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William FANTOM

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Surname: FANTOM

Forename(s): William

Place of Birth: Holbeck (Leeds), Yorkshire

Service No: 82918

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Royal Garrison Artillery

Battalion / Unit: 151st Heavy Battery

Division: ---

Age: ---

Date of Death: 1919-01-06

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: ---

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: HOME - UNKNOWN

Local War Memorial: HELLIFIELD, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

William Fantom was the son of William and Mary Ellen Fantom, formerly Bedford, née Crosswaite. Both parents were born at Holbeck, Yorkshire. Mary Ellen Crosswaite married George William Bedford in 1884.

1901 Holbeck, Yorkshire Census: 3, Chancery Court - William Fantom, aged 9 years, born Holbeck, son of William Fantom. [Mary Ellen Bedford, aged 38, housekeeper, also living at this address, is the mother of William Fantom's four children named in the census. William and Mary Ellen married on the 11 September 1904.]

1911 Holbeck, Yorkshire Census: 24, Mackenzie Street - William Fantom, aged 18 years, born Holbeck, son of Mary Ellen Fantom, widow.

The British Army Service Record for William Fantom exists but may be incomplete.

The British Army Pension Record for William Fantom exists but may be incomplete.

William Fantom was living in Hellifield when he attested at Keighley, Yorkshire, on 1 December 1915. His next-of-kin was his mother Mary Ellen Fantom, of 34, Town Gate, Holbeck, Leeds. He was mobilised on the 19 May 1916 and discharged with neurasthenia (shell shock) on the 7 March 1918 and received a pension for this. His record states that 'he was blown by a shell explosion'.

Data Source: Local War Memorial

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record: ---

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No photo available for this Soldier
Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Garrison Artillery

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Garrison Artillery

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

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Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: Not commemorated by the CWGC.

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1920

FANTOM William of Dean Head Sanatorium Horsforth Leeds died 6 January 1920 Administration London 6 February to Mary Ellen Fantom widow. Effects £226 3s.

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Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Courtesy of John Pearcy, Hellifield

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Courtesy of John Pearcy, Hellifield

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Courtesy of John Pearcy, Hellifield

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Courtesy of John Pearcy, Hellifield

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Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

13 September 1918

CORRESPONDENCE

EX SERGEANT AND PEACE MEETINGS – To the Editor of the Craven Herald

Dear Sir, – Re Messrs. Gaunt and Greenwood’s ‘peace by negotiation’ meetings. The reception they received is proof positive that the people are not to be diverted from the grim purpose of winning the war, by any insincere approaches upon the subject of Peace. Russia tested these intimations and found them insincere. Is there an Englishman who would arrange the future of mankind with the Germans of Brest? Never mind about Armenian massacres, Serbia massacres, Belgian massacres, U. boat atrocities here, there, and everywhere. Don’t think of those things, but simply of the Peace Treaty of Brest. Would you negotiate the future of men, women and children with the German scoundrels who trapped the deluded and disarmed Russians to their ruin? No, we are Englishmen. Death rather than dishonour. We have all had enough of War, but unfortunately the Prussian militarists have not, for after four years of it the Prussian Chancellor still speaks of Prussia’s “Unbroken joy of Battle”. Since the Prussian militarists are the determining factor, the war weariness of the people in other countries is of no account. Whilst such a phenomenon as Prussian militarism remains, the peoples must fight, however exhausted they are, or they must surrender. We don’t want to have any understandings with Germany. We understand them already. When they wish for peace let them come forward through accredited representatives and lay their terms on the table. We have laid ours and they know what they are. There is only one peace we want, and that is the Peace which leaves all Civilised Nations free and unafraid. Our aims are to abolish Prussian militarism in Germany, or rather compel her people to do so; to make the world safe for democracy. “We must back up our men and do our level best for them.” There is not one among them who is not ready to lay down his life for us at home.

Yours faithfully,
W. Fantom,
Ex-Artillery Sergeant.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

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19 July 1918

SKIPTON PETTY SESSIONS

CHILDREN’S COURT – THEFT OF A BICYCLE

A twelve year-old Skipton boy was charged with stealing a bicycle, valued at £5, the property of Messrs. W.H. Smith and Sons.

Wm. Fantom, manager of the Skipton Station bookstall, said that on Friday, July 5th., the bicycle was placed near the bookstall, and at 7-30 p.m. the same day he found it was missing and gave information to the police. The prisoner was in the habit of coming to the bookstall for newspapers for various persons three times per day.

Wm. Nook, an errand boy in the employ of Messrs. W.H. Smith and Sons, said that on the day in question he was away from work ill. On the Saturday he learned that the bicycle was missing, and on the Sunday, from something said a him, he went to the prisoner’s home and asked for the bicycle. It was in the passage of the house, and he recognised the bicycle as the one he used in connection with his work at the bookstall. He took the bicycle home, and on the Monday he handed it over to the police.

P.C. Jacques spoke to seeing the prisoner, and when charged he replied, “I saw it on the platform near the bookstall so I rode it home and told my mother that Wm. Nook had lent it to me.”

The boy said he had no intention of stealing the bicycle and was going to take it back on the Monday morning.

The Bench dismissed the case, the Chairman remarking than he hoped it would be a lesson to the boy in future. The Bench were also of the opinion that the manager of the bookstall should see to it that the bicycle was locked up instead of being placed in a public passage near the stall.

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