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Thomas UPTON

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Surname: UPTON

Forename(s): Thomas

Place of Birth: Glusburn, Yorkshire

Service No: 15886

Rank: Corporal

Regiment / Corps / Service: Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Battalion / Unit: 10th (Service) Battalion

Division: 19th (Western) Division

Age: ---

Date of Death: 1920-04-20

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: ---

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: SILSDEN (ST. JAMES) CHURCHYARD

Local War Memorial: SILSDEN, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Thomas Upton was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Upton, née Young and brother of Sergeant Jim Upton (265005) (q.v.). Their father was born at Idle, Yorkshire and mother at Ulverston, Lancashire. When their parents were married in 1885, Elizabeth was named as Elizabeth Young Riley.

1891 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 8, Westgate - Thomas Upton, aged 4 years, born Skipton, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Upton.

1901 Dalton-in-Furness, Lancashire Census: 5, Cardigan Terrace - Thomas Upton, aged 14 years, born Glusburn, Yorkshire, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Upton.

The British Army Service Record for Thomas Upton (7766) exists but may be incomplete. [Thomas, named as the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Upton of Browns Yard, Skipton, attested at Burnley on the 31 December 1902. He served with the 1st Bn East Lancashire Regiment and was ‘discharged having made a misstatement as to age’ on the 18 July 1903.]

Thomas was married to Ada Metcalfe in 1905 and was the brother-in-law of Private Joseph Metcalfe (14896) (q.v.) and Private John Thomas Metcalfe (24062) (q.v.).

1911 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 6, Lipton's Yard, Victoria Street - Thomas Upton, aged 24 years, born Glusburn, Yorkshire. [Thomas, was living with his parents, Thomas and Elizabeth Upton. His wife Ada and their two children were living with her mother at Skipton.]

The British Army Service Record for Thomas Upton (11880) exists but may be incomplete.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte & A/Cpl Thomas Upton, 11880 West Riding Regiment. Theatre of War first served in: 2B - Balkans. Date of entry therin: 7 July 1915. Deserted.

Thomas deserted from the 11th Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) on the 4 December 1915; he had served with the 8th Bn at Gallipoli. He enlisted as Thomas Young in another regiment (see both ‘Craven Herald’ and ‘West Yorkshire Pioneer’ of 25 May 1917). In the Silsden Roll of Honour he is named as Sergeant Thomas Upton, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (see below).

The British Army Service Record for Thomas Young (15886) exists but may be incomplete (this is Thomas Upton).

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Cpl Thomas Young, 15886, R. War. R.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: Cpl Thomas Young, 15886, 16th Bn R. War R.; 10th Bn R. War R.

Thomas was buried at Silsden, Yorkshire, on the 21 April 1920.

Data Source: Local War Memorial

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record: ---

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No photo available for this Soldier
Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 19th (Western) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 19th (Western) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: No entry in SDGW.

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Died How:

Theatre of War:

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: Not commemorated by the CWGC.

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View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

24 September 1915

WOUNDED SILSDEN CORPORAL

Corporal Tom Upton, of the 8th Duke of Wellington’s, West Riding Regiment, and of St. John’s Street, Silsden, has been home on sick leave for seven days after having been wounded whilst in action at the Dardanelles.

Corporal Upton, who was a reservist, said that at the outbreak of war he joined the 8th Battalion and was in training for some time at Grantham and Whitley camps, Surrey. He left England for the Dardanelles on July 3rd, arriving there on the 10th of that month. They then sailed from an island named Imbros to Suvla Bay on destroyers, and landed there the same night between 10-30 and 11 o’clock.

They got strict orders not to fire a shot before daybreak, but as they were leaving the destroyers the Turks commenced shelling them. They advanced about a mile alongside the sea shore and were marched along the neck of Salt Lake and came to a place about 800 yards long which they took to be solid ground. To their surprise, what appeared to be firm ground at first, turned out to be very treacherous, and quite a large number of them sank up to their waists in mud.

As they were extricating themselves from that awkward predicament the Turks commenced shelling them again, with the result that they lost pretty heavily. Corporal Upton described the scene as being like “hell upon earth.” There a captain named Leftsbridge – who deserved a Victoria Cross if ever a man did – came up and said “Come on Lads: it’s no use stopping here.” They made a charge and got half way up Chocolate Hill, as they called it. They did the best they could, but in spite of that the Turks commenced an enveloping movement, with the result that they had to retire to the beach.

There they stayed about half-an-hour, during which, time their Brigadier, General Hoggart, was killed. They again advanced and got half way up Chocolate Hill, but quickly shifted their position on to what was known as ‘W’ Hill again, where they lost a colonel and three good officers, as well as a large number of rank and file.

The Turks then commenced to charge them and they had a proper set to, but as they were outnumbered they had to fall back again. They then commenced singing “Are we downhearted,” to which the response came, “No, no, no.” He said he had been in some very desperate hand to hand fighting, and on one occasion, whilst they were going for more munitions and rations, they were heavily shelled by the enemy.

It was then that Corporal Upton was wounded on the right side and left foot. He was taken on board a trawler and removed to a place called Imbros, and was afterwards shifted on to a liner and went to Lemnos. He was later trans-shipped on to another vessel, and on their journey to England they called at Naples, where they had quite an ovation and were treated like gentlemen.

There they came across a number of Italians who cheered them again and again. Proceeding from Naples they made a stay at Gibraltar for about half an hour, from which place he was brought to Southampton, and then conveyed to Netley Hospital. He remained there for about a month, at the expiration of which he was granted sick leave.

Corporal Upton 1eft Silsden again Monday, when he journeyed to Lichfield to join the 11th second reserve battalion

25 May 1917

ANOTHER CHANCE – SILSDEN SOLDIER CHARGED WITH NEGLECT OF FAMILY

At Skipton Police Court on Monday, before Mr. Alg. Dewhurst, Thomas Upton, alias Thomas Young, described as a soldier of Silsden, was charged at the instance of the Skipton Board of Guardians with failing to maintain his wife and children.

Mr. R. Knowles, clerk to the Skipton Board of Guardians, said that the prisoner’s four children became chargeable on March 12th, 1916, and were still chargeable to the Skipton Union, the Guardians of which had spent in the relief of the wife and children £30 3s. 5d. Prisoner first joined the Army in the name of Upton, but afterwards – in February of last year – he enlisted in another regiment in the name of Young as a single man. Since he changed his name there had been no separation allowance from prisoner to his wife and children, and in consequence the Guardians had incurred the expense of £30 3s. 5d. The Silsden Distress Committee had also been contributing towards the maintenance of this family, but they ceased to make such contributions when they found that the separation allowance was not coming through because of the man changing his name. In fairness to the prisoner he would like to say that his (Mr. Knowles) view was that the wife had not done everything she ought to have done. She had not kept her home clean and the children had not been properly attended to, the woman’s excuse for her neglect being that she had no money to do it with. In the name of Young prisoner had made progress in the Army and one could not help but feel sorry for him. However, prisoner ought to make his position clear to the Army Authorities in such a way that his wife and children could receive their separation allowance. As far as the Skipton Guardians were concerned he felt sure they would be very reluctant to bring him out of the Army, as in twelve months he had obtained two stripes. He also felt the Bench would be ready to do anything to clear him of his past records. There was, however, no reason why the Guardians should relieve a soldier’s wife, which was one of those things which the Army and country did not wish.

Dixon Slater, relieving officer, gave evidence on behalf of the Skipton Guardians and stated that prisoner’s children were admitted to the Workhouse on February 24th, 1917, on account of the home being dirty and also because of the lack of sleeping accommodation. The children were also removed in order that the mother could go out to work to enable her to provide more bed clothing and a proper bed. This family, he added, had been chargeable to the Skipton Union on and off ever since 1908.

Prisoner admitted that what had been said was true and said he had been in hospital nine months; and Mr. Knowles added that he understood he had been twice wounded and said he had his sympathy.

Mr. Knowles: What can you do to put things straight?–I can get separation allowance.

But that will disclose the fact that you enlisted in a wrong name?–I think I can get that put right.

In answer to further questions by Mr. Knowles, prisoner stated that he first enlisted on August 14th, 1914, and went out with the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment to Gallipoli. He was wounded shortly after landing at Suvla Bay, and was sent back to hospital. He has also the misfortune to be reduced in rank, and in consequence of this he overstayed his leave and joined another regiment. Three weeks after he joined this regiment he was made lance-corporal and a week later was promoted full corporal. He passed through his bombing course, and going out to France was wounded on the Somme in September. He came back to hospital at Bangor in the South of Ireland, where he had been nine months, and afterwards came through to Silsden.

Mr. Knowles said he was quite willing for prisoner to be discharged if he would undertake to get the separation allowance and promise to put matters straight. Such a course would give him the opportunity of making further progress in the Army. “He has my best wishes,” added Mr. Knowles, “and I feel sure he has also the good wishes of the Bench.” He was also certain the Guardians would not wish to hinder the man’s progress if he redeemed himself.

Prisoner gave the undertaking required and was thereupon discharged.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

03 September 1915

SILSDEN SOLDIER’S EXPERIENCES IN THE DARDANELLES

Mrs. Upton, of 7, St. John’s Street, Silsden, has received a post card from her husband, Corporal Thomas Upton, of the 8th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who enlisted shortly after the outbreak of hostilities, and has been fighting at the Dardanelles, and has been reported wounded. The post card reads:– “I am back in England once more, wounded in the foot, but I shall soon be all right. Our regiment is cut up, and there are very few left. I will send my address later, as I am on the ship yet.”

The following day Mrs. Upton received a letter from her husband, which reads as follows:–

“I am at Netley Hospital, and doing well. I have been hit in the foot, but I am hoping to be at home very shortly. We have had a rough time of it with the Turks, and I think there will be very few of my regiment left by this time, as there were only 108 out of 1008 officers and men that went into action. We made a new landing, as you will have read about, and we thought that it was going to be all plain sailing, but it was not, and the sights that I saw, what with the killed and wounded, I never want to see again, H. Wood was all right when I left. We were four days and four nights at it as hard as we could go, fighting all the time and we were in the open, worse luck, all the time, and once we had to retreat and they let us have it hot I can tell you. They drove us back within 20 yards of the sea. So you can tell it was a near thing with us, and I am lucky to get off with a wound.”

25 May 1917

SKIPTON PETTY SESSIONS

A SILSDEN SOLDIER AND HIS FAMILY

A Silsden soldier named Thomas Upton (alias Thos. Young) was charged at the instance of the Guardians with failing to maintain his wife and children.

Mr. M. R. Knowles (clerk to the Guardians) stated that the, prisoner’s four children became chargeable to the funds of the Union on March 12th last year, and were still chargeable, £30 3s. 5d. already having been spent by the Guardians in the maintenance of the wife and children. Prisoner joined the army in the name of Upton, and about February of last year enlisted in another regiment in, the name of Young. In consequence of having changed him name there had been no separation allowance coming through to the wife and children. In addition to what the Guardians had spent, the Distress Committee at Silsden had also been contributing 5s. per week towards their maintenance, but when they found out that the separation allowance was not coming through on account of having changed his name, they ceased to contribute any more. In fairness to prisoner he wished to say that his view was that his wife was not everything she ought to be she not having kept her home clean, while the children had not been properly attended to. Her excuse had been that she had no money to do it with. Prisoner had made progress in the army since changing his name to Young, and one could not help but feel sorry that he should not continue in that way. Something, however, ought to be done by him, and he ought to do his best to make his position clear with the army in such a way that the children and wife should receive their separation allowance. As far as the Guardians were concerned he was sure they would feel very reluctant in bringing him out of the army, seeing that in twelve months he had got two stripes, while he was also sure that the Bench would do anything to clear him of his past records. There was, however, no reason why the Guardians should relieve a soldier’s wife. It was one of those things which the army and the country did not wish.

Mr. Dixon Slater, Relieving Officer, corroborated and added that the children were admitted to the Workhouse on February 24th last. They were admitted on account of the home being in a dirty condition and no proper sleeping accommodation, and also in order to give the mother an opportunity of going out to work to provide more bed clothing and a proper bed for the children to sleep on. The family had been chargeable to the Union off and on since 1916.

Prisoner admitted that what had been said was true.

Mr. Knowles: I understand he has been wounded twice and has my sympathy.

Prisoner: I have been nine months in hospital.

Mr. Knowles: What can you do to put things straight?

Prisoner : I can arrange to got the separation allowance.

Mr. Knowles: But that will disclose the fact that you enlisted in a wrong name.

Prisoner: I can get that put right, I think.

In answer to Mr. Knowles, prisoner stated that he enlisted on August 14th, 1914, and went out with the Duke of Wellington’s, being wounded shortly after the landing at Suvla Bay. He came back and was in hospital, and later had the misfortune to be reduced in rank. As a consequence of that he joined another regiment, and three weeks after joining he was made lance-corporal, and a week later a full corporal. He passed through his bombing course, went out to France and was wounded in September on the Somme. He was admitted into hospital at Bangor, South of Ireland, and had been there ever since. He came from a convalescent camp to Silsden.

Mr. Knowles said he was willing for the prisoner to be discharged if he would give an undertaking to get the separation allowance and try to make things straight, and at the same time allow him to make further progress in the army. He had his (Mr. Knowles’) best wishes, and he was sure he also had the good wishes of the Bench. He was certain that the Guardians would not wish to hinder the man’s progress if he would redeem himself.

Prisoner gave the undertaking outlined by Mr Knowles and was accordingly discharged.

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