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Theodore Bayley HARDY

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Surname: HARDY

Forename(s): Theodore Bayley

Place of Birth: Exeter, Devon

Service No: ---

Rank: Chaplain 4th Class

Regiment / Corps / Service: Army Chaplains’ Department

Battalion / Unit: attd. 8th (Service) Battalion, Lincolnshire Regiment

Division: 37th Division

Age: 54

Date of Death: 1918-10-18

Awards: V.C., D.S.O., M.C., M.I.D.

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: S. V. J. 1.

CWGC Cemetery: ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: HIGH BENTHAM, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Theodore Bayley Hardy (born 20 October 1863) was the son of George and Sarah Richards Hardy, formerly Huntley, née Beedle. George was born at Harberton and Sarah at Exeter, Devon.

1871 Exeter, Devon Census: 25, Southernhay - Theodore B. Hardy, aged 7 years, born Exeter, son of Sarah Richards Hardy, widow.

1881 Paddington, London Census: 124, Elgin Road - Theodore B. Hardy, aged 17 years, born Exeter, Devon, son of Sarah R. Hardy, widow.

Theodore was married to Florence Elizabeth Hastings in 1888.

1891 Nottingham, Nottinghamshire Census: 11, Ossington Villas - Theodore B. Hardy, aged 27 years, born Exeter, Devon. [Theodore with his wife and daughter were boarding with Jemimah? East, widow.]

1901 Nottingham, Nottinghamshire Census: 7, Yew Tree Avenue - Theodore B. Hardy, aged 37 years, born Exeter, Devonshire, husband of Florence E. Hardy.

1911 Bentham, Yorkshire Census: The Grammar School - Theodore Bayley Hardy, aged 47 years, born Exeter, Devon, husband of Florence Elizabeth Hardy.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: 1. Rev T.B. Hardy D.S.O. Temporary Chaplain to the Forces. Army Chaplains' Department. M.I.D., London Gazette, 24 December 1917. 2. Revd. T.B. Hardy, V.C., Lincolnshire Regiment. Correspondence: Application for Medals from Major W.H. Hardy, 30 January 1921. Son and next of kin to Rev: T.B. Hardy V.C. Address: Miss M.E. Hardy, Ivy House, Manea, Cambs.

Theodore is commemorated on the Hutton Roof War Memorial.

See also:
‘"It’s only me": A life of The Reverend Theodore Bayley Hardy, V.C., D.S.O., M.C., 1863-1918, Vicar of Hutton Roof, Westmorland’ by David Raw (1988).
‘Bentham’s Part in the Great War 1914-18’ by Allan and Marilyn Hartley (2019).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

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Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record: ---

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Chaplain 4th Class Theodore Bayley HARDY

Chaplain 4th Class Theodore Bayley HARDY

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Army Chaplains’ Department

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Army Chaplains’ Department

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 37th Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 37th Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HARDY

Forename(s): Theodore Bayley

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: Rev

Regiment: Royal Army Chaplains' Department

Battalion:

Decorations: V.C., D.S.O., M.C.

Died Date: 18/10/18

Died How: Died of wounds

Theatre of War:

Notes: (Att 8th Linc R)

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HARDY

Forename(s): The Rev. Theodore Bailey

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Chaplain 4th Class

Regiment: Army Chaplains' Department attd. 8th Bn. Lincolnshire Regiment

Unit:

Age: 54

Awards: V C, D S O, M C, Mentioned in Despatches

Died Date: 18/10/1918

Additional Information: Appointed Chaplain to His Majesty, 17th Sept., 1918. Son of George and Sarah Richards Hardy, of Exeter; husband of the late Florence Elizabeth Hardy (nee Hastings), of Hutton Roof Vicarage, Kirkby Lonsdale, Westmorland. B.A. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: LOVE NEVER FAILETH)

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'The London Gazette' (9 July, 1918)

An extract from the London Gazette, No. 30790, dated 9th July, 1918, records the following:-"For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on many occasions. Although over 50 years of age, he has, by his fearlessness, devotion to men of his battalion, and quiet unobtrusive manner, won the respect and admiration of the whole division. His marvellous energy and endurance would be remarkable even in a very much younger man, and his valour and devotion are exemplified in the following incidents: An infantry patrol had gone out to attack a previously located enemy post in the ruins of a village, the Reverend Theodore Bailey Hardy (C.F.) being then at company headquarters. Hearing firing, he followed the patrol, and about four hundred yards beyond our front line of posts found an officer of the patrol dangerously wounded. He remained with the officer until he was able to get assistance to bring him in. During this time there was a great deal of firing, and an enemy patrol actually penetrated between the spot at which the officer was lying and our front line and captured three of our men. On a second occasion when an enemy shell exploded in the middle of one of our posts, the Reverend T. B. Hardy at once made his way to the spot, despite the shell and trench mortar fire which was going on at the time, and set to work to extricate the buried men. He succeeded in getting out one man who had been completely buried. He then set to work to extricate a second man, who was found to be dead. During the whole of the time that he was digging out the men this chaplain was in great danger, not only from shell fire, but also because of the dangerous condition of the wall of the building which had been hit by the shell which buried the men. On a third occasion he displayed the greatest devotion to duty when our infantry, after a successful attack, were gradually forced back to their starting trench. After it was believed that all our men had withdrawn from the wood, Chaplain Hardy came out of it, and on reaching an advanced post asked the men to help him to get in a wounded man. Accompanied by a serjeant he made his way to the spot where the man lay, within ten yards of a pill-box which had been captured in the morning, but was subsequently re-captured and occupied by the enemy. The wounded man was too weak to stand, but between them the chaplain and the serjeant eventually succeeded in getting him to our lines. Throughout the day the enemy's artillery, machine-gun and trench mortar fire was continuous, and caused many casualties. Notwithstanding, this very gallant chaplain was seen moving quietly amongst the men and tending the wounded, absolutely regardless of his personal safety."

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1919

HARDY Theodore Bayley of Hutton Roof vicarage Kirkby Lonsdale Westmoreland clerk died 18 October 1918 in France Probate London 14 November to William Hastings Hardy medical practitioner and Mary Elizabeth Hardy spinster. Effects £739 16s.

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Chaplain 4th Class Theodore Bayley Hardy

Chaplain 4th Class Theodore Bayley Hardy

Chaplain 4th Class Theodore Bayley Hardy being presented with the Victoria Cross by King George V on 9 August 1918 (Painting by Terence Cuneo (1966) from a photograph)

St John’s Church, Hutton Roof

St John’s Church, Hutton Roof

Brass memorial plaque to Chaplain 4th Class Theodore Bayley Hardy

St John’s Church, Hutton Roof

St John’s Church, Hutton Roof

War Memorial

St John’s Church, Hutton Roof

St John’s Church, Hutton Roof

War Memorial - detail

The High & Low Bentham men who gave their lives

The High & Low Bentham men who gave their lives

Top row (l-r): Rfn Ernest Knight Newhouse, Pte John Thornber, Reverend Theodore Bayley Hardy, Pte Richard Wilson, Pte Maurice Richard Bolton, Lieut John Barclay Clibborn, Pte William Throup, Pte Richard Wilcock Carr, A/Cpl William Robinson, Pte James Auton, Pte William Savage. Third row (l-r): L/Cpl David Percival Dixon, Pte John Emmott, Pte Francis Richard Townson, Pte John Adamthwaite, Pte Robert Carter, L/Cpl John Hutchinson, Pte Alfred Edward Gunn, Pte Ezra Stephenson, Pte Edwin Rawlinson Smith, Pte Richard Wearing, Lieut Basil William Ramsbotton. Third row (l-r): Spr Robert Clark, Act L/Cpl Thomas Wilcock, Cpl William Carr, Pte Lawrence Lancelot Dowbiggin, Pte Edward Magoolagan, Pte Isaac Rucastle, Pte Henry Taylor, Cpl Edward Ramskill, L/Cpl Edward Walton Briscoe, Pte Joseph Jackson, Gnr Ernest Wilcock. Fourth row (l-r): Capt Donald Morrison, Sgt Arthur Dean Blackburn, Pte James William Bell, Pte Leonard Nelson, L/Cpl John Edward Leeming, L/Cpl Albert Lister, Pte Percy Preston Whitfield, Cpl Tom Harry Smith, Cpl Thomas Walker Sanderson, Sgt William Patrick Tobin, Pte (Signaller) W. Wilkinson.

Courtesy of the artist, David Hartnup

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26 October 1917

HIGHER BENTHAM – D.S.O. FOR LATE HEADMASTER

The ‘London Gazette’ last week contained the name of the Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy amongst the twenty-seven soldiers who had won the D.S.O. in France. Mr. Hardy came to Bentham as headmaster in succession to Mr. Llewellyn who was presented with the living of Ingleton, and for about seven years faithfully carried out the duties of headmaster of Bentham Grammar School, winning many friends and admirers. On obtaining the living at Hutton Roof he gave up his post as headmaster some five years ago. Bentham people are delighted to hear of the good work he has been doing at the Front, where his son, Dr. Hardy, is also serving in the R.A.M.C

12 July 1918

HIGHER BENTHAM – Victoria Cross Awarded to the Rev. T. B. Hardie, B.A.

The Rev. T. B. Hardie’s success in France and the news that he had been awarded the coveted honour of the British Army caused much excitement at Bentham on Thursday morning, when the news became known amongst his friends who were very numerous in the district. Mr. Hardy came from Nottingham at Easter 1907 to take charge of the Bentham Grammar School as head, and for six and a half years he laboured patiently. When, in July of 1913, he was presented to the living of Hutton Roof, his wife died very suddenly. He joined as a Chaplain in 1916. His son graduated at Dublin and qualified as a physician, and joined the R.A.M.C. almost at the outbreak of hostilities. His only daughter, Miss Hardie, was studying at Dublin, but gave up and joined as a nurse, and all three are now in France.

19 July 1918

V.C. FOR FORMER BENTHAM GAMMAR SCHOOL HEADMASTER

As briefly mentioned in our last week’s issue, the Victoria Cross has been conferred upon the Rev. Theodore Bailey Hardy, D.S.O., M.C., Army Chaplain attached to the Lincolnshire Regiment, who, from Easter 1907 to 1913, was headmaster of the Bentham Grammar School and played a useful part in the social, educational and religious life of the village. He was presented to the living of Hutton Roof in 1913, and joined the Forces in 1916 as Chaplain. His son and daughter, the former (a physician) in the R.A.M.C., and the latter a nurse, are also in France. The work for which Mr. Hardy has been granted his distinguished honour is thus officially described:– “For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on many occasions. Although over fifty yeas of age he has, by his fearlessness, devotion to men of his battalion, and quiet, unobtrusive manner, won the respect and admiration of the whole battalion. His marvellous energy and endurance would be remarkable even in a very much younger man, and his valour and devotion are exemplified in the following incidents:–

“An infantry patrol had gone out to attack a previously located enemy position in the ruins of a village, the Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy (C.F.) being then at company headquarters. Hearing firing he followed the patrol, and about four hundred yards beyond our front line of posts found an officer of the patrol dangerously wounded. He remained with the officer until he was able to get assistance to bring him in. During this time there was a great deal of firing, and an enemy patrol actually penetrated between the spot at which the officer was lying and our front line and captured three of our men.

“On a second occasion, when an enemy’s shell exploded in the middle of one of our posts, the Rev. T. B. Hardy at once made his way to the spot, despite the shell and trench mortar fire which was going on at the time, and set to work to extricate the buried men. He succeeded in getting out one man who had been completely buried. He then set to work to extricate a second man, who was found to be dead.

“During the whole of the time that he was digging out the men this Chaplain was in great danger, not only from shellfire, but also because of the dangerous condition of the wall of the building, which had been hit by the shell which buried the men.

“On a third occasion he displayed the greatest devotion to duty when our infantry, after a successful attack, were gradually forced back to their starting trench.

“After it was believed that all our men had withdrawn from the wood, Chaplain Hardy came out of it, and on reaching an advanced post asked the men to help him to get in a wounded man. Accompanied by a sergeant, he made his way to the spot where the man lay within ten yards of a pillbox, which had been captured in the morning, but was subsequently recaptured and occupied by the enemy. The wounded man was too weak to stand, but between them the Chaplain and the sergeant eventually succeeded in getting him to our lines.

“Throughout the day the enemy’s artillery, machinegun and trench mortar fire was continuous and caused many casualties.

“Notwithstanding, this very gallant Chaplain was seen moving quietly amongst the men and tending the wounded, absolutely regardless of his personal safety.”

16 August 1918

HIGHER BENTHAM – A V.C. Winner

At the monthly meeting of the Parish Council on Wednesday evening there were present:– Messrs. Edward Ayrton (in the chair), J. G. Leeming, John Parker, Thomas Marshall and John Clapham. A letter was read from Dr. Dow expressing sorrow at being called away on military duty, and suggesting that a letter of congratulation be sent to the Rev. T. B. Hardy on his being awarded the Victoria Cross. It was unanimously decided to send the following letter to Mr. Hardy:–

“Rev. Sir, – Although we feel sure from our knowledge of your disposition that any public expression would be distasteful to you, yet at our first Council meeting since your latest honour was bestowed upon you, we unanimously decided to place on record the Council’s high opinion of your services in the battlefield, and the pride they feel that our Sovereign has bestowed the Victoria Cross on you, who for many years resided amongst us.

“We remain, yours respectfully on behalf of the Parish Council,
Edward Ayrton, chairman, Thomas Marshall, vice-chairman.”

The question of lighting the streets this coming winter was considered, and after some discussion the question was adjourned for a month.

20 September 1918

HIGH BENTHAM

The Rev. E. B. Hardy, V.C., has been made a King’s Chaplain. He was the late headmaster of Bentham School.

25 October 1918

HIGH BENTHAM – THE REV. T. B. HARDY, V.C., DIES OF WOUNDS

The many friends of the Rev. Theodore Bailey Hardy, V.C., M.C., D.S.O., a former headmaster of Bentham Grammar School, and whose V.C. honour we recently reported in our columns, will be grieved to hear that he has died at a hospital in the north of France from gunshot wounds. He was decorated with the V.C. by the King during his visit to France in August last. Although over 50 years of age, Mr. Hardy was most anxious to serve in France as a Chaplain, and after being refused as too old, was ultimately permitted to go. After Mr. Hardy won the V.C., His Majesty appointed him as one of his domestic Chaplains, and was very anxious that he should return to this country, but Mr. Hardy had become so wedded to his duties at the Front that he declined to leave the men of whom he had grown so fond, and in whose interests he did so much.

After being assistant master at Nottingham High School, Mr. Hardy was successively curate at Burton Joyce, Notts. and New Basford, in the Southwell diocese. In 1906 he became headmaster of Bentham Grammar School, and seven years’ later was appointed Vicar of Hutton Roof, Westmorland. A daughter of Mr. Hardy, who was a widower, is serving at a military hospital at Dunkirk, and his son, Dr. Hardy, with the R.A.M.C.

The London correspondent of the ‘York Post’ writes:– “The King’s deep regret over the death of his most recently appointed domestic Chaplain, the Rev. Theodore Bailey Hardy, will be shared by thousands of soldiers, and especially the men of the Lincolnshires, of which regiment Mr. Hardy was the admired and beloved padre. Mr. Hardy has died of wounds, in hospital, in France, after two years’ service on the Western Front, crowded with deeds of bravery and self-sacrifice. A year ago he was awarded the D.S.O. A few months later the Military Cross, and in August last received from the King himself in France the Victoria Cross – all for service to the wounded in circumstances calling for the most amazing courage and devotion. Mr. Hardy, who was over fifty years of age, and had been a schoolmaster at Nottingham, and head of the Grammar School at Bentham, as well as a curate at Burton Joyce, and vicar of Hutton Roof, Kirkby Lonsdale, was the third Chaplain winner of the V.C. during the present war. The others to whom the Cross has been awarded are the Rev. W. R. F. Addison, for conspicuous bravery in Mesopotamia; and the Rev. E. N. Mellish, a young curate at Deptford, who, like Mr. Hardy, was decorated for work on the Western Front. The first clergyman on the famous roll was the Rev. James William Adams, who gained the distinction as long ago as 1897 in an Afghan war.”

The sad news reached Bentham on Sunday morning and universal sorrow was expressed at his untimely end. Reference was made to his decease at the various places of worship, and flags were flown half-mast at the Grammar School, St. Margaret’s Church, and at Messrs. Angus and Co.’s works.

Mr. Hardy came from Nottingham Grammar School to be headmaster of Bentham in 1906. He was chosen from a number of applicants, and was revered by his pupils. He took a kindly interest in their sports and taught quite a number of them to swim, and was also the means of a very strong swimming club being formed amongst other things which are still in existence.

08 November 1918

HIGH BENTHAM – St. Margaret's Memorial Service

The season of All Saints was observed at St. Margaret’s as a special memorial service for all those from the parish who have made the great sacrifice. Special mention being made to Chaplain T. B. Hardy, V.C., who was formerly headmaster of Bentham, and Gunner Atkinson (who married Miss Briscoe of this parish) and Quarter-Master-Sergeant C. Beck – the latest who have laid down their lives. The service was conducted by the Vicar and was very impressive. The Dead March in ‘Saul’ was played at the evening service.

04 July 1919

PEACE SUPPLEMENT TO THE 'CRAVEN HERALD' – CRAVEN'S FALLEN OFFICERS

REV. THEODORE BAILEY HARDY, V.C., M.C., D.S.O.

A former headmaster of Bentham Grammar School, Chaplain to the Forces, and died in hospital in France October, 1918, from gunshot wounds. Was domestic chaplain to the King.

21 November 1919

HIGHER BENTHAM – A V.C. Chaplain’s Estate

The Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy, V.C., D.S.O., M.C., of Hutton Roof Vicarage, Kirkby Lonsdale, formerly headmaster of Bentham Grammar School, who died from wounds received in action on the 18th October, 1918, left estate valued for probate at £739 16s. The testator left all his property to his daughter, expressing the wish that his son might be allowed to select any articles be might wish from amongst the household effects.

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26 October 1917

BENTHAM

D.S.O. FOR LATE HEADMASTER – The ‘London Gazette’ last week contained the name of Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy amongst the 27 soldiers who had won the D.S.O. in France. Mr. Hardy, came to Bentham as headmaster in succession to Mr. Llewellyn, who was presented with the living of Ingleton, and for about seven years faithfully carried out the duties of headmaster of Bentham Grammar School, winning many friends and admirers. He was then given the living at Hutton Roof. He gave up his post as headmaster some five years ago. Bentham people are delighted to hear of the good work he has been doing at the front, where his son, Dr. Hardy, is also serving in the R.A.M.C. His daughter, Miss Hardy, is a V.A.D. in a Dunkirk hospital.

19 July 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Chaplain’s V.C., D.S.O., and M.C. – Former Bentham Headmaster’s Remarkable Record

The V.C. has been awarded to Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy, D.S.O., M.C., T.O.F., 4th Class, ‘A’ Chaplain Depot, attached Linc. Regt., the Vicar of Hutton Roof, near Kirkby Lonsdale, and formerly headmaster of Bentham Grammar School. The official account states:–

Following a patrol about 400 yards beyond our front line of posts, Chaplain Hardy found an officer dangerously wounded, and remained with him until he was able to get assistance to bring him in. During this time an enemy patrol actually penetrated between the spot where the officer was lying and our front line, and captured three of our men. When an enemy shell exploded in the middle of an outpost, Chaplain Hardy went to the spot and, under shell and trench mortar fire, extricated 2 men who had been buried. One of these, however, was found to be dead. On another occasion, and accompanied by a sergeant, he went to the help of a wounded man lying within ten yards of a pill-box occupied by the enemy, and succeeded in getting the man, who was too weak to stand, back to our lines. Chaplain Hardy’s marvellous energy and endurance would be remarkable in a very much younger man.

Rev. Theodore Bayley Hardy beside being for six years the headmaster of the Bentham Grammar School, took clerical duty in many of the surrounding parishes in the Clapham Rural Deanery. As a headmaster he was a man of high ideals, and old pupils speak of him with esteem. He took much interest in the young life of the township, and was president of the Bentham Amateur Swimming Club. He was an enthusiast in natation, and taught it eagerly.

He was appointed vicar of Hutton Roof, a picturesque but isolated township with a small and exceedingly pretty church, in 1913. His predecessor as headmaster, Rev. J. Llewellyn, became Vicar of Ingleton, and is now retired. As Vicar of Hutton Roof, Mr. Hardy had pastoral charge at Lupton, near Kirkby Lonsdale, and beside filling three appointments at his own chinch, on a Sunday, he often took two others at Lupton. He is described as a zealous and conscientious clergyman, and in matters of duty spared not himself. Parishioners speak in the highest terms of his devotion to the sick and poor.

Each honour which has come to him since he took up the chaplaincy of one of the Lincoln Divisions, the M.C., and the D.S.O., seemed only to be in accordance with expectation from those who recognise his inflexibility of character. In anything that concerned duty he knew no fear. Such is the estimate of his parishioners, who have a real regard fur their vicar, and in spite of a modesty which shrinks from publicity in every way, they feel determined to show their appreciation when he conies among them again.

The tragic death of his wife four years ago filled the dale with sorrow – he found her dead one morning after returning from an early service. He had been chaplain of the forces since September, 1916, and his only son, Dr. William Hastings Hardy, an old Rossallian, has been serving with the R.A.M.C. at Salonica, and is at Alexandria, a malarial convalescent, and his only daughter has been acting as a nurse at Dunkirk.

News of the honour reached the last Thursday, and at Hutton Roof, Kirkby Lonsdale, and Bentham it was discussed with the greatest satisfaction and pride. Hutton Root found itself on the map in a very real sense, for it came in immediate touch with Fleet-street, and newspaper cars from distant cities piloted the interminable byways of the Lunesdale terrain to find what there was to know of the clerical V.C. Rev. F.W. Botterill, who has charge of the parish in the vicar’s absence, courteously dealt with all inquiries and the sheaf of telegrams which arrived. Mr. Hardy was a graduate of London University (1889), was ordained by the Bishop of Southwark in 1889, had one or two curacies in the South, but his life had been chiefly cast in the scholastic sphere. He was 18 years assistant master of the Nottingham High School, and the next six years he was headmaster at Bentham Grammar School.

When the news came to Hutton Roof, a knot of agricultural workers were foregathered at the village smithy, and they gave a hearty “Hip-hip-hurrah!” with a lung power that was disturbing to the animal and bird life of the adjacent limestone crags.

16 August 1918

BENTHAM

PARISH COUNCIL – The monthly meeting was held in the Overseers Office on Wednsday evening, Mr. Edward Ayrton Presiding, there were also present Messrs. J.C. Leemirng, John Parker. Thomas Marshall and John Clapham. A letter was read from Dr. Dow expressing his sorrow at being called away on Military duty, preventing him from attending the meeting and suggesting that a letter of congratulation be sent to Rev. T.B. Hardy V.C., D.S.O., M.C., on his being awarded the Victoria Cross. It was unanimously decided to send the following letter to Mr. Hardy:– “Rev. Sir, – Although we feel sure from our knowledge of your disposition that any public expression would be distasteful to you, yet at our first Council meeting since your latest honour was bestowed upon you, we unanimously decided to place on record the Council’s high opinion of your services in the battle field, and the pride they feel that our sovereign has bestowed the Victoria Cross on you, who for many years resided amongst us. We remain, yours respectfully, on behalf of the Parish Council, Ed. Ayrton, Chairman, Thomas Marshall, vice-chairman.”

The question of lighting the street this coming winter was considered and after some discussion it was decided to adjourn the matter for a month. Several small accounts were presented and a cheque made out for their payment.

25 October 1918

V.C. Chaplain’s Death from Wounds

News has been received of the death in hospital in France, from gun-shot wounds, of Rev. T.B. Hardy, V.C., D.S.O., M.C., for may years assistant master at the Nottingham High School before his appointment in 1907 to the head mastership of Bentham Grammar School, which he held for six and a half years. In 1913 he was preferred to the living of Priest Hutton, Westmorland, but in 1916 offered his services as chaplain. Mr. Hardy, who was over 50 years of age, was awarded the V.C. in July last. He had also won the D.S.O. and the Military Cross.

27 December 1918

BENTHAM SCHOOL

Governors’ Annual Meeting

The anneal meeting was held is the Overseer’s Room of the Town Hall on Friday night and nearly all the members were present.

The Rector was re-elected chairman; Mr. Joseph Cumberland secretary and correspondent;. and Mr. Thomas Marshall treasurer, and the various committees were also re-elected. £20 was distributed from the Longstaff’s Charity to poor and deserving inhabitants, and after the other business the chairman proposed that the following resolution be inscribed on the minutes.– “The Governors of the Bentham Grammar School have received with profound regret the sad news of the gallant death – from wounds while serving as chaplain to His Majesty’s Forces in France – of Rev. T.B. Hardy, B.A., late vicar of Hutton Roof, and formerly head master of Bentham Grammar School. By faithful devotion to duty and magnificent bravery he worthily gained a record distinction and world-wide fame by winning the three most coveted honour, of war viz., the V.C., the D.S.O., and the M.C., and as a further mark of universal regard received from the King the appointment to be one of His Majesty’s domestic chaplains. While head master of Bentham he won the admiration of all pupils, parents, and friends by his manly virtues and purity and simplicity of character. The governors deplore his death and tender to his son and daughter the expression of their deepest condolence.”

The Rector also proposed that the secretary convey to Mr. Thomas Carr, one of the present governors, and to Mrs. Carr, their condolence in the grievous and heart-rending loss they have sustained in the death of their two fine sons, killed at the front in France whilst bravely fighting for their King and country.

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