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Thomas CORK

Main CPGW Record

Surname: CORK

Forename(s): Thomas

Place of Birth: Skipton, Yorkshire

Service No: 357331

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: King’s (Liverpool Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 1/10th (Scottish) Battalion

Division: 55th (West Lancashire) Division

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1916-08-16

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: XXXIV. N. 14.

CWGC Cemetery: SERRE ROAD CEMETERY NO.2

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Thomas Cork was the son of Frederick and Mary Ann Cork, née Truman and brother of L/Corporal John Cork (18243) (q.v.). Their father was born at Skipton, Yorkshire and mother at Glasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland. Thomas and John’s sister, Edith Maud, married Private Joseph Henry Bowers Whitehead (267012) (q.v.). They were also related, through their father, to T/2nd Lieutenant George Cork Dalgoutte (q.v.).

1901 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 9, Dawson Street - Thomas Cork, aged 9 years, born Skipton, son of Frederick and Mary A. Cork.

1911 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 9, Dawson Street - Thomas Cork, aged 19 years, born Skipton, son of Frederick and Mary Ann Cork.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Thomas Cork, 6244 & 357331, Liverpool Regiment.

Thomas is commemorated in the Rolls of Honour at the Scottish National War Memorial, Edinburgh.

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

CORK, Tom, aged 24, Liverpool Scottish, son of Mr. Fred Cork, hairdresser, Sheep Street, Skipton, believed killed in action, 1916.

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Private Thomas CORK

Private Thomas CORK

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: King’s (Liverpool Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: King’s (Liverpool Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 55th (West Lancashire) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 55th (West Lancashire) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: CORK

Forename(s): Thomas

Born: Skipton, Yorks

Residence: Liverpool

Enlisted: Liverpool

Number: 357331

Rank: Private

Regiment: King's (Liverpool Regiment)

Battalion: 10th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 17/07/17 [sic]

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: CORK

Forename(s): Thomas

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 357331

Rank: Private

Regiment: The King's (Liverpool Regiment)

Unit: 10th Bn.

Age: 24

Awards:

Died Date: 16/08/1916

Additional Information: Son of Fred Cork, of 91, Gargrave Rd., Skipton, Yorks.

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1935

CORK Frederick of Woodview Gargrave-road Skipton Yorkshire died 2 August 1935 Probate London 6 September to Edith Maude Whitehead widow William Trueman Cork hairdresser and Arthur Smith estate agent. Effects £5936 12s.9d.

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Serre Road Cemetery No.2

Serre Road Cemetery No.2

CWGC Headstone

Frederick Cork

Frederick Cork

Frederick Cork, the father of Thomas and John Cork

Courtesy of John Cork

William Truman Cork

William Truman Cork

William Truman Cork, the brother of Thomas and John Cork (William served in the Great War with the King's Royal Rifle Corps and was taken prisoner in 1918)

Courtesy of John Cork

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17 November 1916

UNKNOWN FATE OF THREE SKIPTONIANS – A TRAGIC STORY: Pte. T. Cork Believed to Have Been Killed

Another Skipton soldier, about whom no definite official news can be obtained, is Private Tom Cork, the oldest of the three soldier sons of Mr. F. Cork, hairdresser, Sheep Street. News from other sources, however, does not give much hope, and the utmost sympathy is felt by a large circle of friends for Mr. Cork and his family. The information which has been received by Mr. Cork concerning his son makes up one of the many tragic stories which the War has produced.

Sometime in August, apparently about the middle of the month, a signaller in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers noticed a pocket wallet by the side of a dead soldier. In the hope of forwarding it to the relatives of the man he took the wallet and later sent it to an Oswestry jeweller named Rowe, whose visiting card was in the wallet, along with a number of photographs and other incidentals. Mr. Rowe was unable to recognise any of the people in the photographs, but noticing the name of Mr. Pitchforth, photographer, of Saltburn, on one of the photographs, he forwarded the wallet to the latter. Mr. Pitchforth at once identified the photograph that he had taken as that of Mr. P. Cork, of Skipton, and communicated with the latter. Subsequently Mr. Cork obtained the wallet from Mr. Rowe and recognised it as that of his son Tom. He was also able to recognise the contents. He wrote to the soldier who had picked up the wallet and the latter replied to the effect that he had no doubt that the man who held the wallet was the owner.

Accompanying the wallet when it was sent to Mr. Rowe was the following touching letter written by the soldier who picked it up:– “I came across this little pocket wallet by the side of one of our fallen heroes on the battlefield. I cannot find any address enclosed only Mr. Rowe’s card, so I am sending it on to him in the hope of it reaching its proper quarters. I daresay by this time you have been informed from the right source. May I add my deepest sympathy to you? I think that this little pocket wallet he (the owner) kept through all his entire duties to the bitter end will still be kept by the ones he loved so well.”

After receiving the wallet Mr. Cork communicated with the Territorial Force Records Office and the War Office, and from the former received word that his son was still at a place not stated, suffering from wounds reported on August 18th, while the War Office’s report stated that Pte. Cork was reported wounded and missing.

Twenty-four years of age, Pte. Cork was apprenticed to the printing trade with Messrs. Edmondson and Co., Skipton, and after finishing his apprenticeship he obtained a position with a Middlesbrough firm of printers. Subsequently he entered the employ of a Liverpool firm. He enlisted at Liverpool in the King’s Own Liverpool Scottish, and went out to the Front in July last. He did part of his training at Oswestry, and Mr. Rowe, to whom the pocket wallet was first sent, said that he saw him on at least one occasion in his shop. Mr. Rowe had taken a great deal of trouble to solve the mystery, and his kind and sympathetic letter has been greatly appreciated by Mr. Cork.

Two other sons of Mr. Cork are also at the Front – Pte. John Cork, who is with the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, and Signaller W. Cork, who is with the King’s Royal Rifles.

27 July 1917

CORK – Previously reported missing since August 16th 1916, now officially reported killed in action on that date, Private Thomas Cork, 10th Liverpool Scottish Regiment, eldest son of Mr. Fred Cork, hairdresser and tobacconist, Sheep Street, Skipton.

27 July 1917

THE LATE PTE. T. CORK, SKIPTON

Mr. F. Cork, hairdresser, Sheep Street, Skipton, has received an official intimation this week that the Army Council now conclude that his oldest son, Pte. Thomas Cork, was killed on August 16th 1916, or since. The information which Mr. Cork originally received concerning his son makes up a very tragic story. About the middle of August last year, a signaller in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers noticed a pocket wallet by the side of a dead soldier. In the hope of forwarding it to the relatives of the man he took the wallet and later sent it to an Oswestry jeweller named Rowe, whose visiting card, along with a number of photographs, he found in the wallet. Mr. Rowe was unable to recognise any of the people on the photographs, but noticing the name of Mr. Pitchforth, photographer, of Saltburn, on one of the photographs, he forwarded the wallet to the latter. Mr. Pitchforth identified the photograph that he had taken as that of Mr. F. Cork, of Skipton, and communicated with the latter who obtained the wallet from Mr. Rowe and recognised it as that belonging to his son Thomas. Subsequently, Mr. Cork communicated with the military authorities, but he could receive no definite information before this week.

Deceased was 24 years of age, and was apprenticed to the printing trade with Messrs. Edmondson and Co., Skipton. After finishing his apprenticeship he worked for a Middlesbrough firm of printers, and afterwards entered the employ of a Liverpool firm. He enlisted at Liverpool in the King’s Own Liverpool Scottish, and went to the Front in July 1916.

24 August 1917

SKIPTON TRADESMAN’S SECOND BEREAVEMENT – LANCE CORPORAL JOHN CORK

We regret to announce that Mr. Fred Cork, tobacconist, &c., Sheep Street, Skipton, has had another son – Lance Corporal John Cork – of the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment killed in action. Twenty-four years of age, he enlisted in January 1916 and went out to France in June of the same year. He was wounded in the head, shoulder, and thigh on the 5th of January last, and on his recovery, after a month at the Bristol Hospital, he returned to France. He was for many years a member of the Gargrave Road Primitive Methodist Church Choir. He served his apprenticeship with Mr. Walter Shuttleworth, grocer, Keighley Road, Skipton, and prior to enlisting was in the employ of Mr. Carr, grocer, Skipton.

Second-Lieut. V. F. de W. W. Vredenburg, in a letter to Lance Corporal Cork’s sister, states:– “It is with deepest regret that I have to inform you of the death in action of your brother, Lance Corporal Cork. He took part in a raid on the enemy trenches on the night of August 9th, and was killed during the advance. His death was absolutely instantaneous. May I extend to you the deepest sympathy of the officers and men of his company in your grief. I looked upon him as an exceedingly capable soldier who did his duty at all times uncomplainingly and well.”

Mr. Cork had another son – Private Tom Cork – killed in action in August, 1916; and he has also another son – Rifleman Willie Cork – serving with the King’s Royal Rifles in France.

Deep sympathy is felt with Mr. and Mrs. Cork and family in this their second loss.

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17 November 1916

SKIPTON SOLDIER BELIEVED KILLED

Pte. Tom Cork (24), son of Mr. Fred Cork, hairdresser, Sheep Street, Skipton, is believed to have been killed in action.

Pte. Cork served his apprenticeship to the printing trade with Messrs. Edmondson and Co., High Street, Skipton, on the completion of which he went to Middlesbrough and then to Liverpool. Whist at Liverpool he joined the King’s Own Liverpool Scottish, and did his training at various places, including Oswestry, going out to France in July 1916. Some time ago a Signaller in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers picked up a pocket wallet laid near to a dead soldier on the battlefield. The wallet was found to contain numerous photographs, and also a visiting card bearing the name of Mr. Rowe, jeweller, of Oswestry. With a view to finding the owner, the soldier forwarded the wallet to Mr. Rowe. The latter did not recognise any of the photographs, but noticed the name of Pitchforth, Saltburn, as the photographer on one of the cards, and in turn he communicated with him. Mr. Pitchforth was able to recognise one of the photographs as that of Pte. Cork’s father, and at once communicated with him. Mr. Cork then got in touch with Mr. Rowe, from whom he obtained the wallet which he at once recognised as belonging to his son. He then wrote to the soldier who had found it, and the soldier replied that he had no doubt that the man who held the wallet was the owner. Later Mr. Cork asked for information from the War Office, and he received a communication from the Territorial Force Records Office to the effect that Pte. Cork was ill at a place not stated, suffering from wounds reported on the 18th of August, while the War Office also reported him as wounded and missing. When the wallet was picked up by the Welsh Fusilier, he wrote the following letter to the parents to whom the wallet belonged:– “I came across this little pocket wallet by the side of one of our fallen heroes on the battlefield. I could not find any address enclosed, only Mr. Rowe’s card, so I am sending it on to him in the hope of it reaching its proper quarters. I dare say by this time you have been informed through the right source. I send my deepest sympathy to you, and I think this little pocket wallet he kept through the untiring duties to the bitter end will still be kept by the ones he loved so well.” The kindness of Mr. Rowe in doing all he could to find the owner of the wallet has been greatly appreciated by Mr. Cork and his family. They have two other sons serving, Pte. John Cork, with the Duke of Wellington’s, and Signaller W. Cork, with the Royal Rifles, and both are in France. Pte. Cork was a local preacher in connection with the Primitive Methodist denomination.

27 July 1917

CORK – Previously reported missing since August l6th, 1916, now officially reported killed in action on that date, Pte. Thomas Cork, l0th Liverpool Scottish Regiment, eldest son of Mr. Fred Cork, hairdresser and tobacconist, Sheep Street, Skipton.

27 July 1917

SKIPTON

PRIVATE TOM CORK OFFICIALLY REPORTED KILLED

Mr. Fred Cork, hairdresser, Sheep Street, received official information on Tuesday morning from the Territorial Record Office, Preston, to the effect that his son, Pte. Tom Cork, of the King’s Own Liverpool Scottish, who had previously been reported missing, was killed on August 16th 1916, or since.

Some time ago a Signaller in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers picked up a pocket wallet laid near to a dead soldier on the battlefield. The wallet was found to contain numerous photographs and also a visiting card bearing the name of Mr. Rowe, jeweller, of Oswestry. With a view to finding the owners the soldier forwarded the wallet to Mr. Rowe. The latter did not recognise any of the photographs, but noticed the name of Pitchforth, Saltburn, as the photographer on one of the cars and in turn he communicated with him. Mr. Pitchford was able to recognise one of the photographs as that of Pte. Cork’s father, and at once communicated with him. Mr. Cork then got in touch with Mr. Rowe, from whom he obtained the wallet which he at once recognised as belonging to his son. He then wrote to the soldier who found it and the soldier replied that he had no doubt that the man who held the wallet was the owner. Later Mr. Cork asked for information from the War Office, and he received a communication from the Territorial Force Record Office to the effect that Pte. Cork was ill at a place not stated, suffering from wounds reported on the 16th of August, while the War Office reported him as wounded and missing. When the wallet was picked up by the Welsh Fusilier he wrote the following letter to the parents to whom the wallet belonged:– “I came across this little pocket wallet by the side of one of our fallen heroes on the battlefield. I could not find any address enclosed, only Mr. Rowe’s card, so I am sending it to him in the hope of it reaching its proper quarters. I dare say by this time you have been informed through the right source. I send my deepest sympathy to you, and I think this little pocket wallet to be kept through the untiring duties to the bitter end will be still kept by the ones he loved so well.” The kindness of Mr. Rowe in doing all he could to find the owner of the wallet has been greatly appreciated by Mr. Cork and his family.

Pte. Cork served his apprenticeship to the printing trade with Messrs. Edmondson and Co, High Street, Skipton, on the completion of which he went to Middlesbrough and then to Liverpool. Whilst at Liverpool he joined the King’s Own Liverpool Scottish, and did his training at various places including Oswestry, going out to France in July, 1916.

Mr. Cork has two other sons serving, Pte. John Cork with the Duke of Wellington’s, and Signaller W. Cork with the Royal Rifles, and both are in France. Pte. Cork was a local preacher in connection with the Primitive Methodist denomination.

24 August 1917

MORE SKIPTON SOLDIERS KILLED

Lance-Corporal J. Cork

We regret to announce that Mr. Fred Cork, hairdresser, Sheep Street, Street, Skipton, has had another son – Lance-Corporal John Cork, of the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment – killed in action. Twenty-four years of age, he enlisted in January, 1916, and went out to France in June of the same year. He was wounded in the head, shoulder, and thigh on the 5th of January last, and on his recovery after a month at the Bristol Hospital, he returned to France. He was formerly a member of the Gargrave Road Primitive Methodist Church choir. He served his apprenticeship with Mr. Walter Shuttleworth, grocer, Keighley Road, Skipton, and prior to enlisting was in the employ of Messrs. G. E. Carr and Co., Ltd., grocers, Skipton.

Second-Lieutenant V. F. de W. W. Vredenburg, in a letter to Lance-Corporal Cork’s sister, states:– “1t is with deepest regret that I have to inform you of the death in action of your brother, Lance-Corporal Cork. He took part in a raid on the enemy trenches on the night of August 9th, and was killed during the advance. His death was absolutely instantaneous. May I extend to you my deepest sympathy of the officers and men of his company in your grief. I looked upon him as an exceedingly capable soldier who did his duty at all times uncomplainingly and well.”

Mr. Cork had another son – Pte. Tom Cork – killed in action in August, 1916, while he has also another son, Rifleman Willie Cork, serving with the King’s Royal Rifles in France. Much sympathy is felt with Mr. and Mrs. Cork and family in this their second loss.

31 May 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Skipton Prisoner of War

Pte. Willie Cork, of the King’s Royal Rifles, son of Mr. Fred Cork, hairdresser, Sheep Street, Skipton who has been reported missing since April 13th, is a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte. Cork, who is 21 years of age, enlisted when 19, and was formerly employed by his father. A brother, Pte. Tom Cork, of the King’s Liverpool Scottish Regiment, has been previously presumed killed after being missing, while another brother, Pte. John Cork, of the West Riding Regiment, has also been killed in action.

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