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Harry Thornton PICKLES

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Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): Harry Thornton

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: ---

Rank: T/2nd Lieutenant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 9th (Service) Battalion

Division: 17th (Northern) Division

Age: 26

Date of Death: 1916-04-26

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: IX. G. 28.

CWGC Cemetery: CITE BONJEAN MILITARY CEMETERY, ARMENTIERES

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: BARNOLDSWICK, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Harry Thornton Pickles (born 11 March 1890) was the son of Stephen and Sarah Cowgill Pickles, née Riley. Stephen was born at Barnoldswick and Sarah at Thornton-in-Craven, Yorkshire.

1891 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: 5, East View - Harry T. Pickles, aged 1 year, born Barnoldswick, son of Stephen and Sarah C. Pickles.

1901 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: Colne Road - Harry T. Pickles, aged 11 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Stephen and Sarah C. Pickles.

1911 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: Raygill, Brogden - Harry Thornton Pickles, aged 21 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Stephen and Sarah Cowgill Pickles.

Harry was married to Ada Herf in 1916. Ada was the daughter of Ludwig and Elizabeth Ada Herf.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: 2/Lt Harry Thornton Pickles, West Riding Regiment. Commissioned: 20 March 1915. Theatre of War first served in: France. Correspondence: Mrs H.T. Pickles, Thornleigh, Foots Cray Road, New Eltham.

A short biography of Harry is included in: ‘Barnoldswick - A small Town’s part in conflicts 1800 to 2014’ by Peter Ian Thompson (2014).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

PICKLES, Second Lieutenant Harry Thornton, aged 26 years, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, second son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, J.P., C.C., Raygill, [Barnoldswick], killed in action in France, April 26, 1916.

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T/2nd Lieutenant Harry Thornton PICKLES

T/2nd Lieutenant Harry Thornton PICKLES

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 17th (Northern) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 17th (Northern) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): Harry Thornton

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: 2/Lt (Tp)

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 11th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 26/04/16

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War:

Notes: (Att 9th Bn)

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): Harry Thornton

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Second Lieutenant

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 11th Bn. attd. 9th Bn.

Age: 26

Awards:

Died Date: 26/04/1916

Additional Information: Son of Stephen and Sarah Pickles, of Raygill, Barnoldswick, Yorks. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: HE HAS OUTSOARED THE SHADOW OF OUR NIGHT)

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1916

PICKLES Harry Thornton of Raygill Barnoldswick Yorkshire died 26 April 1916 in France killed in action Probate London 26 June to Fred Pickles cloth agent. Effects £79 15s.

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Additional Photo(s) For Soldier Records

Unknown platoon of 'A' Company, 10th (Service) Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment), Aldershot, 1914

Unknown platoon of 'A' Company, 10th (Service) Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment), Aldershot, 1914

Photograph sent home to his parents at Bolton by Bowland by Pte Henry (Harry) Valance Killeen (13738). Henry is standing, with his hands behind his back, 11th from right. His brother, Pte Reginald Victor Whiteley Killeen (q.v.), was killed in action on the 25 January 1916

Courtesy of Paula Ann Payne (née Bailey), Barnoldswick

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

Entry on Page 30

St Mary's Churchyard, Thornton-in-Craven

St Mary's Churchyard, Thornton-in-Craven

Family gravestone

St Mary's Churchyard, Thornton-in-Craven

St Mary's Churchyard, Thornton-in-Craven

Family gravestone - detail of memorial inscription

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View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

05 May 1916

PICKLES – April 26th, killed in action in France, Second Lieutenant Harry Thornton Pickles, 10th West Ridings, son of Mr. S. Pickles, Raygill House, Barnoldswick, aged 26.

05 May 1916

BARNOLDSWICK OFFICER KILLED IN ACTION

The sad news was received on Sunday morning, in a telegram from the War Office, of the death of Second Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, second son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, J.P., C.C., cotton manufacturer of Raygill, Barnoldswick, who was killed in action on April 26th. He was 26 years of age. A young man of exceptional talents, with every prospect of a brilliant future, he responded to the call of his country by joining the Army in September, 1914, enlisting as a private in the 10th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment. After a period of training at Frensham Camp he was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant and transferred to the 3rd Reserve Battalion at North Shields, where he was given a position of responsibility in training and organising the despatch of troops to the Front. He was drafted out to France in January and after a brief training in grenade throwing was given charge of a Battalion. He was married at Lewisham the week before leaving England. The bride being Miss Ada Heuf, of New Eltham, Kent. On Saturday last his parents received from him a cheerful letter dated April 25th, one day before his death, saying he was quite well and feeling very fit.

Second-Lieut. Pickles was educated at Silcoates School, near Wakefield, where he spent five years, leaving at the age of 17 with all the scholarships the school had to confer. He then went to Victoria University, Manchester, where, during his six years’ stay, due to diligent study he carried all before him, taking his B.A. degree with honours before the age of 20. The M.A. degree was conferred upon him the following year. Six years ago he began to study for the law, and was articled to Messrs. Goulty and Goodfellow, solicitors, Manchester. Early in 1914 he obtained the University degree of LL.B. While at Manchester Mr. Pickles maintained a keen interest in sport, playing with the Varsity Soccer team, of which he was captain in 1911-12. In his final examination as a solicitor he topped the list, being the only competitor who passed with first-class honours, and secured the “Stephen Heelis prize for Manchester and Salford Students” in the form of a large gold medal awarded by the Manchester Law Society.

An estimate of his intellectual attainments may be formed from the fact that shortly after leaving the University the authorities selected him from amongst a large number of applicants for a vacant lectureship in English Law and Jurisprudence, which he was to have commenced with the winter term of 1914, but which he was destined never to occupy owing to the outbreak of war and the more insistent call of patriotism.

A letter received on Wednesday morning from Pte. James Mudd, another Barnoldswick man in the same Battalion, states that Lieut. Pickles was killed by concussion from a bursting shell whilst going through the trenches to see that his men were all right. A bombardment from the enemy’s heavy guns, lasting nearly three hours, was in progress at the time. Pte. Mudd adds that Lieut. Pickles was not struck by the projectile nor disfigured in any way, and that had he stuck to his dugout he would doubtless have come through scathless.

12 May 1916

SKIPTON PETTY SESSIONS – THE LATE LIEUTENANT PICKLES

Prior to the commencement of business, the Chairman said once again he had to stand there to offer the condolence of the Bench to one of its members on the death of a gallant son – Mr. Stephen Pickles having lost his son in action. He was a young man of very great promise who had already had a brilliant career at the University, and whose life appeared to offer very great prospects of success. The Bench sincerely sympathised with the parents in the loss they had sustained.

04 July 1919

PEACE SUPPLEMENT TO THE 'CRAVEN HERALD' – CRAVEN'S FALLEN OFFICERS: SECOND-LIEUTENANT H. T. PICKLES

3rd Reserve Battalion Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, J.P., C.C., Raysgill, Barnoldswick. Killed in action April 26th, 1916, aged 26 years.

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19 March 1915

BARNOLDSWICK NEWS

Friends of Mr. Harry Thornton Pickles, M.A., L.L.B., son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, C.C., and formerly lecturer in English law and jurisprudence at Manchester University, who joined Kitchener’s Army as a private soon after the outbreak of war, will be pleased to learn that on March 18th he was gazetted a Second Lieutenant and was posted to the ‘D’ Company, 10th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment. Up to that date he remained in the same regiment as a private. He is now reported to Bedford for two or three week’s training.

05 May 1916

BARNOLDSWICK OFFICER KILLED IN ACTION

The sad news was received on Sunday morning in a telegram from the War Office of the death of Second-Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, second son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, J.P., C.C., cotton manufacturer of Raygill, Barnoldswick. The telegram stated that he was killed in action on April 26. He was 26 years of age. A young man of exceptional talents, with every prospect of a brilliant future, he responded to the call of his country by joining the army in September 1914, enlisting as a Private in the 10th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment. After a period of training at Frensham Camp he was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant, and transferred to the 3rd Reserve Battalion at North Shields, where he was given a position of responsibility in training and organising the despatch of troops to the front. He was drafted out to France in January last, and after a brief training in grenade throwing was given charge of a Battalion. He was married on January 20th, at Lewisham, to Miss Ada Heuf, of New Eltham, Kent. On Saturday last his parents received from him a cheerful letter (dated April 25th, the day before his death), saying he was quite well and feeling very fit.

Second-Lieut. Pickles was educated at Silcoates School, near Wakefield, where he spent five years, leaving at the age of 17 with all the scholarships the school had to confer. He then went to Victoria University, Manchester, where he carried all before him, taking his B.A. degree with honours before the age of 20. The M.A. degree was conferred upon him the following year. Six years ago he began to study for the law, and was articled to Messrs. Goulty and Goodfellow, solicitors, Manchester. Early in 1914 he secured the University degree of LL.B., with first-class honours. While at Manchester Mr. Pickles maintained a keen interest in sport, playing with the Varsity Association team, of which he was captain in 1911-12. In his final examination as solicitor he outdistanced all competitors being the only one in the list who passed with ‘first-class’ honours, and secured the Stephen Heelis Prize for Manchester and Salford Students in the form of a massive gold medal, awarded by the Manchester Law Society.

An estimate of the value set upon his intellectual attainments may be formed from the fact that shortly after leaving the University the authorities selected him from amongst a large number of applicants for a vacant lectureship in English Law and Jurisprudence, on which he was to have commenced with the winter term of 1914, but which he was destined never to occupy owing to the outbreak of war and the more insistent call of patriotism.

A letter received on Wednesday morning from Private James Mudd, another Barnoldswick man in the same battalion, states that Lieut. Pickles was killed by concussion from a bursting shell whilst going through the trenches to see that his men were all right. A bombardment from the enemy’s heavy guns, lasting nearly 3 hours, was in progress at the time. Private Mudd adds that Lieut. Pickles was not struck by the projectile nor disfigured in any way, and that had he stuck to his dugout he would doubtless have come through scathless.

12 May 1916

AN EARBY SOLDIER KILLED

A letter received from an Earby comrade last weekend conveyed the sad news that another Earby soldier, belonging the 9th Battalion Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, had been killed in action. The letter ran as follows:–

May 4th, 1916.

“You must excuse me not writing before. We have been having a rough time of it lately. We lost about 100 last week. No doubt you will have heard about J. Walsh getting killed, and Lieut. Pickles (son of Mr. S. Pickles of Barnoldswick, whose death was reported last week) who used to be with our Allan. Well, dear mother, we went to see the graves of the boys we had lost last night. We are now out for a rest. It is a grand place where they are buried; Walsh and Lieut. Pickles are laid side by side. You must tell Mrs. Walsh I am getting some flowers to put on their graves, and shall see they are all right every time I come out of the trenches. Jim had not been with us long, but he was liked by all the Company. It was a blow to me when I got to know.”

Private James Walsh (9th Duke of Wellington’s), official notification of whose death has since been received, was the eldest son of Mr. Thos. Walsh, 79, Colne Road, Earby. He was 25 years of age, and unmarried. Originally attached to the Dardanelles Expedition, he was wounded at the Suvla Bay landing last summer, and after recovering spent four weeks at home before going to France two months ago. He was for several years a member of the Earby Brass Band.

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