Top Navigation

John CARROLL

Main CPGW Record

Surname: CARROLL

Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Skipton, Yorkshire

Service No: 5841

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion / Unit: 1st Battalion

Division: 4th Division

Age: 42

Date of Death: 1917-07-09

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: 169A.

CWGC Cemetery: SKIPTON (ST. STEPHEN’S) ROMAN CATHOLIC CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

John Carroll was the son of Bryan and Bridget Carroll (née Breslane?) and brother of Private Patrick Carroll (165327) (q.v.). Their parents were born in Co. Sligo, Ireland.

1881 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 22, Club Houses: John Carroll, aged 6 years, born Skipton, son of Bryan and Bridget Carroll.

1891 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 7, Club Houses - John Carroll, aged 16 years, born Skipton, son of Brian and Bridget Carroll.

The British Army Pension Record for John Carroll exists but may be incomplete.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte John Carroll, 5841, 1st East Lancashire Regiment. Theatre of war served in: ( - ) [France]. Date of entry therein: 22 August 1914.

The photograph in the CPGW book for John Carroll shows a soldier wearing the Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) cap badge: this is, in fact, a photograph of his brother Patrick Carroll.

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

CARROLL, John. [Additional]

---

No photo available for this Soldier
Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: East Lancashire Regiment

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: East Lancashire Regiment

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 4th Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 4th Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: No entry in SDGW.

Forename(s):

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank:

Regiment:

Battalion:

Decorations:

Died Date:

Died How:

Theatre of War:

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: CARROLL

Forename(s): J

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 5841

Rank: Private

Regiment: East Lancashire Regiment

Unit:

Age:

Awards:

Died Date: 09/07/1917

Additional Information: (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: REST IN PEACE)

---

View Additional Image(s)

Additional Photo(s) For Soldier Records

St Stephen's Churchyard, Skipton

St Stephen's Churchyard, Skipton

CWGC joint headstone for Private John Carroll and his brother Private Patrick Carroll - [Personal inscription: 'REST IN PEACE']

View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

06 July 1917

A WAR SCANDAL - SKIPTON SOLDIER IN THE WORKHOUSE WITHOUT PENSION

In all kinds of circles since the war commenced, the fervent hope has been expressed time and time again that our soldiers would not receive the disgraceful treatment after the war as too many of our brave fellows have done after previous conflicts. Unhappily there have already been cases where gallant men who have risked their lives on the battlefield have come home broken in body and unable to earn a living, to receive the scantiest and most ungenerous treatment at the hands of officials who are apparently bound hand and foot by the infamous red-tape which plays such a conspicuous part in the public departments of this country.

Such a case has come to our notice this week in which the sufferer is a Skiptonian who has fought in both the South African and the present war. John Carroll, the son of a former well-known Skipton plasterer, joined the 1st East Lancashire Regiment as a young man on December 9th 1898, and served with the Colours for the ensuing seven years, during which time he took part in the Boer War. In December 1905, he was placed on the reserve for five years - until December 1910, when he was again transferred to Section 'D' for four years. As a reservist he was recalled to the Colour on August 5th 1914, and went out to France with the first British Expeditionary Force - the 'contemptible little Army' which covered itself with glory at Mons and other places, and laid the foundation for what everyone believes will be the ultimate defeat of the German hordes.

For fifteen long months, including the trying winter of 1914-15, Pte. Carroll endured the hardships of the battlefield, and then in December 1915 he was granted his discharge as a time-expired man. At that time, in accordance with custom, the War Office offered him a bounty of £29 and a month's furlough to persuade him to remain with the Colours till the termination of the war. The poor fellow, however, felt that he could not again face the hardships and horrors of war, and declined what must be to him to have been a most tempting offer.

When Pte. Carroll left the Army in December 1915, he had actually served eight years and three months with the Colours, had fought in two wars, and had been on the reserve for something like nine years. And yet he had no pension! Thus does a grateful (?) country reward the men who have fought for her honour on foreign battlefields. Cabinet Ministers, civil servants, and other public officials can get their pensions with a minimum of trouble, but a poor soldier, who time and time again has risked his life for a shilling a day, is thrown onto the mercy of the general public and often has to end his days in the Workhouse.

After leaving the Army, Pte. Carroll was able to eke out an existence until about April last, when he was compelled to go into the sanatorium at the Skipton Union Workhouse. After a few weeks' rest there he left the Institution in the hope of finding work in the hayfields, but within a short time he was again taken ill and had no alternative but to return to the Institution, where he still remains, a man of only 42, broken in body and spirit. While in the Institution his case has been before the Skipton War Pensions Committee. This Committee, we understand, is only empowered to grant assistance to dependents of soldiers, and as Carroll is not now in the Army and has no dependents, the Committee were bound - reluctantly, no doubt - to come to the conclusion that he had no case.

Since the war began numerous charitable funds have been organised, and have been well supported, to relieve deserving cases of distress caused by the war. Surely this is one of those cases, and surely it should be someone's duty to see that this poor man should be provided with the ordinary comforts of life. He has done his 'bit' and deserves a better fate than to have to pass the remainder of his days in the Workhouse.

13 July 1917

MONS HERO DIES IN THE WORKHOUSE - SKIPTON SOLDIER'S DISTRESSING STORY

John Carroll, of Skipton, one of the few remaining heroes of Mons, whose distressing story was told in the 'Craven Herald' last week, died from consumption in the sanatorium at the Skipton Union Workhouse on Monday, at the age of forty-two. When the poor fellow returned to the institution early last month it was noticed that he was in a pitiful condition and his recovery seemed almost hopeless. He seemed to be quite aware of the seriousness of his condition, as when he was seen by our representative last week and told that efforts were being made to secure him a pension, he remarked that it was not much good as he was "not long for this world."

Carroll's sad story, as outlined in our columns last week, has raised widespread sympathy, and in many quarters indignation has been expressed that a soldier with his record should, in his last hours of need, have to seek the shelter of the Workhouse. The Master at the Skipton Workhouse (Mr. Nowell) had several enquiries about him after our last week's issue, and a sympathetic friend from Ripon sent him a pipe, and some tobacco. Alas, this kind gift came too late, for Carroll was then unconscious. The military authorities at Fulwood Barracks, Preston, the headquarters of deceased's regiment, have also been enquiring into the case.

As a young man Carroll, who was the son of a former well-known Skipton plasterer, joined the 1st East Lancashire Regiment on December 9th 1898, and served with the Colours for the ensuing seven years and fought in the Boer War. In December 1905, he was placed on the reserve for five years, at the end of which time he was transferred to Section 'D' for four years. As a reservist he was recalled to the Colours on August 5th 1914, and was a member of the first British Expeditionary Force - perhaps the finest trained body of men, from the point of efficiency, that ever went into battle. At Mons, a name that will stir the blood of Englishmen forever, and other places, Pte. Carroll took part in the great fighting against fearful odds, and for fifteen long months he endured the hardships of the campaign. As a time-expired man he was granted his discharge in December 1915, at which time the War Office offered him a bounty of £20 and a month's furlough to persuade him to remain with the Colours until the termination of the War. The poor fellow, however, felt that he could not again face the horrors and hardships of this great war and declined what must to him at that time have been a most tempting offer.

When he left the Army in December 1915, Pte. Carroll had over seventeen years' service to his credit - eight years and three months with the Colours and nine years on the reserve - and had fought in two wars. And yet he had no pension! He was able to eke out an existence until about April last, when he was compelled to go into the sanatorium at the Skipton Union Workhouse. After a few weeks' rest there he left the Institution in the hope of finding work in the hayfields, but within a short time he was again taken ill and had to return to the Institution. Whilst he was there Carroll's case was brought to the notice of the Skipton War Pensions Committee, but as he was not then in the Army, and had no dependents, they could not touch it. People have begun to ask, however, why the case could not be relieved out of the many charitable funds which have been organised in the country to relieve cases of distress caused by the War

A MILITARY FUNERAL

The funeral, which was attended with military honours, and aroused considerable public interest, took place in the burial ground of St. Stephen's Roman Catholic Church, Skipton, yesterday afternoon. Hundreds of people lined the route of the procession from the house of deceased's relatives in Newmarket Street to the Church, and the final rites were also witnessed by a large and sympathetic crowd headed by the Skipton Volunteer Band (in charge of Band Master Metcalfe), which played the 'Dead March' the whole of the way to the Church. The procession was joined by a number of wounded soldiers from the two local military hospitals, several local time-expired men, who wore on their sleeves the bit of gold braid which indicates that they have taken part in the War, a number of Skipton Volunteers, and a detachment of soldiers from Fulwood Barracks, Preston, the headquarters of deceased's regiment. Lieut. S.H. Walton, commanding officer of the local Volunteers, also joined the procession.

Along the route many blinds were drawn, and there were many other evidences of respect to the memory of one who has fought for King and Country. Soldiers in the crowd stood at attention and saluted while the cortege passed by. Another tribute of respect was the marshalling at the entrance to the Church ground of the scholars of St. Stephen's School, which deceased attended as a lad under Mr. Barry, the schoolmaster. Wrapped in a Union Jack, the coffin was carried from the Gargrave Road entrance along the drive to the Church by six soldiers of deceased's regiment. The service both in the Church and at the graveside, which was partly recited it Latin, was conducted by Father Bethell, and after the final rites the firing party from the local camp shot the customary three volleys, and the 'Last Post' was also sounded. The chief mourners included his brother, who has also served in the present war.

Wreaths were placed on the grave as follows:-

A token of affection from his wounded comrades at the Auxiliary Hospital
As a token of affection from his wounded comrades at the Cottage Hospital
A token of respect from the 6th West Riding Regiment
In remembrance from Mrs. Laycock
From Mr. Watson, railway servant, Skipton
A tribute of sincere sympathy from Mrs. Strickland and Gladys

It should be added that ex-Company Quarter-Master-Sergeant H. Minikin, of Skipton, who belonged to deceased's regiment, and Mr. T.W. Nowell, Master of the Skipton Union Workhouse, arranged the military part of the funeral. Mr. Minikin, who has been interesting himself in Carroll's case had, prior to the latter's death, communicated all the particulars to the military authorities at Preston with a view to some relief being granted from a Depot Fund which is raised for such cases, and it was also at his suggestion that a detachment from Fulwood Barracks attended the funeral. The relatives desire to tender sincere thanks to Mr. Minikin for his efforts, and to the Editor of the 'Craven Herald' for giving publicity to the facts.

20 July 1917

LOCAL NEWS

We are asked to state that the wreath placed on Pte. John Carroll's grave last week bearing the inscription '6th West Riding Regiment,' was sent by the 6th West Riding Volunteers.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

13 July 1917

MONS HERO DIES IN THE WORKHOUSE - Skipton people incensed over it

John Carrol, of 78, Newmarket Street, Skipton, one of the few remaining heroes of Mons, died at the sanatorium at the Skipton Union Workhouse, on Tuesday last. Carrol who was a Skiptonian by birth, and had fought in the South African and the present war, was the son of a former well-known Skipton plasterer. He joined the 1st East Lancashire Regiment on December 9th, 1898, and served with the colours for the ensuing seven years, during which time he took part in the Boer War. In December, 1905, he was placed on the reserve for five years, until December, 1910, when he was again transferred to Section 'D' for four years. As a reservist he was recalled to the colours on August 5th, 1914, and went out to France with the first British Expeditionary Force - the "contemptible little Army" which covered itself with glory at Mons and other places and laid the foundation for what everyone believes will be the ultimate defeat of the German hordes.

For fifteen months, including the trying winter of 1914-15, Pte. Carrol endured the hardships of the battlefield, and then in December, 1915, he was granted his discharge as a time-expired man. At that time, the War Office offered him a bounty of £20 and a month's furlough to persuade him to remain with the colours until the termination of the war. Carrol, however, felt that he could not again face the hardships and horrors of war and declined what must to him have been a most tempting offer.

When Pte. Carrol left the Army in December, 1915, he had actually served eight years and three months with the Colours, had fought in two wars, and had been in the reserve for something like nine years. And yet he had no pension!

After leaving the Army, Pte. Carrol was able to eke out an existence until about April last, when he was compelled to go into the sanatorium at the Skipton Union Workhouse. After a few weeks' rest there he left the Institution in the hope of finding work in the hayfields, but within a short time he was again taken ill and had no alternative but to return to the Institution, where his death has taken place at the age of 42 years. While in the Institution his case had been before the Skipton War Pensions Committee. This Committee, we understand, is only empowered to grant assistance to dependents of soldiers, and as Carrol was not now in the army and had no dependents the Committee were bound - reluctantly, no doubt - to come to the conclusion that he had no case.

Much local feeling has been aroused by the case, and the opinion has been freely expressed that the poor fellow ought to have been helped out of one of the many charitable funds organised since the war began. It is nothing but a scandal that such a brave hero should have been allowed to end his days in the workhouse.

The funeral took place with military honours at the St. Stephen's Roman Catholic Church burial-ground, Skipton, yesterday afternoon. From the deceased's residence in Newmarket Street to the Church, the cortège was headed by the local Volunteer Band. who played the 'Dead March.' The coffin was covered by the Union Jack, and there were in attendance a number of deceased's soldier comrades from Preston, wounded soldiers from the Skipton and District Hospital, and the Skipton Auxiliary Hospital, while Lt. S.H. Walton, commander of the local Volunteers, was also in attendance. A short service was held at the St. Stephen's Church, which was largely attended, and conducted by Rev. Father Bethel, who also officiated at the graveside. A firing party from Preston attended and fired a number of volleys over the deceased's grave, while the 'Last Post' was also sounded by two buglers. Floral tributes were sent by Mrs. Laycock (Skipton), as a token of affection from his wounded comrades at the Cottage Hospital, Mrs. Strickland and Gladys, Mr. Watson (Skipton), as a token of affection from his wounded comrades at the Auxiliary Hospital, as a token of respect from the 6th West Riding Regiment. A large number of people turned out to pay their esteem to the brave hero, while the blinds of the residences and business premises were drawn en route from the house to the church. The arrangements for the funeral were carried out by Mr. T.W. Nowell, Master at the Skipton Union, and Sergt. Minnikin.

Submit a Correction

    Name (required)

    Email Address (required)

    Telephone (required)

    Soldier Reference - Name:

    Soldier Reference - URL:

    Details of the correction to be made (required)

    Comment on this Soldier Record

    You can leave comments on this soldier record. Please note all comments will be manually approved before they appear on the website.

    No comments yet.

    Leave a Reply

    Pin It on Pinterest

    Share This