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Joseph William LUMB

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Surname: LUMB

Forename(s): Joseph William

Place of Birth: Harrogate, Yorkshire

Service No: ---

Rank: 2nd Lieutenant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 'D' Coy 1/4th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 34

Date of Death: 1918-10-30

Awards: M.C.

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: XLVIII. C. 9.

CWGC Cemetery: ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON – ERMYSTED’S GRAMMAR SCHOOL, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Joseph William Lumb was the son of Sam and Sarah Ellen Lumb, née Bancroft. Sam was born at Halifax and Sarah at Cross Roads, near Keighley, Yorkshire.

1891 Ingleton, Yorkshire Census: High Street - Joseph W. Lumb, aged 6 years, born Harrogate, Yorkshire son of Sam and Sarah E. Lumb.

1901 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: Police Station, Otley Road - Joseph Wm Lumb, aged 16 years, born Harrogate, Yorkshire, son of Sam and Sarah Ellen Lumb.

1911 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 33, Gargrave Road - Joseph William Lumb, aged 26 years, born Harrogate, Yorkshire.

Joseph was married to Alice Hartley in 1911.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Joseph William Lumb M.C., 10372, Inns of Court O.T.C. & 2nd Lt 4th West Riding Regiment. Correspondence: (Widow) Mrs. J.W. Lumb, 52, Churchfield Terrace, Skipton-in-Craven, Yorks.

A short biography of Joseph is included in: ‘A Grammar School at War - The Story of Ermysted’s Grammar School during the Great War’ by Steven Howarth (2007).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

LUMB, Lieut. J.W., aged 34, West Riding Regiment, son of late ex-Sergeant S. Lumb and Mrs. Lumb, North View, Gargrave Road, Skipton, died of wounds Oct. 31, 1918.

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2nd Lieutenant Joseph William LUMB

2nd Lieutenant Joseph William LUMB

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: LUMB

Forename(s): Joseph William

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: 2/Lt

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 4th Battalion (Territorial)

Decorations: M.C.

Died Date: 30/10/18

Died How: Died of wounds

Theatre of War:

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: LUMB

Forename(s): Joseph William

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Second Lieutenant

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 1st/4th Bn.

Age: 34

Awards: M C

Died Date: 30/10/1918

Additional Information: Son of Sam and Sarah Ellen Lumb, of Skipton; husband of Alice Lumb, of Skipton, Yorks. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: LOVED, HONOURED & ALWAYS REMEMBERED)

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THE HISTORY OF THE 1/4TH BATTALION DUKE OF WELLINGTON’S (WEST RIDING) REGIMENT, 1914 – 1919, by Capt. P.G. Bales, M.C. (Edward Mortimer Ltd. 1920)

WINTER ON THE PASSCHENDAELE RIDGE

MOLENAARELSTHOEK & KEERSELAARHOEK

[….] The nights were so bright, and movement over the snow visible at so great a distance, that special white overalls were worn by men patrolling. Unfortunately, no change was made in the colour of the equipment which had to be worn over them. The result was that, though the men of a patrol were practically invisible at no great distance, sets of equipment could be seen moving about in No Man’s Land. There was much patrol activity on both sides, rendered necessary by the hard frost which had made No Man’s Land easily passable. There is no doubt that the enemy was as anxious to secure identification as the British were. So patrols, both defensive and offensive, were out practically the whole of every night. On the night of December 23rd/24th [1917] Sec.-Lieut. J.W. Lumb, while reconnoitring in the neighbourhood of Flinte Farm, narrowly escaped being surrounded by a large enemy patrol. After that, nothing was seen of the enemy in No man’s Land for several nights…

THE LAST STAGE

OCTOBER 11TH AND AFTER

[….] That night [18th October 1918] the Battalion was relieved by the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regt. (4th Division), and withdrew to billets at Naves. The relief was not carried out without loss. One party of D Company, whilst on its way out of the line, was caught by enemy gas shelling. Both Sec.-Lieut. J.W. Lumb and Sec.-Lieut. A.H.W. Mallalieu were hit by fragments, the former so badly that he died in hospital about ten days later, while the latter lost a leg…

APPENDIX II

NOMINAL ROLL OF OFFICERS WHO SERVED WITH THE BATTALION ABROAD

LUMB, J.W., Sec.-Lieut. Joined, 2.11.1917. Wounded near Bailleul, 14.04.1918. Rejoined, 27.04.1918. Wounded near Villers-en-Cauchies, 18.10.1918. Died of wounds, 30.10.1918.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1919

LUMB Joseph William of 52 Churchfield-terrace Skipton Yorkshire 2nd-lieutenant West Riding regiment died 30 October 1918 in France Probate London 11 February to Alice Lumb widow. Effects £1472 1s. 7d.

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Joseph William Lumb

Joseph William Lumb

Courtesy of Ermysted’s Grammar School Archive

Etaples Military Cemetery

Etaples Military Cemetery

CWGC Headstone

Etaples Military Cemetery

Etaples Military Cemetery

CWGC Headstone - personal inscription

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26 April 1918

WOUNDED AND MISSING

Lieut. J. W. Lumb, West Riding Regiment who has been wounded in the left hand and shoulder and is now in one of the base hospitals is the son of Mr. S. Lumb, late Supt. of police at Skipton, and prior to enlisting was in practice as a solicitor at Barnoldswick. He joined the Officers Training Corps and obtained a commission last August, going out to France the following October. His wife resides at 52 Churchfield Terrace, Skipton.

01 November 1918

SKIPTON OFFICER SERIOUSLY WOUNDED

Lieutenant J. W. Lumb, West Riding Regiment, only son of Mr. and Mrs. S. Lumb, Gargrave Road, Skipton, has been admitted to hospital in France in a dangerous condition suffering front shrapnel wounds. As a result of a telegram received from the hospital, his wife, who resides in Keighley Road, Skipton, has left for France. Lieut. Lumb was formerly in practice as a solicitor at Barnoldswick.

08 November 1918

MORE SKIPTON CASUALTIES – Lieutenant J. W. Lumb, West Ridings

The sad news of the death of Lieutenant J. W. Lumb from wounds reached Skipton last Friday morning about the time that it became known that his father, Mr. Sam Lumb, ex-Superintendent of the East Staincliffe Petty Sessional Division, had also passed away, and much sympathy was expressed with the two bereaved families. As stated in our last week’s issue, Lieut. Lumb was wounded during the recent advance on the Western Front in such a manner that little hope was held out for his recovery from the first, and when his wife reached France (in response to a telegram) death had already taken place on October 30th. Mrs. Lumb was able to attend the funeral on the following day. We learn that on October 18th Lieutenant Lumb, with five other officers, was leaving the line when a shell came over, killing one of the officers and wounding the others.

After the usual training in the Officer’s Training Corps, deceased, who was 34 years of age, obtained a commission in August 1917, and went to France the following October, and was attached to the West Riding Regiment. He was wounded in the left hand and shoulder during the early part of last summer, but was able to return to the Front after treatment in a base hospital. He had been recommended for the M.C. Lieut. Lumb was educated at Skipton Grammar School, and for many years was in the office of Messrs. Charlesworth and Wood, solicitors, Skipton, and frequently acted as deputy coroner for the Craven district. Later he was in practice as a solicitor at Barnoldswick. His wife (the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Hartley, Churchfield Terrace, Skipton) and child reside at Churchfield Terrace, Skipton.

15 November 1918

BARNOLDSWICK – The Late Lieutenant J. W. Lumb

The news of Lieutenant Lumb’s untimely death occasioned universal regret at Barnoldswick, where his professional ability, no less than his unfailing courtesy and urbanity, had won him a host of friends, to which testimony is borne in the following letter of condolence, addressed to Mrs. Lumb by Mr. H. Green, secretary of the Barnoldswick Tradesmen’s Association, to which the deceased gentlemen acted in the capacity of legal adviser:– “We desire to convey to you our most sincere sympathy in the heavy loss you have sustained by the death of your husband. It is a loss, which as an Association, we share, for apart from your husband’s relation with it as our legal adviser we had come to regard him as a friend. His genial manner and his sterling character, as well as his professional ability, gave him a high place in our regard, and the news of his death has brought to us feelings of profound regret. We trust you may be sustained in your hour of sorrow, and may find at least some measure of comfort in the thought that he had deservedly won for himself so high a place in the esteem of those who count it a privilege to have known him.”

22 November 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR – The Late Lieutenant Lumb

Mrs. Lumb, widow of Lieutenant J. W. Lumb, of Skipton and Barnoldswick, has received a letter from the Lieutenant-Colonel 1/4th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, sympathising with her in the death of her husband from wounds received in action, and describing him as “a gallant British officer and an English gentleman. The Battalion had very hard fighting for eight days and throughout that period your husband showed great powers of leadership and did many gallant actions. I thought so much of his noble actions that I recommended him for the Military Cross. Whether it will be granted I am not in a position to say, but I hope so.”

21 February 1919

THE LATE SECOND LIEUTENANT J. W. LUMB, SKIPTON – POSTHUMOUS AWARD OF THE M.C.

The late Second Lieutenant J. W. Lumb, West Riding Regiment, son of the late Supt. Lumb of Skipton, and whose widow resides in Churchfield Terrace, Skipton, has been awarded the Military Cross. The deed for which the award is made is officially described as follows:– “For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during an attack near Iwuy on the 11th October. This gallant officer led his platoon with great skill. Early in the attack his platoon was held up by hostile machine gun fire which caused heavy casualties, and it was owing to this officer’s calmness and powers of leadership which kept his platoon together. After working round one flank of the enemy post the platoon managed to continue the advance and eventually captured the whole garrison.”

On October 15th, the day after his birthday, Second Lieutenant Lumb was recommended for the above distinction, but unfortunately he did not live to receive the medal, being mortally wounded three days later. He was buried at Étaples on November 1st.

In a letter to the widow Lieut-Colonel Mowatt says:– “I can assure you that it gives me very great pleasure to inform you that your late and very gallant husband was officially awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in action during the battle of Telle [Selle] River on October 11th and following days. It is too sad for yourself to think that he did not live to wear the well-earned medal, but on behalf of the officers and men of the battalion I should like to congratulate you on your husband’s gallant conduct. I hope the knowledge of your husband doing such good work will help you to bear the great loss.”

04 July 1919

PEACE SUPPLEMENT TO THE 'CRAVEN HERALD' – CRAVEN'S FALLEN OFFICERS

LIEUTENANT J. W. LUMB

West Riding Regiment, of Skipton, formerly in practice as a solicitor at Barnoldswick, died in France October 30th, 1918, from wounds, aged 34 years.

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26 April 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Lieut. J. W. Lumb Wounded

Lieutenant J.W. Lumb, of the West Riding Regiment, whose wife resides at 52, Churchfield Terrace, Skipton, is in hospital at the Base, suffering from gun shot wounds to the left hand and shoulder. Lieut. Lumb, who is a son of Mr. S. Lumb, late Supt. of Police at Skipton, joined the Officer Training Corps and obtained a commission last August, going out to France the following October. He is 33 years of age, and prior to joining the colours was in practice as a solicitor at Barnoldswick.

01 November 1918

Skipton Officer Dangerously Wounded

Lieut. J.W. Lumb, West Riding Regiment, only son of Mr. and Mrs. S. Lumb, Gargrave Road, Skipton, has been admitted to hospital in France in a dangerous condition suffering from shrapnel wounds. As the result of a telegram received from the hospital, his wife, who resides in Keighley Road, Skipton, has left for France. Lieut. Lumb was formerly in practice as a solicitor at Barnoldswick.

08 November 1918

FATHER AND SON

Death of Ex-Supt. S. Lumb, of Skipton
Lieut. J.W. Lumb Dies of Wounds

The death took place on Friday, at his residence, North View, Gargrave Road, Skipton, of Mr. Sam Lumb, formerly superintendent of Police at Skipton, and official news was also received on the same day of the death in France from wounds of his only son, Lieut. J.W. Lumb of the West Riding Regiment. Mr. Lumb (senior) who was 73 years of age, was a native of Huddersfield. He joined the West Riding Constabulary in the year 1866. He was first stationed at Knaresborough. After holding appointment at various places, including Harrogate and Ingleton, he succeeded Supt. B. Crawshaw in September, 1892, as head of the police in the Skipton Division, and retired on pension in 1909. Since 1913 he has represented the North Ward on the Skipton Board of Guardians, on which body he proved a very useful member. He was well-known and highly respected. The funeral took place at Keighley on Tuesday.

The service at the house was conducted by Ven. Archdeacon Cook, and the cortege through the town was headed by a posse of police in charge of Supt. Vaughan. The Skipton Board of Guardians was represented by Mr. G. Bottomley (Farnhill), Mr. F. Metcalfe. Mr. M.R. Knowles (clerk). Mr. J. Slater (workhouse master), and. Mr. J.W. Green (relieving officer); and the Skipton Bench of Magistrates by Mr. Arthur Dewhurst, Mr. R.G. Rankin, Mr. Edgar Wood (clerk), and Mr. J.W. Whittingham (assistant clerk). There were also present Mr. J.E. Newell (deputy coroner) and Mr. George Aldersley. At Keighley the funeral was attended by Supt. Slack, Mr. J. Sunderland (Nelson), Mr. C.H. Foulds. and a posse of police headed by Inspector Steel.

MAGISTERIAL REFERENCES

Before the commencement of the ordinary business at the Skipton Police Court on Saturday, the Chairman (Lieut.-Col. Tottie), on behalf of the Bench, expressed regret at the death of Mr. Sam Lumb, formerly superintendent of police at Skipton, who since his retirement of that position had been a most useful member of the Skipton Board of Guardians. He met him not long ago, but did not then appreciate the fact that he was seriously ill. The magistrates also deeply regretted the death from wounds of Mr. Lumb’s only son. Lieut. W. Lumb, and wished to convey their sympathy with the family.

GUARDIANS' TRIBUTE

At a meeting of the Skipton Board of Guardians on Saturday the Chairman (Mr. J.A. Slingsby), in moving a vote of condolence with the families of the late Mr. Sam Lumb and Lieut. J.W. Lumb, said the Board had had many of these painful duties to perform of late; but he never remembered having to propose a resolution of sympathy in regard to both father and son at the same time. They all knew the late Mr. Lumb as one who knew his duty and did it, and as one whose example in this respect they might well follow. As a Guardian, Mr. Lumb had shown great interest in the work and kindness for the poor; and they all knew how he hated anything that was not straight. Altogether Mr. Lumb had done his duty in a way that should be an example to others. Lieut. Lumb was a fine young fellow who had left behind wife and child to serve his country, and in performing that duty he had given his life, and they had all the greatest sympathy for the bereaved families.

Mr. J. Emmott seconded, and the resolution was carried in silence.

LIEUT. J.W. LUMB

Lieut. J.W. Lumb, West Riding Regiment, husband of Mrs. Lumb, of Churchfield Terrace , Skipton and son of the late ex-Supt. S. Lumb, and Mrs. Lumb, of North View, Gargrave Road, Skipton, died in hospital in France on Wednesday of last week. On Oct. 18th Lieut. Lumb was coming out of the line with a party of five officers when they were caught by a shell, with the result that one of the officers was killed and the other four were wounded. Lieut. Lumb’s condition was considered serious, and as a result of a telegram received from the hospital, his wife left for France last week. On her arrival her husband had passed away, but she was present at the funeral, which took place at Etaples on the day following has death. Lieut. Lumb, who was 34 years of age, enlisted in January, 1917, and went out to France in October of the same year. He had gone through some very heavy fighting, and had twice previously been wounded. He was educated at the Skipton Grammar School. Prior to enlisting he was a solicitor practising on his own account at Barnoldswick, and was formerly deputy coroner for the Craven district. He leaves a widow and one child.

15 November 1918

Barnoldswick Casualties

LIEUT. J.W. LUMB

The news of Lieut. Lumb’s untimely death occasioned universal regret at Barnoldswick, where his professional ability no less than his unfailing courtesy and urbanity had won him a host of friends, to which testimony is borne in the following letter of condolence addressed to Mrs. Lumb by Mr. H. Green, secretary of the Barnoldswick Tradesmen’s Association, to which the deceased gentleman acted in the capacity of legal adviser:– “We desire to convey to you our most sincere sympathy in the heavy loss you have sustained by the death of your husband. It is a loss which as an association we share, for apart from your husband’s relation with us as our legal adviser we had come to regard him as a friend. His genial manner and his sterling character, as well as his professional ability, gave him a high place in our regard, and the news of his death has brought to us feeling of profound regret. We trust you may be sustained in your hour of sorrow and may find at least some measure of comfort in the thought that he had deservedly won for himself so high place in the esteem of those who count it a privilege to have known him.”

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