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Fanny MASON

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Surname: MASON

Forename(s): Fanny

Place of Birth: Hawes, Yorkshire

Service No: ---

Rank: Staff Nurse

Regiment / Corps / Service: Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (Reserve)

Battalion / Unit: Special Reserve

Division: ---

Age: 27

Date of Death: 1917-04-10

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: 'Salta' Memorial.

CWGC Cemetery: STE. MARIE CEMETERY, LE HAVRE

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: GIGGLESWICK, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: HAWES, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SETTLE, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Fanny Mason (born 7 June 1889) was the daughter of Thomas and Catherine Elizabeth Mason, née Capstick. Thomas was born at Cautley and Catherine at Dent, Yorkshire,

1891 Hawes, Yorkshire Census: Dyers Garth - Fanny Mason, aged 1 year, born Hawes, daughter of Thomas and Catherine Mason.

1901 Giggleswick, Yorkshire Census: Tems Street - Fanny Mason, aged 11 years, born Hawes, Yorkshire, daughter of Thomas and Catherine E. Mason.

1911 Crosshills, Yorkshire Census: 52, Rylands Street - Fanny Mason, aged 21 years, born Hawes, Yorkshire. [Fanny was employed by Esther Elizabeth Hartley, widow.]

Fanny lost her life when H.M.H.S. 'Salta' was mined and sank half-a-mile north from Whistle Buoy, Le Havre, 10 April 1917.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Staff Nurse Fanny Mason, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service (Reserve).

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: S. Nurse F. Mason, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R. Died 10.4.17.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: Staff Nurse F. Mason, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R. Date and Place of Death: Drowned 10.4.17. To whom issued: Father - Thomas Mason Esq. Amount: £12 1s. 2d.

The Nursing Service Record for Fanny Mason is held at The National Archives: (WO 399/5694).

The Five Sisters' Window in York Minster is dedicated as a war memorial to the women of the British Empire who lost their lives, 1914-1918. Fanny is commemorated by name and service in St Nicholas' Chapel in the North Transept of the Minster.

A short biography of Fanny is included in: ‘Sedbergh and District 1914-1918 - But who shall return the children?’ Compiled by Sedbergh and District History Society. Edited by Diane Elphick (2016).

Data Source: Local War Memorial

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

MASON, Nurse Fanny, aged 28, Ivyfold, Giggleswick, drowned ex. H.M.H.S. 'Salter,' April 10, 1917.

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Staff Nurse Fanny MASON

Staff Nurse Fanny MASON

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (Reserve)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Queen Alexandra’s Imperial Military Nursing Service (Reserve)

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: MASON

Forename(s): Fanny

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: Staff Nurse

Regiment: Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service

Battalion:

Decorations:

Died Date: 10/04/17

Died How: Drowned

Theatre of War:

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: MASON

Forename(s): Fanny

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Staff Nurse

Regiment: Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service

Unit: Special Reserve

Age: 27

Awards:

Died Date: 10/04/1917

Additional Information: Daughter of Thomas and Catherine Elizabeth Mason, of Ivy Court, Giggleswick, nr. Settle, Yorks. Native of Hawes, Yorks.

View Additional Text

View Additional Text For Soldier Records

The last will and testament of Staff Nurse Fanny Mason

(Courtesy of The National Archives - Catalogue Reference: WO/399/5694)

In the train.

Good Friday.

My Dearest Mother,

We are enroute for Southampton I must now make my will (last will and testament).

My costume and blouse for Mary. You must have the furs. I have nothing to leave really, you will find a lot of rubbish in my trunk, save my summer combinations and any decent underclothing for me. I have about 8£ with me I have left 5£ with Mr. Keogh to put in War Savings for me. I got about 25£ and have spent half in kit. Had a fearful rush to get ready. I guess I shall be fearfully sick I shall want the white straw hat and black velour only.

No doubt we shall be all right. What has to be will be and we are quite as safe on sea, as in a bombarded town. We had a taxi from Woolwich to Waterloo cost a dickens of a lot of money 10/- each. Four of us are going. I think we shall have an easy time going out but will return busy. I rather hope we shall go to Alexandria and if possible I will go along to Cairo to see Tom it will be jolly.

Ugh!! It is cold and snowing fast. My trunk may not reach you for sometime Sister a pal of mine is going to send it off. You had better get a new key because the coat and skirt will be crushed I just packed them anyhow. My old blue cape is for Sally.

Love to father and your self Madge and Lizzie.

Yours Fanny

Oh it’s an awful long way to S. Hampton but we are 1st class.

Love Fanny.

Transcription of a letter from the mother of Fanny Mason

(Posted on rootsweb.com by archiver > YORKSGEN > 2010-08 > 1281294855.) (CPGW apologises for not crediting the transcription as the original source was unknown)

Ivy Court
Giggleswick
10th May 1917

Dear Mrs. Buxton

I must thank you all for your kind letter in our sorrow. It has been a
terrible sorrow. God only knows how I have suffered these last three weeks.
I often wonder what such like things could happen. But I think our dear
Fanny has missed some great trouble or suffering, we cannot tell. But it is
Gods will and he knows best.

Fanny only went on Good Friday. I had a letter from her the very day that it
happened. So I can tell you when we heard we got a shock. We could hardly
think it was true. That we shall never see her again if only we could have
buried her, but we could not do anything, but mourn for her.

I cannot write much, I am sending you photos we shall be pleased to see any
of you. Could you come it is such a long time since we have seen you.

I must close thanking you again for the sweet verses and kind words with
kindest regards to all from your own friend.

Ch Mason

THE LOSS OF H.M.H.S. "SALTA"

(Courtesy of Owen Keen - www.unioncastlestaffregister.co.uk)

The "Salta" sailed from Southampton on the 9th of April 1917 for Le Havre under the command of Captain Eastaway. Her owners were French, the Societe Generale de Transport Maritmes and she had been chartered by the British government for use as a 461 bed hospital ship. She arrived off Le Havre roads in bad weather on the 10th of April. The drifter H.M.S. “Diamond" on inspection ship duty confirmed her identification and H.M.H.S. "Salta" proceeded without a pilot along the buoyed channel to the harbour entrance.

Salta was chartered by the Admiralty in February 1915 from the French Talabot Company and converted to a hospital ship. In accordance with the Hague Convention of 1894, the steamer was painted white with a broad horizontal green band with red crosses, theoretically protecting it from attack.

On the night of the 9th to 10th April 1917, Salta, accompanied by Lanfranc, Western Australia and an escort of destroyers, steamed from Southampton to the naval base of Le Havre. During the morning of the 10th April a French patrol craft had found mines drifting in the Le Havre approaches and all vessels entering the port were to be warned. The mines had been laid the previous day by the German mine-laying submarine UC 26.

At 11.20am, Salta approached the port entrance and stopped engines. A patrol craft instructed the Salta convoy to follow it towards the English drifter Diamond which checked the identity of each ship before opening the barrage allowing entry into the port. Satisfied, the drifter gives its green light and Salta was authorised to continue.

Whilst following the buoyed channel into Le Havre, Salta's Captain Eastaway gave orders to alter course to the north. The commander of the Diamond relayed a frantic message that Salta was now approaching the zone where mines had been seen that morning. One of the Salta's surviving officers reported that Eastaway was concerned about entering Le Havre without a pilot because of the bad weather and had wanted to let the other ships pass.

Realising that they were in grave danger, Eastaway tried to re-trace his course back to the buoyed channel. In poor weather conditions, Salta drifted across the mined zone and hit a mine at 11.43am. An enormous explosion breached the hull near the engine room and hold number three. Water engulfed the disabled ship, which listed to starboard and sank in less than 10 minutes, ½ mile north of Whistle Buoy.

Despite help arriving rapidly, the state of the sea and the strong winds hampered the rescue operation and the human cost was appalling. Of 205 passengers and crew, 9 nurses, 42 wounded and 79 crew perished. In spite of extensive searches, only 13 bodies were initially recovered. There are now 24 burials from the sinking of the Salta in Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre, and also a memorial to those who were not recovered.

The sinking of the Salta had another victim. The English patrol craft P-26 was involved in the rescue operations and hit another mine, the ship was split in two and sank.

View Additional Image(s)

Additional Photo(s) For Soldier Records

Staff Nurse Fanny Mason

Staff Nurse Fanny Mason

Courtesy of Mr Tom Greenway, Cowling

Staff Nurse Fanny Mason's British War Medal and Victory Medal

Staff Nurse Fanny Mason's British War Medal and Victory Medal

Courtesy of Mr Tom Greenway, Cowling

Next of kin Memorial Plaque

Next of kin Memorial Plaque

Courtesy of Mr Tom Greenway, Cowling

North Transept, York Minster

North Transept, York Minster

Memorial for the Women of Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service

'Salta' Memorial, Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre

'Salta' Memorial, Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre

Courtesy of Judi Le Gresley

'Salta' Memorial, Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre - detail

'Salta' Memorial, Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre - detail

Courtesy of Judi Le Gresley

'Salta' Memorial, Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre - detail

'Salta' Memorial, Ste. Marie Cemetery, Le Havre - detail

Courtesy of Judi Le Gresley

H.M.H.S. ‘Salta’

H.M.H.S. ‘Salta’

Source: Unknown

The Capstick family

The Capstick family

Photograph of the Capstick family taken at Underwinder, Sedbergh: standing (order not known) - Thomas Capstick, Miles Leighton Capstick and John James Capstick; sitting L-R - Polly Capstick, John Capstick, Martha Capstick, Catherine Elizabeth Mason (née Capsick) mother of Fanny Mason.

Courtesy of Mr Tom Greenway, Cowling

The Nursing Memorial, National Memorials Arboretum, Alrewas, Staffordshire

The Nursing Memorial, National Memorials Arboretum, Alrewas, Staffordshire

Commemorating the Voluntary Aid Detachment and professional nurses who lost their lives in the 1st and 2nd World Wars

© Nursing Memorial Appeal (WMR-76515)

View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

27 April 1917

MASON – April 10th 1917, drowned through the sinking of Hospital ship, ‘Salta’, Nurse Fanny Mason, aged 28 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mason, of Ivyfold, Giggleswick.

27 April 1917

GIGGLESWICK – DROWNING OF NURSE MASON

The drowning of Nurse Fanny Mason by the sinking of the hospital ship ‘Salta’ on the 10th instant caused quite a feeling of gloom in the village, and of abhorrence for the Huns, and much sympathy is extended to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mason, of Ivyfold, Giggleswick. Deceased was 28 years of age, and had been in training as a nurse for the past four years, being successful in all her examinations, and a splendid career was in front of her. She commenced her training at Bagthorpe Infirmary, Nottingham, and afterwards removed to St. Herbert’s Military Hospital, Woolwich. She had endeared herself to all her patients by her sympathy and feeling for them in their troubles, and beautiful letters have been received from both the Matrons of the above hospitals, each stating her great qualities as a nurse. For many years she resided at Sedbergh, where she was well known, being the grand-daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Mason, of Hebblethwaite Hall, and of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Capstick, of Underwinder. Nurse Mason is the first nurse from the Settle District who has made the supreme sacrifice.

04 May 1917

GIGGLESWICK – NURSE FANNY MASON

We give a photograph of Nurse Fanny Mason, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Mason, Ivy Fold, Giggleswick, who went down in the hospital ship ‘Salta’ on April 10th last. The ship, as stated in last week’s ‘Craven Herald’, was sunk by a German submarine, and the fiendish act has created an intense feeling of horror among the people of this neighbourhood, where Nurse Mason is well known and deservedly respected. Nurse Mason was 28 years of age, and had been four years engaged in her noble profession.

01 February 1918

GIGGLESWICK – The late Nurse Mason

On Friday at the Royal Herbert Military Hospital Chapel a memorial tablet was unveiled by the Chaplain General, Bishop Taylor Smith, in memory of Staff Nurse Fanny Mason and Staff Nurse A. G. Mann, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R. who lost their lives on H.M. Hospital Ship ‘Salta’ on April 10th, 1917. Nurse Mason was the third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Mason, Ivy Fold, Giggleswick.

05 April 1918

MASON – In sweetest remembrance of Staff Nurse F. Mason. Q.A.I.M.N.S.R., lost at sea April 10th. 1917.

Sad was the day when the news came to me
Of my dear sister lost at sea;
In the pride of her youth she answered the call,
And died a heroine like them all.
She was going to help her comrades
In that land so far from home,
Her life was short, she did her best,
May God grant her eternal rest.

From Mary and Frank, Giggleswick.

MASON – In sad but loving remembrance of Staff Nurse Fanny Mason, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R., who was lost at sea on Easter Tuesday, April 10th, 1917.

“When thou passest through the waters
I will be with thee.”

From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers, Ivy Fold, Giggleswick.

11 April 1919

MASON – In ever loving memory of Nurse Fanny Mason, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R., who lost her life on H.M.S. Salta on April 10th, 1917.

Worthy of everlasting love
From those she left behind;
May perpetual light shine o’er her.

Ever remembered by Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters, Ivy Fold, Giggleswick.

09 April 1920

MASON – In dearest remembrance of Fanny Mason who was lost at sea on H.M.S. Salta on Easter Tuesday, April 10th, 1917.

It was God who gave and called away
The one we loved so dear;
She gave her life for the cause of right,
And her country she loved so dear.

Ever remembered by her Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers, Ivy Fold, Giggleswick.

08 April 1921

MASON – In loving memory of Nurse Fanny Mason, who died at sea on H.M.H.S. Salta, on April 10th, 1917.

“Worthy of everlasting love.”

Ever remembered by All at Ivy Fold, Giggleswick.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

24 April 1917

MASON – Drowned on hospital ship ‘Salta,' April 10th, Nurse Fanny Mason, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mason, of Ivyfold, Giggleswick, aged 28.

24 April 1917

CRAVEN’S LOSSES IN THE WAR – DROWNING OF NURSE MASON

The drowning of Nurse Fanny Mason by the sinking of the hospital ship ‘Salta,’ on the 10th instant caused quite a feeling of gloom to spread over the village, and of abhorrence for the Huns, and much sympathy is extended to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mason, of Ivyfold, Giggleswick. The deceased was 28 years of age, and had been in training as a nurse for the past four years, being successful in all her examinations, and a splendid career was in front of her. She commenced her training at Bagthorpe Infirmary, Nottingham, afterwards removed to St. Herbert’s Military Hospital, Woolwich. She had endeared herself to all her patients with her sympathy and feeling for them in their troubles, and beautiful letters have been received from both the matrons of the above hospitals, each stating her great qualities as a nurse. For many years she resided at Sedbergh, where she was well known, being the grand-daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Mason, of Hebblethwaite Hall, and of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Capstick, of Underwinder. Nurse Mason is the first nurse from the Settle district who has made the supreme sacrifice.

01 February 1918

GIGGLESWICK

THE LATE NURSE MASON – On Friday of last week at the Royal Herbert Military Hospital Chapel a memorial tablet was unveiled by the chaplain (General Bishop Taylor Smith) in memory of Staff-nurse Fanny Mason, and Staff-nurse A. G. Mann, Q.A.I.M.N.S.R., who lost their lives on H.M. Hospital Ship ‘Salta,’ on April 10th, 1917. Nurse Mason was the third daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thos Mason, Ivy Fold, Giggleswick.

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