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Owen McDERMOTT

Main CPGW Record

Surname: McDERMOTT

Forename(s): Owen

Place of Birth: Skipton, Yorkshire

Service No: 265661

Rank: Company Sergeant-Major

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 27

Date of Death: 1918-10-11

Awards: D.C.M., Croix de Guerre (Belgium)

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: I. F. 7.

CWGC Cemetery: WELLINGTON CEMETERY, RIEUX-EN-CAMBRESIS

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Owen McDermott was the son of James Owen and Mary McDermott, née McDonald. James was born in Co. Mayo, Ireland and Mary at Skipton, Yorkshire.

1891 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 12, Union Square - Owen McDermot, aged 6 months, born Skipton, son of Owen and Mary McDermot.

1901 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 3, Chancery Lane - Owen McDermott, aged 10 years, born Skipton, son of Owen and Mary McDermott.

1911 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 14, Hill Street - Owen McDermott, aged 20 years, born Skipton. [Owen was boarding with his sister Mary and brother-in-law William Bell.]

The British Army Service Record for Owen McDermott exists but may be incomplete.

Owen is listed in the Nominal Roll of the 1/6th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment): L/Cpl O. McDermott.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Owen McDermott, 2644, W. Rid. R.; W.O. Cl. 2, 265661, W. Rid. R. Theatre of War first served in: (1) France. Date of entry therein: 14.4.15. K. in A. 11.10.18.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: W.O. Cl. 2, Owen McDermott, 265661, 1/6 W. Rid. R. K. in A. 11.10.18.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: C.S.M. Owen McDermott, 265661, 6 Bn W. Riding. Date and Place of Death: 11.10.18. France. To whom Authorised/Amount Authorised: Sister administratrix - Mary Bell. £69 12s. 8d.

See also: ‘Guiseley Terriers: A Small Part in The Great War - A History of the 1/6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment’ by Stephen Barber (2018).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

McDERMOTT, Company Sergeant Major Owen, aged 29, 16, Hill Street, Skipton, killed in action Oct. 11, 1918.

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Company Sergeant-Major Owen McDERMOTT

Company Sergeant-Major Owen McDERMOTT

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: McDERMOTT

Forename(s): Owen

Born: Skipton, Yorks

Residence:

Enlisted: Skipton

Number: 265661

Rank: C.S.M.

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 1/6th Battalion

Decorations: D.C.M.

Died Date: 11/10/18

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: McDERMOTT

Forename(s): Owen

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 265661

Rank: Company Sergeant Major

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 1st/6th Bn.

Age: 27

Awards: D C M, Croix de Guerre (Belgium)

Died Date: 11/10/1918

Additional Information: Son of James Owen McDermott and Mary McDermott, of Skipton, Yorks. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: LEST WE FORGET FROM LOVING BROTHER & SISTERS)

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Citations of the Distinguished Conduct Medal, 1914-1920

265661 C./S./M. O. McDermott, 1/6th Bn. W. Rid. R., T.F. (Skipton) (LG 3 Sept. 1919).

For marked gallantry and devotion to duty during the period 25th February to 16th September, 1918, especially between 10th and 21st April, when the battalion was fighting near Nieppe and Bailleul. He displayed good leadership, and showed great initiative in taking out a patrol immediately after an attack had been repulsed, capturing several prisoners and two light machine guns. He has done consistent good work since 1915.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1919

MCDERMOTT Owen of 14 Hill-street Bunkers Hill Skipton Yorkshire company-sergeant-major West Riding regiment died 11 October 1918 in France Administration Wakefield 24 April to Mary Bell (wife of William John Bell). Effects £214 14s.

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21 July 1916

NEWS FROM SKIPTON SOLDIERS

We have received a letter from Sergt. C. Thompson, of the 6th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, 49th West Riding Division, who encloses a photograph of sergeants in the A (Skipton) Company, which we regret that we cannot reproduce with any satisfaction owing to technical difficulties. Sergt. Thompson, writing on July 14th, says:– “I take the pleasure of writing a few lines to let you know that the boys and myself are in the pink. We had a good number of casualties while in the trenches, but those of us who are left are in the best of health and spirits. We have had a bit of trouble with the Bosch, but have come out top dog.

"I had the pleasure of reading the ‘Craven Herald’ last week, and it seemed like old times again to see the old familiar names and places talked about. It is a treat to get hold of the paper. Wishing your paper the best of luck, I remain,” &c.

The names of those in the photograph are:– Sergeant Pryke, Sergeant Ireland, Sergeant Hawley, Company Q.M.S. Cumberland, Sergeant (ex-P.C.) Thompson, Sergeant Fennerty, Sergeant McDermott, Sergeant Cutler, and Lance-Sergeant Carruthers.

28 June 1918

POSTHUMOUS HONOUR FOR SERGEANT GIBSON, SKIPTON

Mrs. Gibson, of 28 Brook Street, Skipton, whose husband, Sergeant Walter Gibson, was killed on April 30th, has received a letter intimating that the coveted honour of the D.C.M. has been bestowed on deceased. Twenty-eight years of age, Sergeant Gibson was mobilised with the local Territorials at the outbreak of war. His time expired in September last, but he returned to the Front after a short leave at home. He was formerly in the employ of Mr. G. E. Carr, provision merchant, Skipton, and was one of four brothers serving.

In a letter to Mrs. Gibson, C.S.M. McDermott of the ‘Duke’s’ expresses the hope that she will long be spared to treasure the honour won by her husband, and adds:– “He was one of the best N.C.O.s in our Company, and I can assure you that his place will be very hard to fill. We are deeply touched to think that he is not with us to receive the decoration. However, we feel highly proud to know that you will be in possession of such an honourable memento of your husband having died for his King and Country.”

18 October 1918

Two Skipton N.C.O.’s Fall Together

The sad news reached Skipton on Wednesday that two well-known N.C.O.’s of the local Territorials, Company-Sergeant Major Owen McDermott, and Sergeant G. E.. Godwin, M.M., had fallen together in action on October 11th.

The news come in a letter received by Mrs. Pass, of Newmarket Street (Sergeant Godwin’s sister), from her husband, Company Quarter-Master Sergeant Pass, who stated that he had just brought in the body of his brother-in-law from the battlefield, and that the two brave soldiers had fallen together and had been buried together in a nice little village. He added, “They died doing their duty: they have done it well.” Sergeant Godwin, who not long ago was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field, was 29 years of age, and his home was at 16 Hill Street, Skipton. He formerly worked for the Leeds and Liverpool Canal Co. Mobilised with the Territorials, his period of service expired whilst he was abroad, but after a leave he rejoined and had been back at the Front about two years.

25 October 1918

A Gallant Skipton N.C.O.

We are able to reproduce a photograph of Company-Sergeant-Major Owen McDermott, West Riding Regiment, of Skipton, whose death in action by the side of Sergeant Godwin of Skipton was referred to in a letter from the Front published in the ‘Herald’ last week. Deceased was 29 years of age and lived with his sister, Mrs. Bell, at 14 Hill Street, Skipton, being employed prior to the war as a labourer at Belle Vue Mills. As a Territorial he was mobilised when the great struggle commenced, and he had been on active service since April 1915. He had gone through many tough fights without a scratch until he was fatally shot on October 11th, and had been awarded the French Croix de Guerre for gallantry in the field.

08 November 1918

MORE SKIPTON CASUALTIES – THE LATE COMPANY SERGEANT-MAJOR OWEN McDERMOTT: Belgian Croix de Guerre Winner

Further particulars have been received by Mrs. Bell, of 14 Hill Street, Skipton, respecting the death in action on October 11th last on the Western Front of her brother, Company Sergt.-Major Owen McDermott, of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, formerly attached to the Skipton Volunteers, whose sad end was notified in our columns a few weeks ago. The deceased officer joined up at the outbreak of war, and had never had a scratch up to the time when he was fatally injured. In February 1918 he received the Belgian Croix de Guerre for what his superior officer described as “a just acknowledgement of your splendid services. You have put a new feather in the Corps. Cap.”

The following letter has been received by Mrs. Bell:– “While our battalion was advancing the enemy fired a machine gun, and his death was caused by a bullet. It must be some consolation to you to know that his death was instantaneous; therefore he suffered no pain whatever. I shall miss him very much as we had lived together for more than 12 months. Your brother was very fearless and much respected by the officers and N.C.O.s and men in his company. He has died a noble death. I expect you have heard of the death of Sergeant Godwin. He and your brother were great friends. They died a few yards from each other. They are laid to rest side by side, and two beautiful crosses mark their grave. Please accept my deepest sympathy. Signed: Eli Barraclough, clerk; E.W. Birchenough, C.Q.M.S.; S. Patchett, Sergeant; E. Fawcett (the deceased’s servant); E.B. Smith, cook; W. Pass, C.Q.M.S.; Jas. Norton, R.Q.M.S.”

The deceased’s brother-in-law, Private W. Bell, is serving in Salonika, and a letter from him a few days ago stated that he was well.

10 October 1919

McDERMOTT – In loving memory of our dear brother, Company-Sergeant-Major O. McDermott, D.C.M., Belgium Croix de Guerre, 1/6th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, killed in action October 11th, 1918.

May the Heavenly winds blow softly
O’er that sweet and hallowed spot,
Though the sea divides your grave from us
You will never be forgot.
Now you are sleeping your last long sleep
In a grave we may never see;
But some gentle hand in that distant land
May scatter some flowers for me.

From his loving brother and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Cordingley, 36 Rectory Row, Keighley.

McDERMOTT – In loving memory of our dear brother, Company-Sergeant-Major O. McDermott, 1/6th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, D.C.M., Belgian Croix de Guerre, killed in action October 11th, 1918.

Dear brother of ours, you sleep with the brave,
Your life for your country you nobly gave;
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.

R. I. P.

From his loving Brother and Sister, Mr. and Mrs. Bell, 111 High Street, Skipton.

21 May 1920

Deceased Skipton Soldier’s War Medals

Mr. T. McDermott, a Skiptonian, now residing at Mount Bridge Villa, Boston, Lincolns., writes informing us he has received from the War Office two medals awarded to his brother, C.S.M. Owen McDermott, who was killed in France on October 11th, 1918. The medals are for Distinguished Conduct, and the Belgian Croix de Guerre. The deceased soldier belonged to the Duke of Wellington’s Regt., and was well-known in Skipton.

08 October 1920

McDERMOTT – In loving memory of Company-Sergeant-Major Owen McDermott, D.C.M., 1/6th Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, killed in action October 11th, 1918.

Two sad and lonely years have passed
Since our great sorrow fell;
And we who are left still mourn for him,
The one we loved so well.
But God is good,
He gives us strength to bear our heavy cross,
He is the only one who knows our bitter loss.

Sadly missed by his loving Brother and Sister-in-law, two Nephews – Roby and Owen, Mount Bridge Villas, Boston.

McDERMOTT – In loving memory of our dear brother C.M.S. Owen McDermott, killed in action October 11th, 1917.

Time passes, shadows fall,
But true remembrance outlasts all.

From loving Sister and Brother, 14 Hill Street, Skipton.

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28 June 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Honour for a Skipton Hero

Mrs. Gibson, of 28, Brook Street, Skipton, wife of Sergt. Walter Gibson, of the West Riding Regiment, who was killed in action on April 30th, has received the following letter from Company-Sergt.-Major O. McDermott:– “It is with great pleasure that I write to let you know that I have just heard that your husband has won the D.C.M., which is undoubtedly, a great honour – one which I hope you will live to treasure. I can fully realise what a great blow it would be to you, as it was to all of us, on hearing of his death. He was one of the best N.C.O.’s in our company, and I can assure you that his place will be very hard to fill. We feel very deeply touched to think that he is not with us to receive the decoration. However, we feel highly proud to know that you will be in possession of such an honourable memento of your husband having died for his King and country.” Sergt. Gibson, who was 27 years of age, mobilised with the Territorials at the outbreak of war. He was formerly employed by Mr. G.E. Carr, grocer and provision merchant, Skipton.

18 October 1918

Skipton Sergeant Killed

Sergt. G.E. Godwin, whose home is at 16, Hill Street, Skipton, and brother of Mrs. Pass, of Newmarket Street, Skipton, has been killed in action. Mrs. Pass has received a letter from her husband in which he states that he brought Sergt. Godwin off the field of battle and buried him in a nice little village. He adds that Company-Sergt-Major Owen McDermot, another Skipton man, was killed at the same time. Sergt. Godwin, who was 29 years of age, was called up with the Territorials. His time expired, but he rejoined the Army and had been at the front two years. He was formerly employed by the Canal Company.

25 October 1918

McDERMOT – Killed in action Oct. 11th, Company Sergt.-Major Owen McDermot, West Riding Regiment, brother of Mrs. Bell, 14, Hill St., Skipton, aged 27.

R.I.P.

25 October 1918

Company Sergt. Major O. McDermot Killed

Company Sergt.-Major Owen McDermot, of the West Riding Regiment, brother of Mrs. Bell, of 14, Hill Street, Skipton, was killed in action on Oct. 11th. Company-Sergeant-Major McDermot, who was 27 years of age, was an old Territorial. He was mobilised at the outbreak of the war, and went out to France in April, 1915. He had been awarded the Croix de Guerre for gallantry and dedication to duty. He had gone through some very severe fighting, and prior to his death had not received a scratch. He was formerly employed as a labourer at Belle Vue Mills, Skipton.

08 November 1918

Tribute to a Skipton Hero

Mrs. Bell, 14, Mill Street, Skipton, has received the following letter from Pte. Eli Barraclough, of the West Riding Regiment, in which he gives particulars of how her brother, Quartermaster-Sergt. Owen McDermott, of Skipton, met his death:– “While our battalion was advancing the enemy fired a machine gun and his death was caused by a bullet. It may be some consolation to you to know that his death was instantaneous, and therefore suffered no pain. I shall miss him very much, as we had ‘lived’ together for more than 12 months. Your brother was fearless, and much respected by all the officers, N.C.O.’s, and men of his company. He is a honour to his race, and he has died a noble death. I expect you will have heard of the death of Sergt. Godwin – he and your brother were great friends. They died a few yards from each other. They are laid to rest side by side, and two beautiful crosses mark their graves.

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