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James WALLING

Main CPGW Record

Surname: WALLING

Forename(s): James

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 29963

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 5th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 21

Date of Death: 1918-11-17

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: II. G. 1.

CWGC Cemetery: BERLIN SOUTH-WESTERN CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: BARNOLDSWICK, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

James Walling was the son of Francis and Hannah Fawcett Walling, née Collins and brother of Private David Walling (40749) (q.v.). Their father Francis was born at Preston Patrick, Westmorland and mother, Hannah, at Darlington, Co. Durham.

1901 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: East Hill Street - James Walling, aged 3 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Francis and Hannah F. Walling.

1911 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: 16, Ash Grove Terrace - James Walling, aged 13 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Francis and Hannah Walling.

The British Army Service Record for James Walling exists but may be incomplete.

James was originally buried at Riesa Communal Cemetery, Saxony, Germany.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: Pte James Walling, 29963, 1/6 W. Rid. R., 9 W. Rid. R., 5 W. Rid. R. Died 17.11.18.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: Pte James Walling, 29963, 5/Bn W. Riding. Date and Place of Death: 17.11.18 Germany. To whom Authorised: Father - Francis. Amount Authorised: £26 17s. 7d.

On the 30 January 1918, the 1/5th Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) was transferred from the 49th (West Riding) Division to the 62nd (2/West Riding) Division and absorbed the 2/5th Battalion becoming the 5th Battalion.

A short biography of James is included in: ‘Barnoldswick - A small Town’s part in conflicts 1800 to 2014’ by Peter Ian Thompson (2014).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

WALLING, James, aged 21 years, West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Walling, 20, Clifford Street, [Barnoldswick], died from catarrh, Germany, Nov. 17, 1918.

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Private James WALLING

Private James WALLING

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: WALLING

Forename(s): James

Born: Barnoldswick, Yorks

Residence:

Enlisted: Barnoldswick

Number: 29963

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 2/5th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 17/11/18

Died How: Died

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: WALLING

Forename(s): James

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 29963

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 5th Bn.

Age: 21

Awards:

Died Date: 17/11/1918

Additional Information: Son of Francis and Hannah Walling, of 8, Bank St., Barnoldswick, Yorks. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: TO LIVE IN HEARTS WE LEAVE BEHIND IS NOT TO DIE)

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10 August 1917

BARNOLDSWICK – A MYSTERY CLEARED UP

About three months ago we gave a circumstantial report (with photograph) of the death of Pte. David Walling, Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walling, 20, Clifford Street, who had been killed in action in France. Pte. Walling was first reported missing (April [February] 11th), but shortly afterwards a letter was received from a Barnoldswick comrade, Pte. W. Smith [died of wounds, 6 May 1917], giving particulars of the time and place of his death, which, in the absence of official news, the family felt constrained to accept as authentic. After a lapse of several weeks, however, the hopes of the family were suddenly revived by the receipt of a telegram signed ‘David’ which [had] been sent from St. Pancras, from which it was inferred that the sender might be expected home on the morrow. The telegram, somewhat ambiguously worded, was addressed to a resident in a neighbouring street, whose wife, evidently unacquainted with the sender, jumped to the conclusion that it was intended for a married sister of Pte. Walling (who bore the same surname as the recipient), and residing in the same street, to whom the telegram was ultimately given. Quite naturally the parents clung to the hope that the report of his death might prove erroneous and that they would have the supreme pleasure of welcoming their son back from the dead. Thus for two or three whole days were they kept in a ferment of expectation and uncertainty, meeting every train, but alas! ‘no David.’ After a further period of agonizing suspense, and ready to clutch at every alternative, the parents communicated with another son who is in training near London, asking him to make inquiries, on the off-chance that David might have been unavoidably detained in London or might be suffering from temporary loss of memory. The consent of the military authorities was readily granted on the position being explained to them, and for two days the young man prosecuted a diligent search round the military hospitals and Red Cross agencies, with no better result. At length, however, the tangle has been unravelled by an official announcement from the War office confirming the death of Pte. Walling as having occurred on April 11th. He was 25 years of age and married. The case has naturally aroused a good deal of local interest and the family have been the recipients of numerous sympathetic letters and enquiries.

On Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Walling received a letter from a Barnoldswick comrade in the same regiment, stating that their younger son, Pte. James Walling, Duke of Wellington’s, had been slightly wounded by shrapnel in the right knee, after being in France six months.

30 August 1918

BARNOLDSWICK – Good News

On Sunday Mr. and Mrs. F. Walling, 20 Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, were re-assured on receiving a postcard from their son, Private Jas. Walling, West Riding Regiment, stating that he was a prisoner in Germany and quite well. Only two days previously they had received an official intimation that he had been missing since 22nd July. Mr. and Mrs. Walling have had one son killed in the war.

28 March 1919

BARNOLDSWICK – PRISONER’S DEATH IN GERMANY

After being reported ‘missing’ since last July, news has come through this week to Mr. and Mrs. Francis Walling, 20 Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, that their son, Pte. James Walling, West Riding Regt., died on the 17th November at Riosa, Germany, from influenza and intestinal catarrh. He was 21 years of age. This is the second bereavement Mr. and Mrs. Walling have sustained during the war, an elder son, Pte. David Walling, N.F., being killed at Armentieres in February, 1917. Pte. Tom Walling (eldest son) is in hospital in France recovering from pneumonia.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

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10 August 1917

BARNOLDSWICK

A MYSTERY CLEARED UP

About three months ago we gave a circumstantial report (with photo) of the death of Pte. David Walling, Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walling, 20, Clifford Street, who had been killed in action in France. Pte. Walling was first reported missing (April 11th), but shortly afterwards a letter was received from a Barnoldswick comrade, Pte. W. Smith, giving particulars of the time and place of his death, which in the absence of official news, the family felt constrained to accept as authentic. After a lapse of several weeks, however, the hopes of the family were suddenly revived by the receipt of a telegram signed “David,” which had been sent from St. Pancras, from which it was inferred that the sender might be expected home on the morrow. The telegram, somewhat ambiguously worded, was addressed to a resident in a neighbouring street whose wife, evidently unacquainted with the sender, jumped to the conclusion that it was intended for a married sister of Pte. Walling (who bore the same surname as the recipient), and living in the same street to whom the telegram was ultimately handed. Quite naturally the parents clung to the hope that the report of his death night prove erroneous, and that they would have the supreme pleasure of welcoming their son back from the dead. Thus for two or three whole days were they kept in a ferment of expectation and uncertainty, meeting every train, but alas! “no David.” After a further period of agonizing suspense, and ready to clutch at every alternative, the parents communicated with another son who is in training near London, asking him to make enquiries, on the off-chance that David might have been unavoidably detained in London or might be suffering from temporary loss of memory. The consent of the military authorities was readily granted on the position being explained to them, and for two days the young man prosecuted a diligent search round the military hospitals and Red Cross Agencies, with no better result. At length, however, the tangle has been unravelled by an official announcement from the War Office confirming the death of Pte. Walling, as having occurred on April 11th. He was 25 years of age and married Tho case has naturally aroused a good deal of local interest, and the family have been the recipients of numerous sympathetic letters and enquiries.

On Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Walling received a letter from a Barnoldswick comrade in the same regiment, stating that their younger son, Pte. James Walling, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, had been slightly wounded by shrapnel in the right knee, after being in France six months.

30 August 1918

Barnoldswick Prisoner

On Sunday Mr. and Mrs. F. Walling, 20, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, were re-assured on receiving a post card from their son, Pte. Jas. Walling, West Riding Regiment, stating that he was a prisoner in Germany and quite well. Only two days previously they had received an official intimation that he had been missing since 22nd July. Mr. and Mrs. Walling have had one son killed in the war.

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