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John Robinson JACKMAN

Main CPGW Record

Surname: JACKMAN

Forename(s): John Robinson

Place of Birth: Long Preston, Yorkshire

Service No: ---

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Royal Air Force

Battalion / Unit: 98th Squadron

Division: ---

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1918-06-17

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: IV. M. 4.

CWGC Cemetery: ACHIET-LE-GRAND COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: LONG PRESTON, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SEDBERGH SCHOOL, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

John Robinson Jackman was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Mary Jackman, née Robinson. Joseph was born at Long Preston, Yorkshire and Elizabeth at Clitheroe, Lancashire.

1901 Long Preston, Yorkshire Census: The Green - John R. Jackman, aged 7 years, born Long Preston, son of Joseph and Elizabeth M. Jackson.

1911 Sedbergh, Yorkshire Census: Hart House, Sedbergh School - John Robinson Jackman, aged 17 years, born Long Preston, Yorkshire. Pupil.

The British Army Service Record for Private John Jackman (2609) exists but may be incomplete.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte; 2/Lt John Jackman, 2609, 1/6 W. Rid. R. Commissioned: 1.12.15.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte John Robinson Jackman, 2609, W. Rid. R.; Lieut W. Rid. R.; Lieut R.A.F. Theatre of War first served in: 1 [France]. Date of entry therein: 14.4.15. Commissioned 1.12.15. Correspondence: J. Jackman Esq Hughenden, Long Preston, Yorks.

See also:
'Long Preston and the Great War' by Long Preston Heritage Group (2015).
‘Guiseley Terriers: A Small Part in The Great War - A History of the 1/6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment’ by Stephen Barber (2018).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record: ---

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Lieutenant John Robinson JACKMAN

Lieutenant John Robinson JACKMAN

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Air Force

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Air Force

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: JACKMAN

Forename(s): J. R.

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: Lt

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 6th Battalion (Territorial)

Decorations:

Died Date: 22/07/18

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War:

Notes: (And R.A.F.)

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: JACKMAN

Forename(s): John Robinson

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment: 98th Sqdn. Royal Air Force and 6th Bn. Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit:

Age: 24

Awards:

Died Date: 17/06/1918

Additional Information: Son of Mr. J. Jackman and Elizabeth M. Jackman, of Hughenden, Long Preston, Yorkshire.

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SEDBERGH SCHOOL ARCHIVES

(Courtesy of Sedbergh School Archive and Heritage Centre)

SEDBERGH SCHOOL REGISTER 1908

1725 – Jackman, John Robinson: (Mr. Fowler), son of J. Jackman, Long Preston; born July 22nd, 1893; left April, 1911; Ten Miles 1911. Wool Merchant. Great War:– Lieut., West Riding Regt. and R.A.F. Killed in action June 17th, 1918.

SEDBERGH SCHOOL ARCHIVES

(Courtesy of Sedbergh School Archive and Heritage Centre)

[The following information about J.R. Jackman is from Rouge et Noir the Sedgwick House magazine. J.R. Jackman belonged to Hart House and was to win the race in 1911]

[March 1910]

TEN MILE

This race was run in very bad weather, a strong, cold, west wind was blowing, carrying with it sheets of rain, which caught the runners across the fells and met them coming along the road, in addition to this, the course was very heavy and in very bad condition. There were twenty starters, of which seventeen finished, seven being from Sedgwick House.

Scott, the Martynite favourite, led till ‘green hill,’ closely followed by Mulholland and Smith. By the time Thrush Ghyll was reached, however, he had dropped back and the order there was Mulholland, Jackman, Scott, Kaye, Smith, and Atkinson. Along the hills to Cautley Jackman assumed the lead, and at Cautley, was three hundred yards in front of Atkinson, who was the same distance in front of Mulholland, Kaye, Strother, and Scott, who came next. Difficulty was experienced by some of the runners, owing to the mist, in reaching the plantation, but here Atkinson caught up with Jackman; Strother was third, while Maxwell and Ritchie, both running strongly, were coming into the race. Over the hills down into Hebblethwaite, Atkinson went away, and at the other side of that ghyll was fifty yards ahead of Jackman, who was about three hundred in front of Strother running with Kaye, Mulholand, and Maxwell. At Danny Bridge Atkinson had increased his lead, but the order was the same. Going up the hill, however, Strother, who was running very strongly, stepping on a loose stone, strained his ankle. This misfortune cost him a high place, and it was with great difficulty that he pluckily struggled in sixth. The two leaders, therefore, had things pretty much their own way, and Atkinson came in an easy winner, a minute ahead of Jackman. Meanwhile Maxwell and Ritchie had been coming steadily along the road, and passing Kaye shortly after Danny Bridge, Strother by the town football field, and Mulholland up Punch’s hill, they finished third and fourth respectively. Strother, as we have said, was sixth, Mackintosh was tenth, Johnstone twelfth, and Burnside i. Fourteenth.

Taking the state of the weather and course into consideration, the times were very good.

It is to be noticed that although our house sent in by far the largest entry, all our men finished very fresh. This was due almost entirely to the trouble and care with which Mr. Lemarchand trained them, and his skill and experience is always a great advantage to the members of this house. The times and places of this house were:–

1, Atkinson 1-17-5.
3, Maxwell 1-22-5.
4, Ritchie 1-22-6.
6, Strother 1-23
10, Mackintosh 1-27-2.
12, Johnstone i. 1-28-29.
14, Burnside i. 1-30.

The times of the leaders at various points were, Thrush Ghyll 12 mins, Cautley 24-10, Hebblethwaite 46 mins.

Sprinting and springy, just as if he’d sat pins on,
Comes Victor Grayson–no, I mean victor Atkinson.
“Dark,” and full back, so almost fully black man,
He beats them all save one–each man jack–Jackman.
Forward in this, as well as other packs–well,
We’ll give him all due weight, twice seven stone Maxwell.
Vain the pursuit of riches! To a pitch he
Of folly mounts, who pursues after Ritchie.
Alas! wind, rain, heavy Baugh Fell’s dull “col,” and
The law are ‘gainst light weights–well run, Mulholland!
Like my poor rhyme, he sometimes trips, O bother!
Sixth, so I fear above his Form, ends Strother.

[The following information is about J.R. Jackman winning the Ten Mile Race in 1911]

1911
J.R. Jackman won by the greatest margin since C.P. Charlesworth nearly 30 years earlier.

Only 12 turned out for the race on Saturday March 18th 1911. It was the smallest field since the year of Hamlyn’s record in 1894. J.R. Jackman, who had been runner-up in 1910, took the lead at Thrush Gill and from there he went steadily ahead increasing his lead all the way. Burnside was second. This reversed the order in which they had finished the Three Mile a few years before. Jackman won by a very easy margin of 3 mins. 17 secs. Only two of C.P. Charlesworth’s victories in the early years of the race have been won by greater margins than this; and only seven races have resulted in more comfortable wins.

A strong, cold east wind and occasional showers of driving sleet made the day very unpleasant for running. Nevertheless the wind, which was against the runners most of the way, was helpful on the road back from Danny. This assisted Jackman in a very strong finish. He came back in 15 mins. 35 secs., the third fastest time ever for this part of the course. Hamlyn, when he raced back with Armitage in 1894, took 15 mins. 15 secs. The average leaders time for this stretch of the course is just 17 mins. 13 secs.

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The 'Lucky 13' taken at Riby Park, Lincolnshire, October 1914

The 'Lucky 13' taken at Riby Park, Lincolnshire, October 1914

The group, that called themselves the 'Lucky 13', were serving with the 1/6th Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) Back left to right - Walter Yates. Fred Close, Robert Clark, John M. Morphet (killed), Arthur Parker, Thomas Brayshaw, William H. Brassington (killed), William Hirst Front row, left to right - Charlie Parker, John R. Jackman (killed), John Cardus, Charles Peachey (killed), John S. Hepworth (killed)

Courtesy of The Brayshaw Library, Giggleswick School

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

Entry on Page 24

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Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

17 December 1915

LONG PRESTON – Commission for Local Soldier

Jack R. Jackman, who joined the 1st 6th Duke of Wellington’s soon after the war began, has been gazetted Second-Lieutenant. He was formerly a member of the Officers’ Training Corps at Sedbergh ----- went to France in April, and has seen ----- months of strenuous service, and was ----- fighting in the Hooge neighbourhood ----- September he received a splinter in the eye ----- caused a painful injury, from which ----- happily quite recovered. On another o----- whilst his rifle was under his arm the l----- struck and smashed by a bullet which g----- such a jar that he thought his arm was w-----.

[Above article is damaged]

12 January 1917

INGLETON – PETTY SESSIONS

Too Bright a Light

Thomas Geldard, farmer, Green Close, pleaded guilty to riding a motor cycle at Bentham on December 3rd with an acetylene lamp which was not obscured. – Fined 2s 6d.– Second-Lieutenant John Robinson Jackman, Longpreston, was similarly charged and pleaded not guilty. Defendant said he was not riding when the affair happened; he had just lit his lamp and was pushing it out of the yard. When he was told he was doing wrong he said he was very sorry, and was doing it unknowingly. He had been riding all along without any objection. The order, which was posted outside, referred to lens fronts, and his lamp had not a lens front.–The Superintendent said that the lens front only applied when oil and candles were used. It was applicable to any kind of acetylene lamp.– Fined 2s 6d.

16 November 1917

LONG PRESTON – Military Notes

Lieutenant Jackman, recently at home, has transferred from the infantry to the Flying Corps and has gone into training for his new duties at Reading. – Lieutenant Beecroft, of the Tanks, has had a month’s leave on account of his brother’s illness. – Corporal Hitchin, M.M., who was severely wounded last summer and since been in a convalescent camp in Ireland, has had a short leave before returning to France. – Private Percy Cooper has been home on draft leave. – Before these lines are printed those who are well enough will be on their way to active service again, and it is certain that all their friends wish them even better luck in the future.

28 June 1918

LONGPRESTON – Lieutenant Jackman Missing

Lieut. J.R. Jackman, Royal Air Force, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Jackman, Hughenden, Longpreston, is reported missing as from the 17th inst. A letter sent by a brother officer explains that six of them were returning after a successful bombing expedition, when they were attacked by twenty to thirty enemy machines. A fight ensued, in which two of our machines were brought down within the enemies’ lines. Lieut. Jackman was flying in one of the two. Educated at Sedbergh, he had just entered into business with his father as a wool merchant, when the war broke out. He volunteered immediately and joined the Duke of Wellington’s W.R. Regiment, going out to France in April, 1915. He was transferred to the R.F.C. in October, 1917.

31 January 1919

JACKMAN, Lieut. J. R., Duke of Wellington’s W.R. Regiment, attached Royal Air Force, only son of Joseph and Mrs. Jackman, Hughenden, Long Preston, missing since 17th June, reported from Frankfurt, and since confirmed from Charlottenberg, as shot down on fire, fighting overwhelming number of Germany’s most famous Air Squadron and buried by enemy at Quéant; grave now found by old school-fellow.

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07 May 1915

LONGPRESTON PRIVATE’S LETTER

Private John E. Beecroft, who joined the Territorials [1/6th Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)] in November last, has written to his brother in Longpreston an interesting letter. He said:–“After I had finished my last to you we were told to pack up and be ready to set off to the trenches for 24 hours. We marched from 2 to 6-30 p.m., then had to wait till dark. At 8 we started on the last mile to relieve the 13th City of London, and for 200 yards we doubled down a hedge side. We then got our baptism of fire. The German Maxims were upon us, and we sought cover whilst bullets whistled overhead. Nobody was hit, but if we had stood up we should have been wiped out. We got into the trenches at last; they were dug about 4 feet deep, and in front a parapet of sand bags 3 to 4 feet wide to make it bullet proof, and so long as one keeps down it is quite safe. I can tell you I did not want to look over the top. Now and again bullets flew past, buzzing like bees. From 3 to 4 o’clock the Huns were pumping lead across for all they were worth. They do it every morning, as they are afraid we should make an attack at dawn, which is a favourite time. They send plenty of sky rockets during the night, which light up the ground between the trenches, so that both sides can see if any men are working at the wire entanglements… We come out to-night. The other half of our battalion, that J.J. [John Robinson Jackman] is in, comes in. I am sat in the trench writing this. Most of the others are asleep or reading. Occasional shots from a German sniper is all that is going on, and an aeroplane over the German lines is getting the range for our guns, which are a good way behind us.”

Friday, 23rd April:–“We have just had a dozen shells over us. They fell about 100 yards to the rear. The Germans were firing at an old monastery. They made six hits and six misses. I have been on duty this afternoon watching for movements in the enemy’s lines, through a periscope, and acting as a sniper. I am now back at our billet, which took us five hors to reach, arriving at 1-30 this morning after a tiring march. I have just been down to J.J. He said it was their turn to go on duty on Sunday night. No one was killed or wounded whilst we were on. In fact, it is safe as being in our billet, so long as we keep our heads down… We know now what the trenches are like, and we shall be left here for a time in peace. If you are in as good spirits as I am you will not be ailing much.”

08 October 1915

LONG PRESTON TERRITORIAL WOUNDED

Pte. Jack Jackman, of Long Preston, was wounded in the eye on the 23rd September, whilst on periscope duty. A bullet struck the instrument and a splinter from the bullet entered his eye, but most fortunately did not injure the sight. A doctor removed the piece which had caused the injury, and since with having the eye attended to and dressed, the wound has healed and is now almost well again. It was a lucky escape indeed!

16 November 1917

LONG PRESTON

MILITARY NOTES – Pte. Wilfred Butt of the West Yorkshires, was in October wounded while in France. A bullet pierced his leg from front to calf and damaged the bone in passing. He was brought first to Exeter, but is now in a V.A.D. hospital at Torrington in Devonshire. Sergt. George Delves, of the Canadian Remounts, invalided to England with trench fever, has had four days leave. He is expecting to be sent back to Canada to train conscripts. Lieut. Jackman, recently at home, has transferred from the infantry to the Flying Corps, and has gone into training for his new duties at Reading. Lieut. Beecroft, of the Tanks, has had a month’s leave on account of his brother’s illness. Corpl. Hitchin, M.M., who was severely wounded last summer, and since been in a convalescent camp in Ireland, has had a short leave before returning to France. Pre. Percy Cooper has been home on draft leave. All who are well enough will soon be on their way to active service again, and it is certain that all their friends wish them even better luck in the future.

31 May 1918

LONG PRESTON

SPECIAL ORDER – “The general officer commanding R.A.F. in the field (France) has written expressing his thanks and good wishes to the officers, N.C.O.’s and men of No. 98 squadron for their fine work. He hopes the same spirit of doggedness, determination, and sacrifice will still be maintained in the battles that are to come, and looks to the squadron to keep up the reputation it has already gained, never failing.” A further message has been sent from the same source this month to a similar effect concerning No 96 Squadron, in which Lieut. Jackman is an observer, flying with Pilot Taylor.

28 June 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Long Preston Officer Missing

Lieut. J.R. Jackman, of the Royal Air Force, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Jackman, Hughenden, Long Preston, has been reported missing since June 17th. A letter sent by a brother officer explains that six of them were returning after a successful bombing expedition, when they were attacked by twenty to thirty enemy machines. A fight ensued in which two of our machines were brought down within the enemy’s lines. Lieut. Jackman was flying in one of the two. Educated at Sedbergh, he had just entered into business with his father (wool merchant) when the war broke out. He volunteered immediately, and joined the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, going out to France in April, 1915, and transferred to the R F.C. in October, 1917.

09 August 1918

REMEMBRANCE DAY: LOCAL OBSERVANCES: PULPIT MESSAGES

LONGPRESTON

August 4th was celebrated at Long Preston Parish Church in a most appropriate fashion. There were very large congregations at the holy communion and at matins, when the Vicar (Rev. R. Shipman, lately T.C.F.) preached on the ‘Day of remembrance.’ In the evening there was a united service for the whole village, and the Nonconformist Chapels were closed. The old church was crowded. Mr. S. Goldsborough, who was due to take the Baptist Chapel service, read the lessons, Rev. Mr. Elsom, Wesleyan minister, took the special prayers appointed for the day, and the Vicar took the text of the service and preached on I Pet., v. 10. His theme was the eventual strengthening of character through suffering. He pictured first the immensity of the world suffering these last four years, and alluded to the suffering and loss sustained in the village by the recent deaths of Lieut. J. Jackman, who died in Germany, and Pte. W. Butt, who died in hospital in France. Suffering and struggle, if we were true to our ideals and firm of purpose, would, pray God, lead in course of time to a League of Nations which should be the definite goal or end to have in view. In conclusion he felt what a power for good this united service might be and hoped the next would be a thanksgiving for peace. The choir was strengthened by the addition of several Nonconformist members. The National Anthem brought to a conclusion a very remarkable service.

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