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Ronald Falshaw MORKILL

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Surname: MORKILL

Forename(s): Ronald Falshaw

Place of Birth: Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland

Service No: ---

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment / Corps / Service: Royal Flying Corps

Battalion / Unit: ---

Division: ---

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1915-06-23

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: East of Church.

CWGC Cemetery: KIRKBY MALHAM (ST. MICHAEL) CHURCHYARD

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: AIRTON, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: KIRKBY MALHAM, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Ronald Falshaw Morkill (born 22 November 1891) was the son of John William and Hannah Shaw Morkill, née Hobson. John was born at Killingbeck and Hannah at Leeds, Yorkshire. John William Morkill wrote the book: 'The Parish of Kirkby Malhamdale' that was originally published in 1933.

1911 Ealing, Middlesex Census: University College Hall, Queens Walk - Ronald Falshaw Morkill, aged 19 years, born Edinburgh, Midlothian. Science Student.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: 2/Lt Ronald F. Morkill, 1st West Yorkshire Regiment attached to 1st East Yorkshire Regimenr & R.F.C. Disembarkation Returns - Roll shows 8 September 1914. Correspondence: J.W. Morkill Esq applies for "1914 Star" in respect of his late son - 12 December 1917. Address: J.W. Morkill Esq (F) Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, Via Leeds. New address: Mrs C. Pryce, 8, Dalmeny Court, Duke St. SW1. & Penn's Rocks, Withyham, Sussex - 2 March 1922.

Ronald was married to Ellen Mary Wilkinson in 1914.

The fathers' of Lieutenant Ronald Falshaw Morkill and Captain Francis Edward Morkill (q.v.) were cousins.

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

MORKILL, Lieut. Ronald Falshaw, Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Morkill, of Newfield Hall, [Bell Busk], died on June 21, 1916 from injuries received in a flying accident. Married a few months before he died.

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Lieutenant Ronald Falshaw MORKILL

Lieutenant Ronald Falshaw MORKILL

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Flying Corps

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Flying Corps

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: MORKILL

Forename(s): Ronald Falshaw

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: Lt

Regiment: Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment)

Battalion: 1st Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 23/06/15

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War:

Notes: Att R.F.C.

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: MORKILL

Forename(s): Ronald Falshaw

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment: Royal Flying Corps and 1st Bn. West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own)

Unit:

Age: 23

Awards:

Died Date: 23/06/1915

Additional Information: Son of John William and Hannah Shaw Morkill, of Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, via Leeds; husband of Ellen Mary Morkill (nee Wilkinson), of Neasham Abbey, near Darlington.

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DE RUVIGNY'S ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-1918 - Part One

MORKILL, RONALD FALSHAW, Lieut., 1st Battn. West Yorkshire Regt. and Flying Officer, Royal Flying Corps; 2nd s. of John William Morkill, of Newfield Hall, Malhamdale, Yorkshire, M.A., J.P., by his wife, Hannah Shaw, yst. dau. of Peter Hobson, of Castle Lodge, Yorkshire, and niece and co-heiress of Sir James Falshaw, Bart.; b. Edinburgh, 22 Nov. 1891; educ. Radley, and University College, London; received a commission as 2nd Lieut. 4th (Special Reserve) Battn. West Yorkshire Regt. 1 Oct. 1911, and was promoted Lieut. 3 Dec. 1912. After the outbreak of war he was (14 Aug. 1914) gazetted to the 1st West Yorkshires and the following day went to the Front as Lieut. attd. to the 1st East Yorkshires, with which he served through the winter of 1914-15. On 1 July 1913, he gained a pilot’s certificate from the Royal Aero Club, and in Feb. 1915, was transferred to the Royal Flying Corps as a probationer. He qualified as a flying officer on 19 June, and was gazetted to the Corps on 15 July, after his death. Under orders on 22 June he piloted a Bleriot Monoplane from Gosport to Shoreham, leaving the latter place on his return journey shortly after 6 o’clock in the evening. He had risen barely 200 feet when his engine was noticed to miss fire and finally stop. Having insufficient space beneath him he was unable to keep control of his craft which dived to the earth causing injuries by the impact from which he died in the Military Hospital a few hours later. A letter of sympathy from the N.C.Os. and men of the section he commanded, dated 3 July, 1915, contains the following passage: “The hardest and most terribly trying time–last winter–he spent in the trenches with us, and never a murmur of complaint was ever heard to fall from his lips. To say he was loved by all men would be to express our feelings in the mildest form.” Buried at Kirby-in Malhamdale, Yorkshire. He m. at Holy Trinity Church, Heywood, Westbury, Wilts, 23 Sept. 1914, Ellen Mary, yst. dau. of the late Thomas Loyzelure Wilkinson, of Neasham Abbey, near Darlington; s.p.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1919

MORKILL Ronald Falshaw of Newfield Hall Bell Bush [sic] Yorkshire lieutenant West Yorkshire regiment attached R.F.C. died 23 June 1915 at Brighton Administration London 31 December to Ellen Mary Pryce (wife of Carylap Rhys Pryce). Effects £120 4s. 8d.

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Ronald Falshaw Morkill

Ronald Falshaw Morkill

Source: Unknown

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

Entry on Page 28

St Michael's Churchyard, Kirkby Malham

St Michael's Churchyard, Kirkby Malham

CWGC private memorial - [Inscription: 'Ronald Falshaw Morkill, Lieut. 1st batt. West Yorkshire Regt/and flying/officer R.F.C., was killed in flight at Shoreham, in Sussex,/22nd June 1915, aged 23.']

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16 October 1914

A Military Wedding

Owing to the war, the marriage took place quietly on September 23rd, by licence, at Holy Trinity Church, Heywood, Wilts., between Ronald Falshaw Morkill, Lieutenant 4th West Yorkshire Regiment, second son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Morkill, of Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, and Ellen Mary, youngest daughter of the late T. L. Wilkinson and Mrs. Wilkinson of Neasham Abbey, Darlington. The Rev. J. G. B. Hollins performed the ceremony. The bridegroom left immediately after the ceremony to rejoin his regiment, and the bride is at present staying with her sister, Mrs. H. Brodick, The Parsonage, Heywood Park, Westbury, Wilts.

25 June 1915

MORKILL – June 22nd, the result of injuries in a flying accident at Gosport, Lieut. Ronald Falshaw Morkill, second son of Mr. and Mrs. Morkill, of Newfield Hall, Bell Busk. Funeral on Saturday, the 26th, at Kirkby Malham, at 2-45 p.m.

25 June 1915

THE LATE LIEUTENANT MORKILL

We are asked to announce that the funeral of the late Lieut. Morkill (whose sad death is reported on page 2) will take place on Saturday at Kirkby Malham at 2-45 p.m.

We understand that Lieutenant Morkill’s machine turned turtle in the air and fell with a crash to the ground. When picked up Lieut. Morkill was alive, and he was conveyed with all possible speed to a military hospital at Brighton, where he died within a few hours of admission.

25 June 1915

CRAVEN AVIATOR'S DEATH – LIEUT. R. F. MORKILL SUCCUMBS TO INJURIES

News was received on Wednesday of the death of Lieutenant Ronald Falshaw Morkill, the second son of Mr. J. W. Morkill, J.P., of Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, who received a telegram from his daughter-in-law stating that her husband died on Tuesday from injuries received in a flying accident at Gosport.

Lieutenant Morkill, who was gazetted to the West Yorkshire Regiment, was, according to the Army List, attached to the East Yorkshire Regiment. Last September he went to the front, and was on active service in Flanders continually up to February last. Then he returned to England, and was transferred to the Flying Corps as a probationer, and qualified only last week. This, however, was not Lieutenant Morkill's first connection with aviation, for two years ago he obtained a certificate as pilot.

Details of the accident, which resulted in the gallant officer's death, are unknown, but his father, who is Chairman of the Leeds West Riding Bench and acting Chairman of the East Staincliffe Magistrates, proceeded south on Wednesday.

To add to the sadness of the tragedy, we may state that Lieut. Morkill was only recently married to the youngest daughter of the late Mr. T. L. Wilkinson, of Neasham Abbey, Darlington.

Mr. and Mrs. Morkill have the deepest sympathy of the whole district in their sad bereavement.

25 June 1915

Craven's Roll of Honour

Week by week the war is being brought forcibly home to the homes of Craven. Several more casualties are reported in our columns this week, and to the bereaved families we offer our deep sympathy. No matter what the social scale may be, the pang is equally keen - whether the fallen one be an officer or a private in the ranks. The second officer connected with the immediate district who has paid the price of patriotism with his life is Lieut. R. F. Morkill, the second son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Morkill, of Newfield Hall, than whom no one have been more active in showing practical sympathy with those affected by the conflict ever since the commencement of hostilities in August last. Lieut. Morkill appears to have succumbed on Tuesday night to injuries received in a flying accident at Gosport. The precise details are not yet to hand, but whatever they be, Lieut. Morkill has just as truly given his promising young life to his country in her hour of need as if he had died leading his men against the foe, or in the thick of the fight. Heartfelt sympathy will go out to Mr. and Mrs. Morkill in their sad loss.

02 July 1915

OBITUARY – THE LATE LIEUT. MORKILL

News of the death of Lieut. Ronald Falshaw Morkill, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Morkill, of Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, under the sad circumstances recorded in our last issue, was received with general regret throughout Craven, and the bereaved family have been the recipients of many sincere expressions of deep sympathy.

Lieut. Morkill was educated at Radley University College, London. He entered the army through the special Reserve Battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment, commanded by Col. Tottie, and early in October last was gazetted to the 1st Battalion. He was sent immediately to France, and was attached to the 1st East Yorkshire Regiment, which faltered severely in recent engagements. He served with his regiment at the front until February this year, when he came home on leave. Two years ago Lieut. Morkill obtained a pilots certificate at the Eastbourne Flying School, and on leaving the trenches in February he was sent as a probationer to the Royal Flying Corps, based at Shoreham and later at Gosport. Only a week before the accident he passed the examination at the Central Flying School and was about to be gazetted to the Corps.

In September last year Lieut. Morkill married Ellen Mary, youngest daughter of the late Mr. T. L. Wilkinson, of Neasham Abbey, Darlington.

THE INQUEST – Aeroplane's Fatal Dive

The inquest was held on Thursday at the 2nd Eastern General Hospital, Brighton.

Mr. Morkill gave evidence of identification, stating that Lieut. Morkill was 22 years of age. He was at the front all the winter and returned last February suffering from a bad attack of influenza. Subsequently he became attached to the Royal Flying Corps.

Major Waldron, R.F.C., Lieut. Morkill's Commanding Officer, said that the deceased, having practically just finished his probation, was about to be gazetted. He had had a good deal of experience, having made countless flights before, and on Tuesday afternoon the major ordered him to make the flight from Gosport to Shoreham and back.

The same machine as which the deceased flew was flown on Tuesday by Second Lieutenant Cooper, R.F.C., who said it was in perfect order when he handed it over to the deceased.

The accident was described by Major MacLean, R.F.C. He said the deceased was preparing to start from Shoreham on the return and the engine was running satisfactorily, but the Major observed a leak in the oil system, so he stopped him, and after a new pipe had been found he proceeded. The machine got off slightly across the wind, and when up about 200 feet the engine missed once or twice and appeared to stop; this was subsequently ascertained to be due to a mechanical fracture. The pilot turned down the wind to land in the aerodrome, but did so too flatly, which developed into a ‘nose dive,’ in which the aeroplane hit the ground.

The witness added that he had since examined the engine, and ascertained that one of the balance weights of the valves was fractured. That was one of the most probable causes of the engine missing. If the machine had been up three thousand feet, Lieut. Morkill would have had time to right it, but as he was flying low, only two hundred feet up, he had no time.

Lieutenant Hurry, R.A.M.C., said he was present when the deceased was extricated from the wreckage. He did not actually strike the ground himself, but had been crushed by the wreckage of the machine. There was a compound fracture of the left leg, and several ribs were broken. He was instantly placed on a stretcher and conveyed to the hospital.

In returning a verdict of ‘Accidental death’ the jury expressed their keen sympathy with the bereaved relatives. The Coroner (Mr. Benson) joined in the expression. The jury gave their fee towards the Stamp Fund for the Expeditionary Force.

THE INTERMENT

The body was removed from Brighton to Newfield Hall on Friday, and the interment took place the following day at Kirkby Malham Church. Gentle rain fell during the afternoon and a grey mist shut out the beauty of the Dale, thus accentuating the gloom which seemed to overhang the district. Signs of mourning were general. At Airton every blind was drawn and the same token of respect was noticeable at Kirkby Malham, where the arrival of the cortege was awaited by an attendance thoroughly representative of the varied interests with which the deceased officer's family are identified. The coffin, which was covered with the Union Jack, was met at the lych gate by the Ven. Archdeacon Cook, rector of Skipton; the Rev. D. R. Hall, vicar of Kirkby Malham; and the Rev. H. H. Malleson, vicar of Manston.

As the procession entered the church the organist (Mrs. D. B. Hall) played the National Anthem, and the service, impressive in its simplicity, commenced with the singing of the hymn ‘Fight the good fight.’ The choir chanted the 90th psalm with befitting solemnity, and this was followed by the first portion of the burial service read by Archdeacon Cook. ‘Brief life is here our portion’ was the concluding hymn, and to the strains of Handel’s Largo the coffin was wheeled from the foot of the chancel steps to its last resting place beneath the shadow of an ancient edifice. The last sad rites were performed by the Vicar of the Parish and the Rev. H. H. Malleson.

The mourners were: Mr. and Mrs. J. W Morkill, Mr. Hugh Morkill (brother), and Lieut. Geoffrey Wilkinson, East Riding Yeomanry (brother-in-law). The widow of the deceased officer was suffering too severely from shock to travel from Brighton, and his sister, Miss Morkill, remained with her. Lieut. Morkill's elder brother, Mr. Alan Morkill, is abroad in the Malay Civil Service.

Among those present were Mrs. Dudley Illingworth (Hanlith Hall), Miss Garnett Orme (Scosthrop), Mrs. C. H. Rickards (Kirk Syke), Mrs. White (Calton), Mr. W. Morrison, Mr. Wm. Clough, M.P., Col. R. F. Roundell, Mr. J, A. Slingsby (chairman of the Skipton Board of Guardians and the Rural District Council), Mr. R. B. Barrett (Skipton Castle), Mr. J. Mason (Thorleby House), Dr. G. E. Fisher (Skipton), Dr Robertson (Airton), Mr. J. Winskill (chairman of the Settle Board of Guardians), the Rev. C. J. Robinson (vicar of Coniston Cold), Mr. F. Skirrow (Malham Tarn), Mr. R. Brown, Mr. J. Walker, Mr. C. Metcalfe, Mr. W H. Ingleby, Mr. T. Foster, Mr. R. Foster, Mr. J. Bolland, Mr. P. Wigglesworth, Mr. L. Gifford, Mr. Thos. Dinsdale, Mr. R. Richardson, Mr. E. Richardson, Mr. W A. Proctor (Kirkby Malham), Mr. W. Carlisle, Mr. A. Broadbent (Skipton), Mr. Hoggarth (Bell Busk), Mr. T. W. Parker, and Mr. T. Emmott.

The East and West Staincliffe Constabulary were represented by a sergeant and two constables from each division.

Col. J. B. O. Tottie, of Conistone Hall (who is with his regiment on service), sent his private carriage.
Floral tributes were sent by the widow, father and mother, sister and brothers, sisters and brothers-in-law, Mr. John Falshaw Robson, and Mr. Geo. Andrew Hobson (uncles), Lieut. Col. Ashmore, M.V.O. and the officers of the 6th wing of the Royal Flying Corps; Major Waldron and the officers of No. 17 Squadron Royal Flying Corps; Lady Wilson, Col. R. F. and Mrs. Roundell, Mrs, John Yorke, Col and Misses Tottie, Mr., Mrs, and Miss Barrett, Miss E. Garnett Orme, Mr. Beresford-Pierse, the Rev, D. R. and Mrs. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Foster (Newfield Grange), Mr. and Mrs. Dinsdale (two of the indoor and outdoor servants at the Hall), Mr. and Mrs. Perrett (Bell Busk), and the Malhamdale Agricultural and Horticultural Association.

MAGISTERIAL SYMPATHY

Before the commencement of the ordinary business at the Skipton Petty Sessions on Saturday, sympathy was expressed with the relatives of the late Lieut. R. F. Morkill.

Sir J. C. Horsfall, who presided, said a sad duty fell to his lot in moving that the Bench forward a vote of condolence to the parents and widow of Lieut. Morkill. Their colleague and chairman has lost a son – a brave young man, amongst a great number who were doing all they possibly could and making every sacrifice on behalf of their King and Country. The accident was perhaps all more melancholy being as an aviator, Lieut. Morkill lost his life from an accident, and the speaker felt sure they would express their deepest sympathy with the relatives in their great sorrow which had come to them.

Mr. J. A. Slingsby seconded the proposition and said Mr. Morkill was a friend to all of them and made a splendid chairman. He possessed a very tender heart, and the members of the Bench felt what a shock had come to him. Mr. Slingsby felt sure that the family would have their deep sympathy.

REFERENCE BY THE BISHOP OF RIPON

The Bishop of Ripon, speaking on Monday at the opening of the first of a series of soldiers institutes which are being erected at the Ripon camp under the auspices of the Diocesan Board for the spiritual welfare of the troops - of which Mr. J. W. Morkill is treasurer - made a pathetic reference to the death of Lieut. Morkill. He expressed regret at the absence of Mr. Morkill, the treasurer of the fund, who had bestowed a large amount of time on the work. His absence was caused by the very sad event of the death of his son, who belonged to the Flying Corps. He was quite sure they would join with him in expressing his sympathy with Mr. Morkill and his family in their loss.

By a curious coincidence the Institute held on Monday was presented by Mr. and Mrs. North, the Close, Knaresborough, in memory of their son, Lieut. Kenneth Croft North, of the 4th Hussars, who was killed whilst in command of a machine gun section of his regiment on the 31st.

23 July 1915

THE LATE LIEUTENANT MORKILL

The following is an extract from the London Gazette of July 14th:– “Royal Flying Corps., Mil. Wing. Flying Officer-Lieut. R. F. Morkill, W. Yorks. (Since killed on duty) July 21.”

04 July 1919

PEACE SUPPLEMENT TO THE 'CRAVEN HERALD' – CRAVEN'S FALLEN OFFICERS

LIEUTENANT R. F. MORKILL

1st Battalion East Yorks. Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Morkill, Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, accidentally killed whilst flying at Gosport, 22nd June, 1915.

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25 June 1915

DEATH OF LIEUT. R.F. MORKILL

Lieut. Ronald Falshaw Morkill, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Morkill of Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, is reported to have died on Tuesday near Gosport, as the result of injuries received in an accident whilst flying. Lieut. Morkill, who has not been married many months, was with a Yorkshire Regiment in France from September to February, when he returned to England and was attached to the Flying Corps. Much sympathy will be extended to Mr. and Mrs. Morkill and the widow in their great loss.

The funeral will take place at 2.45 tomorrow (Saturday) at Kirkby Malham, Churchyard.

02 July 1915

FUNERAL OF LIEUT. MORKILL – Simple Scene at Kirkby Malham

In the quiet, old-world churchyard at Kirkby Malham on Saturday, the remains of the late Lieut. Ronald Falshaw Morkill of the Royal Flying Corps (whose death through a flying accident we reported in our last issue) were laid to rest. The atmospherical conditions were in keeping with the overwhelming sorrow of the occasion, dark and lowering clouds breaking into a continuous weeping rainfall.

The pathetic and patriotic associations of the late unfortunate young officer’s death naturally evoked a wider sympathy than would have been obtained in normal circumstances, so that in addition to those who attended the obsequies as a mark of respect for deceased’s parents, there was a considerable following of persons anxious to reveal their sincere sympathy for a gallant gentleman whose life was given in his country’s service. Long before the funeral cortege, escorted on foot by six estate employees, wended its sorrowful way along the winding road leading from Newfield Hall, the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Morkill, the immediate vicinity of the little churchyard was a foregathering place for groups of friends and sympathisers, standing quietly and patiently in the relentless rain. Every male head was uncovered as the coffin, wrapped in a Union Jack and surmounted by several lovely wreaths principally composed of roses, was lifted from the hearse and through the old-fashioned lych-gate, where a wheeled bier was in readiness to convey it along the flagged pathway, overhung by the drooping golden spires of the laburnum trees and amid the scent of hay new mown, to the church where the first part of the service was held.

A large congregation of neighbours and friends had also collected within the sacred building, and was seated in the ancient box-pews which still form the church’s seating accommodation, amongst them being noticed:– Mr. William Clough, M.P., Lieut. Col. R.F. Roundell (Gledstone), Mr. W. Morrison, J.P., Mr. R.B. Barrett, J.P. (Skipton Castle), Mr. J.A. Slingsby J.P. (Carla Beck), Dr. Geo. E . Fisher (Skipton), Dr. Robertson (Airton), Mr. J. Mason (Thorlby House), Mr. W.A. Procter (Holgate House), Miss Garnett-Orme (Scosthrop Hall), Mr. C.H. Rickards (Kirk Syke), the Rev. C.J. Robinson (Coniston Cold and Bell Busk), Mrs. D. Illingworth (Hanlith Hall), Mr. J. Winskill, Mr. J. Walker (Skellands), Mr. R. Brown (Calton Hall), Mr. C. Metcalfe (Scosthrop), Mr. W.H. Ingilby, Mr. J. Hoggarth, Mr. L. Gifford, Mrs. White, Mr. Alex Broadbent (Skipton), Mr. P. Wigglesworth, Mr. T. Smith, Mr. G.W. Parker (Airton), Mr. W. Carlisle, Mr. F. Skirrow, Mr. J. Bolland, Mr. T. Foster, Mr. R. Foster, Mr. C. Richardson, etc. Lieut. Col. Tottie (who is away on military duty) was represented.

The principal mourners were Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Morkill (deceased’s parents), Mr. Hugh Morkill (brother), and Lieut. Geoffrey Wilkinson, East Riding Yeomanry (brother-in-law). The widow of the deceased officer was suffering too severely from shock to travel from Brighton, and deceased’s only sister, Miss Morkill, remained with her. Lieut. Morkill’s elder brother, Mr. Alan Morkill, is abroad in the Malay Civil Service.

The vicar (Rev. D.R. Hall) conducted the service, being assisted by the Archdeacon of Craven (Rev. H. Lucas Cook), and the Rev. H.H. Mallinson (vicar of Manston, where the family formerly resided). As the funeral cortege entered the church the organist (Mrs. Hall, wife of the vicar) softly rendered the National Anthem. The coffin was rested at the chancel steps, and the hymn ‘Fight the good fight’ was sung, the mixed choir leading. The 90th Psalm, ‘Lord, Thou hast been our refuge’ was then chanted, following which Archdeacon Cook very beautifully read the words of the lesson contained in the service, I Corinthians, xv., 20. The first part of the sad ritual closed with the singing of the hymn ‘Brief life is here our portion’ the organist playing Handel’s ‘Largo in G’ as the mourners moved away to the graveside. Here the very simple ceremony ended with the lowering of the coffin, which was of unpolished oak with brass upholstery, into the deep flower and leaf-lined grave at the east end of the fane, and the closing Benediction pronounced by the Archdeacon.

BEAUTIFUL FLORAL TRIBUTES

Floral tributes were sent by the widow, father and mother, sister and brothers, sisters and brothers-in-law, Mr. John Falshaw Hobson and Mr. Geo. Andrew Hobson (uncles), Lieut. Col. Ashmore, M.V.O., and the officers of the 5th Wing of the Royal Flying Corps; Lady Wilson, Col. R.F. and Mrs. Roundell, Mrs. John Yorke, Col. and the Misses Tottie, Mr., Mrs. and Miss Barrett, Miss E. Garnett-Orme, Miss Beresford-Peirse, Archdeacon and Mrs. Cook, Rev. D.R. and Mrs. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Foster (Newfield Grange), Mr. and Mrs. Dinsdale, the indoor and outdoor servants of Newfield Hall, Mr. and Mrs. Perrett (Bell Busk), and Malhamdale Agricultural and Horticultural Association, etc.

SYMPATHY FROM THE SKIPTON BENCH

Before proceeding with the ordinary business at the Skipton Petty Sessions on Saturday, the Chairman of the Bench (Sir John Horsfall, Bart.) said it was his sad duty to state that one of their colleagues, Mr. J.W. Morkill of Newfield Hall, had lost his son. He was one of their brave men, amongst a large number of others all over the country, who were ready to make any sacrifice and do their duty on behalf of the country. As a volunteer he lost his life through an accident, and they all wished to express their deep regret and sincere sympathy with the young widow and Mr. and Mrs. Morkill in the great sorrow which had fallen upon them. He proposed that.

In seconding the proposition, Mr. Slingsby remarked that Mr. Morkill was a friend to them all, and he made a splendid chairman. He had got a tender heart and they all knew what it would be to him. It was a very sad case altogether. He (Mr. Slingsby) was sure that the family had the sympathy of all.

The proposition was carried by everyone silently rising in their places.

02 July 1915

THE INQUEST

An inquest was held at Brighton on Lieut. Morkill, evidence of identification was given by Mr. John W. Morkill, of Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, who said that his son had been at the Front all the winter and came home in February with a bad attack of influenza.

Major Waldron (Royal Flying Corps) spoke of instructing Lieut. Morkill to make a flight from Gosport to Shoreham. He carried this out according to instructions and started to return when the accident happened. He had finished as a probationer, and passed his examination at the Central Flying School and was about to be passed out. Second Lieutenant Cooper said that he flew a Bleriot, with a 50-horse power Gnome engine, on Tuesday. The machine itself was new, and the engine had been rebuilt. It had recently been thoroughly overhauled and was more trustworthy than a new one.

Major Maclean said that Lieut. Morkill prepared to start at Shoreham on his return to Gosport at 6.15 on Tuesday evening. The engine was running satisfactorily, but witness observed a leak in the oil system and a new oil pipe was fitted. When about 200ft up the engine missed once or twice and appeared to stop. It turned down the wind to land for the aerodrome but did so too flatly, thus causing sideslip, which developed into a nosedive. On a subsequent examination of the engine witness found that one of the balance weights of the valves was fractured. If it fractured in the air, which was a common thing to happen, it would cause a miss in the engine, but what actually happened must be largely supposition. If Lieutenant Morkill had been 3,000ft up he would have been alive now, as he would have had time to right the machine, but he was too low down. The engine was tested before starting, and appeared to be in perfect working order.

A verdict of ‘Accidental death’ was returned, sympathy being expressed with the relatives.

24 December 1915

CRAVEN’S ROLL OF HONOUR – BELL BUSK

Lieut. Ronald Falshaw Morkill, of a Yorkshire regiment, subsequently of the Royal Flying Corps, son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Morkill of Newfield Hall, Bell Busk, died on June 21st from injuries received in a flying accident. Married a few months before he died.

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