that everything possible in the circumstances was done for the passengers and officers. One of the passengers states confidently that after very careful observation he puts the armament of the Kronprinz William [sic] at a total of seven guns, of which four were 7-pounders, two fore and two aft, one Maxim, and two 4.7’s, which were useless, having no ammunition.

The Kronprinz Wilhelm left New York without passengers apparently two or three days before the declaration of war between Great Britain and Germany, but after the declaration of war between Germany and Russia, she headed for a German port, but finding the North Sea barred to her, turned into the South Atlantic, bent on commerce raiding. It is stated that for a day or two she was practically a derelict, having consumed all her coal, but she fell in with the Karlsruhe, and was set on her feet again. It is also said that once she was chased by H.M.S. Berwick, which fired twice at her, one of the shells passing between the funnels and the other hitting and partly demolishing the bridge.

‘The Scotsman’ (18 January 1918)

MISSING BRITISH STEAMER

LLOYD’S AGENCY states that nothing has been heard of the British steamer Umgeni since she left Liverpool at the end of October, and subsequently sailed from the Clyde at the beginning of November, excepting that several bodies, supposed to be those members of the crew, are reported to have been picked up.

‘Yorkshire Post’ (18 January 1918)

Lloyd’s Agency states that nothing has been heard of the steamer Umgeni since she left Liverpool at the end of October, and subsequently sailed from the Clyde at the beginning of November, excepting several bodies, supposed to be those of members of the crew, are reported to have been washed up. The Umgeni, owned by Messrs. Bullard, King, and Co., London, is of 2,662 gross tons, and was built in 1898.

‘Western Times’ (7 February 1918)

Shipping News

Lloyd’s report that the schooner, Lapwing of Arbroath, 95 tons, Waterford for Cardiff, and the Umgeni, of London, 2,522 tons gross, the Clyde for Lagos, are considered very much overdue.

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SMS ‘Kronprinz Wilhelm’ in a U.S.A. port, c. April 1915

SMS ‘Kronprinz Wilhelm’ in a U.S.A. port, c. April 1915

The ship was interned for two years, then served in the U.S.A. Navy 1917-1919 as USS ‘Von Steuben’

Source: Unknown

Tower Hill Memorial: Umgeni

Tower Hill Memorial: Umgeni

Courtesy of Brian Watson of the Benjidog Tower Hill website

Tower Hill Memorial: Umgeni

Tower Hill Memorial: Umgeni

Courtesy of Brian Watson of the Benjidog Tower Hill website

Tower Hill Memorial: Umgeni

Tower Hill Memorial: Umgeni

Courtesy of Brian Watson of the Benjidog Tower Hill website

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