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Charles PEACHEY

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Surname: PEACHEY

Forename(s): Charles

Place of Birth: Bradford, Yorkshire

Service No: 265642

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 31

Date of Death: 1917-12-11

Awards: M.M., M.I.D.

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: VIII. E. 11.

CWGC Cemetery: DOCHY FARM NEW BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: GIGGLESWICK, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SETTLE, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Charles Peachey was the son of Charles Frederick and Jane Peachey, née Stott. Charles, senior, was born at West Row, Mildenhall, Suffolk and Jane at Upholland, Lancashire.

1891 Bradford, Yorkshire Census: 2, Archer Street, Laisterdyke - Charles Peachy, aged 4 years, born Thornbury [Bradford], son of Charles F. and Jane Peachy.

1901 Bradford, Yorkshire Census: 2, Archer Street, Laisterdyke - Charley Peachey, aged 14 years, born Bradford, son of Charles Peachey, widower.

1911 Bradford, Yorkshire Census: 39, Acton Street, Bradford Moor - Charles Peachey, aged 24 years, born Bradford. [Charles was living with his sister Edith and brother-in-law Thomas G. Wilber.]

Charles was married to Ellen Woolerton in 1916.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Charles Peachey, 2608 & Sgt 265642, West Riding Regiment. Theatre of War first served in: (1) France. Date of entry therein: 14 April 1915.

See also: ‘Guiseley Terriers: A Small Part in The Great War - A History of the 1/6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment’ by Stephen Barber (2018).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

PEACHY, Sergeant Charles, West Riding Regiment, 1, Whelpstone Grove, killed in action Dec. 12, 1917.

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Sergeant Charles PEACHEY

Sergeant Charles PEACHEY

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: PEACHEY

Forename(s): Charles

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted: Settle, Yorks

Number: 265642

Rank: Sergt

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 1/6th Battalion

Decorations: M.M

Died Date: 11/12/17

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: PEACHY

Forename(s): C

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 265642

Rank: Serjeant

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 1st/6th Bn.

Age:

Awards: M M

Died Date: 11/12/1917

Additional Information:

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Additional Photo(s) For Soldier Records

The 'Lucky 13' taken at Riby Park, Lincolnshire, October 1914

The 'Lucky 13' taken at Riby Park, Lincolnshire, October 1914

The group, that called themselves the 'Lucky 13', were serving with the 1/6th Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) Back left to right - Walter Yates. Fred Close, Robert Clark, John M. Morphet (killed), Arthur Parker, Thomas Brayshaw, William H. Brassington (killed), William Hirst Front row, left to right - Charlie Parker, John R. Jackman (killed), John Cardus, Charles Peachey (killed), John S. Hepworth (killed)

Courtesy of The Brayshaw Library, Giggleswick School

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16 November 1917

SETTLE – MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERGEANT CHARLES PEACHEY

Settle people will be pleased to learn that another local Territorial, Sergt. Charles Peachey, Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct on the field. No details are yet available, but in a letter to his wife, who lives with her mother, Mrs. Woolerton, Mrs. Peachey states that his Captain has told him that he has been awarded the medal. Thirty years of age, Sergt. Peachey was mobilised with the Territorials on the outbreak of war and has been in France two years and seven months. So far he has been fortunate enough to escape without a scratch. In civil life he was employed as a dresser by Mr. Holdsworth at the King’s Mill, and played cricket with the Settle second eleven. He was a member of the Settle Choral Society. This is the third time he has been ‘recommended.’ Another brother, Driver Fred Peachey, is serving with the R.F.A. in France, while the sergeant has also three brothers-in-law taking part in the Great War – Pte. Harry Woolerton, with the West Yorkshires in France, Gunner Frank Woolerton with the R.G.A. in France, and Gunner Fred Woolerton with the R.G.A. in Salonika.

21 December 1917

SETTLE – MILITARY MEDALLIST KILLED: SERGEANT CHARLES PEACHY

We regret to learn that Sergeant Charles Peachy, of the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, husband of Mrs. Peachy of 1, Whelpstone Grove, Settle, was killed in action on December 12th. Pte. J. Humphreys, a Settle young man, and a pal of the deceased soldier, in a letter to Mrs. Peachy, states:– “It is with great regret that I write these few lines to let you know that your dear husband, Charlie, was killed this morning at 9-30. I will tell you he had no pain, and only lived about two minutes after he got hit, and we buried him this morning just behind the lines, and we are all upset about it. I therefore cannot let you know so much, but I will write to you again as soon as I get out of this awful place. I expect the company officer will be writing to you as soon as he can. We lost two more boys at the same time as your husband was killed. He was very much liked by all the boys, and I know he was the best sergeant we had in the company. The company officer will tell you more than I can about his work. All the boys offer you their deepest sympathy.”

Capt. K. Ogston also writes:– “It is with the deepest regret that I have to inform you of your husband’s death this morning. He was killed by a shell, and it might be some consolation to you to know that he suffered no pain. He was one of the best soldiers we ever had, and was always willing and ready to do anything he was called upon to do. I know how hard it is for you, but be worthy of him, be worthy of a man who answered his country’s call, and who did his duty as a man. All the officers, N.C.O.s and men of the company will miss him, and they all join me in deepest sympathy in your very sad loss.”

Sgt. Peachy, who was 31 years of age, mobilised with the local Territorials in 1914, and went out to France in April 1915. He was only home on leave a few weeks ago, and had only been back in the trenches about a week when he met his death. Not long ago Sergt. Peachy was awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct in the field.

In civil life he was employed as a dresser by Mr. Holdsworth, at King’s Mill, and played cricket with the Settle second eleven. He was a member of the Settle Choral Society. Another brother, Driver Fred Peachy, is serving with the R.F.A. in France, while there are also three brothers-in-law taking part in the Great War – Pte. Harry Woollerton with the West Yorkshires, who was wounded on December 12th, and has been admitted to hospital in France; Gunner Frank Woollerton, with the R.G.A. in France; and Gunner Fred Woollerton, with the R.G.A. in Salonika.

20 December 1918

PEACHEY – In loving memory of my dear husband, Sergeant C. Peachey, who was killed in action December 12th, 1917.

“Peace, perfect peace.”

From his loving wife, 1 Whelpstone Grove, Settle.

12 December 1919

PEACHEY – In loving memory of Sergeant Charles Peachey, who was killed in action December 12th, 1917.

“Too dearly loved to be forgotten.”

From his loving Wife, 1 Whelpstone Grove, Settle.

16 December 1921

PEACHEY – In loving memory of Charles Peachey, killed in action, December 12th, 1917.

“Memories.”

From his loving Wife, Whelpstone Grove, Settle.

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25 June 1915

CRICKET AT THE FRONT

The following is a report sent by a Lance-Corporal in the Settle Territorials, who is at the Front:–
A cricket match of considerable interest was played between teams of ‘A’ and ‘C’ Companies of the 6th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment on Thursday evening, 17th instant. The ground situate between two burnt down farm houses, not far behind the firing line, was in a rough condition, dotted here and there with shell holes, and during the progress of the game, shells were bursting not far away on both right and left. The game was keenly followed by men of the companies concerned, with aeroplanes hovering over and around an old game in a new setting. The lads from Settle and Guiseley proved far too strong for the Skiptonians, as will be seen from the scores etc., below, Morphet and Claughton both bowled in fine style, and the men of ‘A’ Company put a very feeble show.

‘C’ Company

Lance-Corpl. J.M. Morphet b Burgess – 12
Pte. H. Claughton c E. Smith b Drummond – 2
Pte. H.M. Claughton c Petty b J. Smith – 20
Pte. Patterson b Lambert – 22
Pte. Chas. Parker c Lieut. Supple b Lambert – 7
Lieut. Whitaker lbw b Lambert – 3
Lieut. Geldard b Lambert – 3
Pte. F. Close lbw b Lieut. Supple – 0
Pte. J. Cardus not out – 11
Lance-Corpl. Denison b Lambert – 1
Pte. C. Peachy b Lambert – 0
Lance-Corpl. Arthur Parker b Lambert – 0
Extras – 16

Total – 97

‘A’ Company

Pte. Burgess c Peachy b Morphet – 4
Pte. Rimmer c Lieut. Whitaker b H.M. Claughton – 0
Pte. Drummond c Denison b Morphet – 0
Lance- Corpl. Ireland c Patterson b Morphet – 1
Pte. Petty c and b H.M. Claughton – 8
Pte. Kaye b H.M. Claughton – 0
Pte. J. Smith b H.M. Claughton – 5
Pte. Walton c A. Parker (wicket keeper) b Morphet – 0
Lieut. E.J.C. Supple c Lieut. Geldard b Claughton – 0
Pte. N. Smith b Morphet – 3
Pte. E. Smith b Morphet – 0
Lance-Corpl. Lambert not out – 0
Extras – 1
Total – 22

A HUMOROUS ANNOUNCEMENT

In connection with the above event Mr. T. Brayshaw, J.P., drew up and caused to be posted in Settle the following announcement:

GREAT CRICKET MATCH!
SPECIAL ATTRACTION!!

On Friday, June 18th (Military Duties, Germans, and weather permitting), it is intended to have a grand Cricket Match,

SETTLE v SKIPTON,

in a field at Fleurbaix (N.W. France), the teams being selected from the men of the above two towns now on active service with the 1st 6th Batt. Duke of Wellington’s Regiment.

In order to promote the comfort of the spectators the locality will be carefully cleared of all German snipers beforehand, and visitors will be allowed to carry away fragments of any German shells that may fall on the Cricket Field during the progress of the game.

N.B. – There are still one or two vacancies ‘at the front,’ in case any unmarried young men from Settle wish to join the above teams.

GOTT–STRAFE–SKIPTON

16 November 1917

MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERGT. CHAS. PEACHEY

Settle people will be pleased to learn that another local territorial, Sergt. Charles Peachey, Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct on the field. No details are yet available, but in a letter to his wife, who lives with her mother, Mrs. Woolerton, Sergt. Peachey states that his Captain has told him that he has been awarded the medal. Thirty years of age, Sergt. Peachey was mobilised with the Territorials on the outbreak of war and has been in France two years and seven months. So far he has been fortunate enough to escape without a scratch. In civil life he was employed as a dresser by Mr. Holdsworth at King’s Mill, and played cricket with the Settle second eleven. He was a member of the Settle Choral Society. This is the third time he has been ‘recommended.’ Another brother, Driver Fred Peachey, is serving with the R.F.A., in France, while the sergeant has also three brothers-in-law taking part in the great war. – Pte. Harry Woolerton with the West Yorkshires in France, Gunner Frank Woolerton with the R.G.A., in France, and Gunner Fred Woolerton with the R.G.A. in Salonika.

21 December 1917

PEACHY – Killed in action Dec. 12th. Sergt. Charles Peachy, of the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, husband of Mrs. Peachy, of 1, Whelpstone Grove, Settle, aged 31.

21 December 1917

SETTLE MILITARY MEDALLIST KILLED

We regret to learn that Sergt. Charles Peachy, of the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, husband of Mrs. Peachy, of 1, Whelpstone Grove, Settle, was killed in action on December 12th. Pte. J. Humphreys, a Settle young man, and a pal of the deceased soldier, in a letter to Mrs. Peachy, states:–”It is with great regret that I write these few lines to let you know that your dear husband, Charlie, got killed this morning at 9-30. I will tell you he had no pain, and only lived about two minutes after he got hit, and we buried him this morning just behind the lines. I am writing this in the lines, and we are all upset about it. I therefore cannot let you know so much but I will write to you again as soon as I get out of this awful place. I expect the company officer will be writing to you as soon as he can. We lost two more boys at the same time as your husband got killed. He was very much liked by all the boys, and I do know he was the best sergeant we had in the company. The company Officer will tell you more than I can about his work. All the boys offer you their deepest sympathy.”

Capt. K. Ogston also writes:– “It is with the deepest regret that I have to inform you of your husband’s death this morning. He was killed by a shell, and it might be some consolation to you to know that he suffered no pain. He was one of the best soldiers we ever had and always willing and ready to do anything he was called upon to do. I know how hard it is for you, but be worthy of him, be worthy of a man who answered his country’s call, and who did his duty as man. All the officers, N.C.O.’s, and men of the company will miss him, and they all join me in deepest sympathy in your very sad loss.”

Sergt. Peachey, who was 31 years of age, mobilised with the local Territorials in 1914, and went out to France in April, 1915. He was only home on leave a few weeks ago, and had only been back in the trenches about a week when he met his death. Not long ago Sergt. Peachy was awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct in the field.

In civil life was employed as a dresser by Mr. Holdsworth at King’s Mill, and played cricket with the Settle second eleven. He was a Member of the Settle Choral Society. Another brother, Driver Fred Peachey, is serving with the R.F.A. in France, while deceased has also three brothers-in-law taking part in the great war. – Pte. Harry Woolerton with the West Yorkshires who was wounded on December 12th, and has been admitted to hospital in France, Gunner Frank Woolerton with the R.G.A. in France, and Gunner Fred Woolerton with the R.G.A. in Salonika.

04 January 1918

SETTLE’S FALLEN HEROES

Memorial Service at the Parish Church

A memorial service for the Settle soldiers who have fallen in the war was held at the Parish Church last Sunday afternoon. There was a large congregation, and the service was conducted by Rev. W. E. Linney (vicar). The hymns ‘God of the living in Whose eyes,’ ‘Jesus lives,’ ‘On the resurrection morn,’ and ‘ O God our help in aged past’ were sung, and the ‘Last Post’ was sounded at the close of the service by two of the local Cadets. The organist (Mr. F. Lord) also played appropriate music as the congregation assembled and left the church.

The Vicar, in the course of his sermon, said they were met to remember the Settle soldiers, men, and boys – some indeed little more than boys – who had laid down their lives for the country at the war, whether during the year which was just drawing to a close or in the earlier stages of the conflict. When he asked them to remember those heroes that day, he knew that he was asking them to do what they were always doing. They were their own dear ones united to many of them by ties of blood – husbands, fathers, brothers, sons, as well as friends. How could they forget them? Were they not reminded of them day by day by the gaps in their home circles, which could never again be filled by them? They all desired in their hearts that God would bless and keep them, and give them peace. and happiness. The Vicar then read the following list of the Settle men who had laid down their lives:– John Edward Bell, Geo. S. Belles, Fredk. Baldwin, John Barrett, Robert Bateson, William Bradley, Frank Bulcock, George R. Bullock, Herbert Clark, John Cokell, Edward Ellershaw, Jas. Ewart, Wm. Ewart, Fredk. Frost, Harold Goss, Alfred Gower, Joseph Lord, John Morphet, John Packard, Chas. Peachey, Thomas Howarth Preston, Albert Ralph, Thos. Stackhouse, George Edward Turner, Derwent Turnbull, Wm. Troughton, Harry Walton, John Edward Wilson, Ernest Wooff, and Robert Wooff. Proceeding, the Vicar said they had a responsibility with regard to those men. They owed them a debt, and he trusted and believed that they were wishful to do all that they could to repay it. “ Our lives are being saved by their death. If we have any future before us on the earth it is because they gave up their futures to secure it. Their right to survive was as good as our own. Many of them would have been of far more use in the world than we can hope to be. The future stands to be only poorer for our surviving in their stead. We are debtors to them for all they have given us. To the future think of all it has lost in them.” How were they going to pay the debt, and in paying it to honour their heroic dead? Surely there could be but one answer – to live to give effect to their ideals. When they were asked what those ideals were, they might be well put in the words of Bishop Walshaw How’s hymn written for the diamond jubilee of Queen Victoria, “To make the world a better world for man’s brief earthly dwelling.” If Prussian militarism should gain the ascendancy the world would be scarcely a fit place to live in. What they wanted was the triumph of right and liberty. That was the task they had begun, and many of them, fired by the enthusiasm of a noble cause, literally went singing to their death. The old life which had no loftier aim than a high standard of material comfort had been felt to be unsatisfactory. To ardent youth the higher spirit of self-sacrifice, which was the spirit of Christ, beckoned onward with irresistible attractiveness, and they followed the gleam. They had yet to complete the great task to which they dedicated themselves. That was the way they could honour the memory of their fallen heroes, and with confidence that they had not died in vain.

A collection taken on behalf of the Red Cross Society realised £5 15s.

13 December 1918

In loving memory of my dear husband, Sergt. C. Peachey, who was killed in action Dec. 12th, 1917.

Peace, perfect peace.

– From his loving wife. 1, Whelpstone Grove, Settle.

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