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James BURY

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Surname: BURY

Forename(s): James

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Service No: 265485

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 'D' Coy 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 32

Date of Death: 1918-04-13

Awards: D.C.M., M.M., M.I.D.

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: Panel 6.

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: BARNOLDSWICK, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

James Bury was the son of James and Mary Ellen Bury, née Blundell. James, senior, was born at Ewood, Blackburn and Mary at Lydiate, Lancashire.

1891 Livesey, Lancashire Census: 3, Percy Street - James Bury, aged 6 years, born Blackburn, Lancashire, son of James and Mary E. Bury.

1901 Blackburn, Lancashire Census: 145, Burnley Road - James Bury, aged 16 years, born Blackburn, son of James and Mary E. Bury.

1911 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: 6, East Parade - James Bury, aged 26 years, born Blackburn, Lancashire, son of James and Mary Ellen Bury.

The British Army Pension Record for James Bury (7616) exists but may be incomplete. [James served with the Manchester Regiment prior to the Great War.]

The British Army Service Record for James Bury exists but may be incomplete.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: L/Cpl James Bury, 2308; Sgt 265485, 1/6 W. Rid. R. Theatre of War first served in: (1) France. Date of entry therein: 14.4.15. K. in A. 13.4.18.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: Sgt James Bury, 265485, 1/6 W. Rid. R. K. in A. 13.4.18.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: Sergt James Bury (D.C.M.), 265485, 1/6th Bn W. Riding. Date and Place of Death: 13.4.18 France. To whom Authorised/Amount Authorised: Father - James. £48 17s. 0d.

James is commemorated in the 'Blackburn Roll of Honour 1914-1918'.

A short biography of James is included in: ‘Barnoldswick - A small Town’s part in conflicts 1800 to 2014’ by Peter Ian Thompson (2014).

See also: ‘Guiseley Terriers: A Small Part in The Great War - A History of the 1/6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment’ by Stephen Barber (2018).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

BURY, Sgt. James, aged 32 years, [Barnoldswick], West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Bury, killed in action.

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Sergeant James BURY

Sergeant James BURY

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: BURY

Forename(s): James

Born: Blackburn, Lancs

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorks

Enlisted: Skipton, Yorks

Number: 265485

Rank: Sergt

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 1/6th Battalion

Decorations: D.C.M., M.M.

Died Date: 13/04/18

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: BURY

Forename(s): James

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 265485

Rank: Serjeant

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 1st/6th Bn.

Age: 32

Awards: D C M, M M, Mentioned in Despatches

Died Date: 13/04/1918

Additional Information: Son of Mr. and Mrs. James Bury, of 8, Victoria Rd., Barnoldswick, Yorks.

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Citations of the Distinguished Conduct Medal, 1914-1920

2308 Sgt. J. Bury, 1/6th Bn., W. Rid. R., T. F. (LG 21 June 1916).

For conspicuous gallantry. When the enemy bombed a post of which he was in charge, causing some casualties, he stuck to the post and bombed the enemy back single-handed. This is not the first occasion on which he has shown great courage.

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St Mary-le-Ghyll Churchyard, Barnoldswick

St Mary-le-Ghyll Churchyard, Barnoldswick

Family gravestone

St Mary-le-Ghyll Churchyard, Barnoldswick

St Mary-le-Ghyll Churchyard, Barnoldswick

Family gravestone - detail of memorial inscription

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07 January 1916

LOCAL OFFICERS & MEN WIN DISTINCTION FOR GALLANT SERVICE IN THE FIELD

A supplement to the 'London Gazette' of Saturday last contains Sir John French's final list of recommendations for gallant and distinguished conduct in the Field. The despatch in which Sir John French brings the names to the notice of the Secretary for War is dated November 30. The Secretary of War Office announces that a list of honours and rewards, based on the recommendations, will be published on the earliest possible date.

The following officers, N.C.O.s and men of the 6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, are included in the Field Marshall's list:-

Capt. (Temp. Major) C. M. Bateman.
Capt. N. B. Chaffers.
Capt. A. B. Clarkson.
Capt. S. F. Marriner, W.R. Regt. (adjutant).
Lieut. M.C.M. Law (deceased).
Regt. Sergeant-Major O. Buckley No. 2870.
Corpl. J. Bury, No. 2308.
Corpl. H. Calvert, No. 2180.
Corpl. T.W. Limmer, No. 2165.
Pte. T. Brook, No. 3375.
Pte. R. Snowden, No. 3128.
Lieut. L.G.R. Harris.
Second Lieut. J. Brierley.
Sergeant-Major E. Smeath, No. 929.
Sergt. N. Hinchcliffe, No. 603.
Sergt. A. Pearson, No. 2222.
Lance-Sergt. W. Gaynor, No. 1502.
Lance-Corpl. H. Batley, No. 426.
Lance-Corpl. J. Taylor, No. 1019.
Pte. H. Mallinson, No. 2010.
Pte. L. Shaw, No. 48.

-----

It is a sad coincidence that shortly before the publication of the above list, news should be received of the death from wounds of Lieut. Malcolm C. M. Law. Lieut. Law is the second son of Mr. Duncan G. Law, Hawksworth Hall, Guiseley, Yorkshire, and prior to the departure of the 6th West Ridings for the Front was for a period stationed at Skipton with the 2/6th Battalion.

30 June 1916

BARNOLDSWICK'S FOURTH D.C.M.

Another Barnoldswick soldier, Sergeant James Bury, of the 1/6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment (grenade company), has been awarded the D.C.M. (for conspicuous gallantry). Sergt. Bury is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Bury, 6, East Parade, Barnoldswick. He went out to France in April 1915 with the rank of Corporal. The official announcement of the exploit, which earned him the coveted distinction, reads as follows:- "For conspicuous gallantry. When the enemy bombed a post of which he was in charge, causing some casualties, he stuck to the post and bombed the enemy back single-handed. This is not the first occasion on which he has shown great courage."

In a letter to his parents a few days ago Sergt. Bury writes:- "I have left the convalescent depot and am now at the base. You will no doubt know that I have got the D.C.M. There are a lot of the boys here - Dave Russell, and lots of my old bombers. I can see us having some fun when we get back up the line. I went in front of 'Bones' this morning and he is doping me with iron tonic or something like that, but I am marked 'active' and there isn't anything wrong with me. I have seen a lot of Barnoldswickers and they are all in the pink. I am going down the town if I get a chance before I renew my acquaintance with Fritz."

Sergt. Bury was, prior to the outbreak of war, a prominent member of the Barnoldswick Football Club, and worked as a weaver at Messrs. Dugdale and Dewhurst's Wellhouse Mill. One of his brothers is in the Coldstream Guards.

The previous holders of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are: Pte. Fred Bracewell, Sergt. P. B. Garratt and Quarter-Master Sergeant J. [F.] Green.

20 October 1916

BARNOLDSWICK'S FIFTH D.C.M.

News is to hand that Pte. John Edward Pickup, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene, Barnoldswick, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Pte. Pickup, who is 23 years of age, went out with the Duke of Wellington's in April 1915 as a stretcher-bearer, and is the third Barnoldswick stretcher-bearer to earn that distinction, the others being Sergeant P.H. Garratt and Pte. Fred Bracewell. Two other Barlickers in the same regiment who were awarded the D.C.M. were Co.-Sergt.-Major Green (since killed) and Sergeant James Bury.

In a letter acquainting his parents of the fact, Pte. Pickup says:- "I have just been presented with the D.C.M. ribbon, and I shall be receiving the medal very likely before long."

Before joining the Army he worked as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.'s, Long Ing.

29 December 1916

BARNOLDSWICK - HONOURING A D.C.M. WINNER

A pleasing touch of variety was given to the annual Christmas gathering in connection with the Wesleyan Sunday School on Monday evening by the presentation of a wristlet watch with luminous dial to Sergt. James Bury, an old scholar, in recognition of his winning the D.C.M. Mr. R. Kendall presided over a large attendance.

In making the presentation the Rev. A. Bradfield said they all felt proud of the boys who had belonged to their Sunday School who had shown themselves possessed of qualities little suspected. While they remained at home their parents and friends valued them greatly, but now the country had begun to show its appreciation of their noble service. He felt proud to be associated with a Sunday School which had four D.C.M. winners amongst its old boys (applause) - Pte. Bracewell, Sergt. Garratt, Sergt. Bury, and Pte. Pickup. The three first named had all now been similarly honoured, and they were anxiously awaiting the home coming of Pte. Pickup in order to make a presentation to him also.
Segt. Bury made a neat little speech in response, modestly asserting that there were hundreds of his pals who had deserved the honour equally with himself.

Songs, &c., were rendered during the evening by Miss N. Simpson, Mr. E. Lambert, Mr. J. Horsfield, and Mr. Duckworth.

Mr. T. Bracewell (secretary) gave an encouraging report of the progress of the school, which has now a total roll of 500 in the three departments.

12 January 1917

BARNOLDSWICK - PRESENTATION TO SERGT. BURY

The employees of Messrs. Dugdale and Dewhurst, Wellhouse Mill, have presented to Sergt. Jas. Bury a marble timepiece, in recognition of his winning the D.C.M. Sergt. Bury was formerly a weaver at the above firm, and recently returned to the Front.

23 March 1917

BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S DOUBLE HONOUR

Sergeant James Bury, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, upon who was conferred the Distinguished Conduct Medal in November, 1915, has just been awarded the Military Medal in recognition of a special act of gallantry in which he and five others successfully carried out a night raid upon a German trench. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Bury, 6, East Parade, Barnoldswick, and was formerly a weaver at Messrs. Dugdale and Dewhurst's Wellhouse Mill.

13 April 1917

BARNOLDSWICK D.C.M. WINNER KILLED IN ACTION

Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, yesterday received a letter from Captain Ogston, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, confirming the report of the death of their son, Private John Edward Pickup, a stretcher-bearer in the same Battalion, as having been killed in action on March 29th. The writer added:- "The reason for my not writing before was because he was missing for some little time, but was later found and buried in the English Cemetery. I cannot speak too highly of him; he was one of the best stretcher-bearers in the battalion and an excellent soldier. It may be some consolation to you to know that he suffered no pain."

The circumstances of Pte. Pickup's death are more fully described in the following letter (dated April lst) from Sergt. J. H. Whiteley, another Barlicker in the same battalion:- "As sergeant in charge of the stretcher bearers I feel it is my duty to let you know about Johnny. We had a bombing raid into the German trenches in the early morning of the 29th, and nine of us stretcher-bearers had to go with them. Johnny and another Barlicker went over with the first lot. He never came back, and I never saw him after he went over, but Jim Bury says he was close beside him when a shell came and killed him. I and some more S.B.'s searched all over but could not find the least trace of him, and parties have been out every night since, but without success. We cannot tell what has become of him. He may possibly be a prisoner, but I am afraid there is not much chance of that. We did our best to find him and I am very sorry we did not succeed, so that we could have given him a decent burial if killed. He was a favourite in the Battalion with both officers and men, and I feel certain he would have got something beside the D.C.M. if he had only pulled through. He had been with me at the Medical Aid Post for some time, and we were very good friends. I feel his loss keenly, but I know it will be a lot worse for you at home. All the lads from Barnoldswick send their sympathy. They all miss him, and would have done anything to save him. He was bringing in a wounded man when he was hit, and they are both missing. He was the best lad I had - always willing and cheerful and a hard worker - afraid of nothing, and was in rare spirits at the thought of going over the top. He met his death like a hero, I am certain, doing his duty nobly. He was a son to be proud of."

Pte. Pickup was 24 years of age. He had been in France two years, and was awarded the D.C.M. in October last, being the fifth Barnoldswick man to win that distinction. Before enlisting he was employed as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.'s sheeting works. Three of his brothers are serving in France, one in Ireland, and the other in the Navy.

26 April 1918

Sergeant James Berry, D.C.M., M.M., Barnoldswick - Officer's Glowing Tribute

A promising and honourable career has been cut short by the death of Sergeant James Bury, D.C.M., M.M., of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, particulars of which have been received in the following letter to Mr. Jas. Bury, 6 East Parade, Barnoldswick, from Captain B. Godfrey Buxton, O.C., 'D' Company:-

"Dear Mr. Bury, - No words can express my grief in having to inform you that your son, Sergeant James Bury, was killed in action whilst commanding his platoon in defence against a great German attack. At the time they were fairly surrounded, and he had just completed his orders for them to fight their way through when he was hit through the chest and killed. The platoon carried out his orders with the greatest courage.

"There are, indeed, few fathers who have more reason to be prouder of their sons than you. He was a leader born, and he died leading. Earlier in the day, in a warm corner, his next platoon commander asked, when the enemy were attacking and no one was on their flanks: "Are we to go back or forward?" "Forward!" said Sergeant Bury, and they met the enemy successfully with the bayonet.

"I have often, perhaps six months in all, had him Acting Company Sergeant-Major and found, when going round with him during bombardment, or in the attack at Passchendale last time, he proved himself a brave and inspired comrade, and one whose advice was always worth listening to with care. He was the next N.C.O. in the battalion for C.S.M., and had already refused the post of C.Q.M.S. because he said he knew he could lead the men and get more out of them than most. There was none in the Division who knew more about bombs and explosives, or who taught men in action better how to use them. He usually made a poor soldier a good one by his enthusiasm, but perhaps the best proof of his excellence is the fact that the first bombers he trained are now my senior, and best N.C.O.s.

"Please accept from us all in 'D' Company, as well as all his friends in the Battalion and Brigade, our very real sympathy in the loss of so gallant a son. Yours sincerely, B. GODFREY BUXTON, Capt.

Sergeant Bury was 32 years of age and unmarried. He had previously served in South Africa, whither he went at the age of 16 years, and stayed just over two years. He rejoined the Colours immediately after the outbreak of war, and went to France on April 14th 1915. The. D.C.M. was conferred upon him in June 1916, and the M.M. in April last year.

25 October 1918

POSTHUMOUS WAR HONOURS

Among a number of war decorations presented by Lieut -Colonel Palmer at Keighley on Sunday last were the D.C.M. and M.M. won by the late Sergeant James Bury, West Riding Regiment, who was killed in France on April 13th last. The medals were presented to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Bury, 6 East Parade, Barnoldswick. Sergeant Bury was formerly a member of the Barnoldswick Football Club. During three years' hard fighting on the Western Front he was held in the highest esteem by both officers and men.

11 April 1919

BURY – In honoured and loving memory of Sergeant James Bury, D.C.M., M.M., killed in action April 13th, 1918, after three years’ hard fighting.

A loving and thoughtful son -
A good soldier - one of England's best.

From his parents, Brothers and Sisters, 6 East Parade, Barnoldswick.

07 May 1920

BURY - In loving memory of my dear brother, Sergt. James Bury, D.C.M., M.M., Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regt., who gave his life on the 13th April, 1918, "for God, for King and Country."

From his loving Sister Alice Howell Waites, H.B., New Zealand. Also in the loving thoughts of those he left behind at home, 6 East Parade, Barnoldswick.

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30 June 1916

BARNOLDSWICK'S FOURTH D.C.M.

Another Barnoldswick soldier, Sergeant James Bury, of the 1/6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment (Grenade Company), has been awarded the D.C.M. for conspicuous gallantry. Sergt. Bury is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Bury, 6, East Parade, Barnoldswick. He went out to France in April 1915 with the rank of Corporal. The official announcement of the exploit, which earned him the coveted distinction, reads as follows:- 'For conspicuous gallantry. When the enemy bombed a post of which he was in charge, causing some casualties, he stuck to the post and bombed the enemy back single-handed. This is not the first occasion on which he has shown great courage.'

In a letter to his parents a few days ago Sergt. Bury writes:- "I have left the Convalescent Depot and am now at the base. You will no doubt know that I have got the D.C.M. There are a lot of the boys here - Dave Russell, and lots of my old bombers. I can see us having some fun when we get back up the line. I went in front of 'Bones' this morning and he is dosing me with iron tonic or something like that, but I am marked 'active' and there isn't anything wrong with me. . . . I have seen a lot of Barlickers and they are all in the pink. I am going down the town if I get a chance before I renew my acquaintance with Fritz."

The previous holders of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are: Pte. Fred Bracewell, Sergt. P. H. Garratt and Quarter-Master Sergeant J. Green.

Sergt. Bury was, prior to the outbreak of war, a prominent member of the Barnoldswick Football Club, and worked as a weaver at Messrs. Dugdale and Dewhurst's Wellhouse Mill. One of his brothers is in the Coldstream Guards.

20 October 1916

BARNOLDSWICK - 'BARLICKS' FIFTH D.C.M.

News is to hand that Private John Edward Pickup, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene, Barnoldswick, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Private Pickup, who is 23 years of age, went out with the Duke of Wellington's in April 1915 as a stretcher-bearer, and is the third Barnoldswick stretcher-bearer to earn that distinction, the others being Sergeant P.H. Garratt and Private Fred Bracewell. Two other Barlickers in the 'Duke's' who were awarded the D.C.M. were Company-Sergeant-Major Green (since killed) and Sergeant James Bury.

In a letter acquainting his parents of the fact, Private Pickup says: "I have just been presented with the D.C.M. ribbon, and I shall be receiving the medal very likely before long." Before joining the army he worked as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co., Long Ing.

12 January 1917

BARNOLDSWICK

Last week the employees of Messrs. Dugdale and Dewhurst, Wellhouse Mill, presented Sergt. Jas. Bury with a marble timepiece, in recognition of his winning the D.C.M. Sergt. Bury was formerly a weaver at the above firm, and recently returned to the front.

23 March 1917

BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S DOUBLE HONOUR

Sergt. James Bury, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, upon whom was conferred the Distinguished Conduct Medal in November 1915, has just been awarded the Military Medal in recognition of a special act of gallantry in which he and five others successfully carried out a night-raid upon a German trench. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Bury, 6, East Parade, Barnoldswick, and was formerly a weaver at Messrs. Dugdale and Dewhurst's Wellhouse Mill.

13 April 1917

BARNOLDSWICK D C.M. WINNER KILLED IN FRANCE

Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, yesterday received a letter from Captain Ogston, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, confirming the report of the death of their son, Private John Ed. Pickup, a stretcher-bearer in the same battalion, as having been killed in action on March 29th. The writer added:- "The reason for my not writing before was because he was missing for some little time, but was later found and buried in the English cemetery. I cannot speak too highly of him; he was one of the best stretcher-bearers in the battalion and an excellent soldier. It may be some consolation to you to know that he suffered no pain."

The circumstances of Private Pickup's death are more fully described in the following letter (dated April lst) from Sergt. J.H. Whiteley, another 'Barlicker' in the same battalion:- "As sergeant in charge of the stretcher-bearers I feel it is my duty to let you know about Johnny. We had a bombing raid into the German trenches in the early morning of the 29th, and nine of us stretcher-bearers had to go with them. Johnny and another 'Barlicker' went over with the first lot. He never came back, and I never saw him after he went over, but Jim Bury says he was close beside him when a shell came and killed him. I and some more stretcher-bearers searched all over but could not find the least trace of him, and parties have been out every night since, but without success. We cannot tell what has become of him. He may possibly be a prisoner, but I am afraid there is not much chance of that. We did our best to find him, and I am very sorry we did not succeed, so that we could have given him a decent burial if killed. He was a favourite in the battalion with both officers and men, and I feel certain he would have got something beside the D.C.M. if he had only pulled through. He had been with me at the Medical Aid Post for some time, and we were very good friends. I feel his loss keenly, but I know it will be a lot worse for you at home. All the lads from Barnoldswick send their sympathy. They all miss him, and would have done anything to save him. He was bringing in a wounded man when he was hit, and they are both missing. He was the best lad I had - always willing and cheerful and a hard worker - afraid of nothing, and was in rare spirits at the thought of going over the top. He met his death like a hero, I am certain, doing his duty nobly. He was a son to be proud of."

Pte. Pickup was 24 years of age. He had been in France two years, and was awarded the D.C.M. in October last, being the fifth Barnoldswick man to win that distinction. Before enlisting he was employed as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.'s sheeting works. Three of his brothers are serving in France, one in Ireland, and the other in the navy.

25 January 1918

WESLEYAN 'AT HOMES' - INTERESTING PRESENTATION

BARNOLDSWICK

These popular gatherings were held an Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings last week, and in spite of numerous counter attractions were accorded a fair amount of patronage. An interesting feature on the opening night was the presentation of a wristlet watch to Pte. Linnaeus Pilkington, a stretcher-bearer in the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, in recognition of his winning the Military Medal. Pte. Pilkington's parents now reside at Nelson, but he attended the Wesleyan Sunday School for 12 years before leaving Barnoldswick and is on the 'Roll of Honour.' The Rev. A. Bradfield, (sup. minister), in the course of a few remarks said the conferment of the medal to Pte. Pilkington made the seventh distinction of its kind worn by former scholars. One of these (Sergt. J. Bury) had been awarded both the D.C.M. and the M.M., while the remainder were five stretcher-bearers all belonging to the same battalion, viz., Sergt. P.H. Garratt., Sergt. J. Whiteley, Pte. F. Bracewell (D.C.M). Pte. J.S. [J.E.] Pickup (killed). and Pte. Pilkington. The latter was loudly cheered on rising to receive the watch, which was buckled to his wrist by Mrs. J. Toft (who presided).

26 April 1918

BURY - Killed in action, Sergt. James Bury, of the Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Bury, of Barnoldswick, aged 33.

26 April 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Sergt. James Bury, D.C.M., M.M.

Officer's Glowing Tribute

A most promising and honourable career has been cut short by the death of Sergt. James Bury, D.C.M., M.M., of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, particulars of which have been received in the following letter to Mr Jas. Bury, 6, East Parade, Barnoldswick, from Capt. B. Godfrey Buxton, officer commanding 'D' Company:-"Dear Mr. Bury, - No words can express my grief in having to inform you that your son, Sergeant Jas. Bury, was killed in action whilst commanding his platoon in defence against a great German attack. At the time they were fairly surrounded, and he had just completed his orders for them to fight their way through when he was hit though the chest and killed. The platoon carried out his orders with the greatest courage. There are, indeed, few fathers who have more reason to be proud of their sons than you. He was a leader born, and he died leading. Earlier in the day, in a warm corner, his next platoon commander asked when the enemy were attacking and no one was on their flanks, "Are we to go back or forward?" "Forward," said Sergt. Berry, and they met the enemy successfully with the bayonet. I have often, perhaps six mouths in all, had him Acting-Company Sergeant Major, and found when going round with him during bombardments, or in the attack at Passchendaele, last time, he proved himself a brave and inspiring comrade, and one whose advice was always worth listening to with care. He was the next N.C.O. in the battalion for C.S.M., and had already refused the post of Company Quarter-Master-Sergt., because he said he knew he could lead the men and get more out of them than most. There was none in the Division who knew more about bombs and explosives, or who taught men in action better how to use them. He usually made a poor soldier a good one by his enthusiasm, but perhaps the best proof of his excellence is the fact that the first bombers he trained are now my senior and best N.C.O.'s. Please accept from us all in 'D' Company, as well as all his friends in the Battalion and Brigade, our very real sympathy in the loss of so gallant a son. - Yours sincerely, B. Godfrey Buxton, Captain." Sergt. Bury was 32 years of age, and unmarried. He had previously served in South Africa, whither he went at the age of 19 years, and stayed just over two years. He rejoined the colours immediately after the outbreak of war, and went to France on April 14th, 1915. The D.C.M. was conferred upon him in June, 1916, and the M.M. in April last year.

25 October 1918

Medals Presented to Local Heroes

The 5th Battalion of the West Riding Volunteers were on Sunday inspected on the Keighley Golf Links by Col. Palmer, of the 3rd Leicestershire Regiment, the battalion to which the Volunteers are attached. Colonel Palmer said that was the first opportunity he had had of seeing the Volunteers on parade since they became attached to his battalion. He had often heard them spoken of and sometimes jested about, but after what he had seen he could be sure they were more or less disciplined soldiers. Colonel Palmer presented a Military Medal to Sergt. Edmondson, of Settle, for bravery in the field, a Military Medal and a D.C.M. to the father of the late Sergt. James Bury, of Barnoldswick, for conspicuous gallantry when the enemy bombed the post of which he was in charge; and a Military Medal to the widow of Corpl. G. Page, of Ingrow, Keighley, for bravery in the field.

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