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William HOWSON

Main CPGW Record

Surname: HOWSON

Forename(s): William

Place of Birth: Hellifield, Yorkshire

Service No: MB/864

Rank: Chief Motor Mechanic

Regiment / Corps / Service: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

Battalion / Unit: H.M. 'M L378'

Division: ---

Age: 30

Date of Death: 1918-09-23

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: South of West end of Church.

CWGC Cemetery: HELLIFIELD (ST. AIDAN) CHURCHYARD

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: HELLIFIELD, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

William Howson (born 31 August 1888) was the son of Thomas and Isabella Howson, née Lupton. Thomas was born at Melling, Lancashire and Isabella at Shap, Westmorland.

1891 Hellifield, Yorkshire Census: 37, Midland Terrace, Arnford cum Newton - William Howson, aged 2 years, born Hellifield, son of Thomas and Isabella Howson.

1901 Hellifield, Yorkshire Census: 37, Midland Terrace, Arnford cum Newton - William Howson, aged 12 years, born Hellifield, son of Thomas and Isabella Howson.

1911 Kirkby Malham, Yorkshire Census: Victoria Hotel - William Howson, aged 20 years, born Hellifield, Yorkshire, son of Thomas and Isebla [sic] Howson.

William was married to Annie Evans, the sister of Driver Harry Evans (2124) (q.v.) in 1915.

William survived a motor car accident in 1915 (not far from where he was to be killed in 1918), in which 2nd Lieutenant Ernest Roscoe (q.v.) died from his injuries - see: 'Craven Herald' (2 July1915).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

HOWSON, W., R.N.A.S., Main Road, [Hellifield], killed in accident Draughton, Sept. 23, 1918.

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Chief Motor Mechanic William HOWSON

Chief Motor Mechanic William HOWSON

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

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Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

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Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HOWSON

Forename(s): William

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: MB/864

Rank: Chief Motor Mechanic

Regiment: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

Unit: H.M. "M L378"

Age: 30

Awards:

Died Date: 23/09/1918

Additional Information: Son of Thomas and Isabella Howson. Born at Hellifield. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: THY WILL BE DONE)

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England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1918

HOWSON William of Town End Long Preston Yorkshire died 23 September 1918 at the Cottage Hospital Skipton Yorkshire Administration Wakefield 31 December to Annie Howson widow. Effects £74 7s.

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St Aidan's Churchyard, Hellifield

St Aidan's Churchyard, Hellifield

CWGC Headstone

St Aidan's Churchyard, Hellifield

St Aidan's Churchyard, Hellifield

CWGC Headstone - personal inscription

Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Courtesy of John Pearcy, Hellifield

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Courtesy of John Pearcy, Hellifield

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Courtesy of John Pearcy, Hellifield

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Order of Service for the Unveiling and Dedication of Hellifield War Memorial, Sunday, 5 June 1921

Courtesy of John Pearcy, Hellifield

View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

27 September 1918

MOTOR FATALITY AT DRAUGHTON

At the Town Hall, Skipton. On Tuesday afternoon, Mr. Edgar Wood, district coroner, and a jury enquired into the circumstances surrounding the death of Naval Motor Mechanic William Howson (30), of Ilkley, who died at the Skipton and District Hospital on the previous day as the result of colliding with a motor ambulance while riding a motor cycle at Draughton, near Skipton, on Monday.

Dr. Liversidge said he saw the deceased at the hospital about 11-30 on Monday morning, where he died almost immediately after his admittance from a very badly fractured skull.

The Coroner asked Dr. Liversidge if a small receiving ward could not be provided at the hospital for serious accidents, as it was very distressing for the patients in the ward when a person was brought in in a dying condition.

Dr. Liversidge said that screens were put round such patients whenever possible, and said it was custom that was followed in every hospital. He admitted that it was very distressing, especially if a badly injured person was taken into a female ward, but it was not so in this case. He added that in normal times there was a private ward at the hospital, but this was occupied now by the wounded soldiers. He admitted that it would certainly be an improvement if a ward could be provided.

John Howson, butcher, of Hellifield, identified the body as that of his brother, who, he said, was an expert cyclist. He was not aware that his brother had had an accident with the cycle before. On the day of the accident deceased was on his way to Hellifield.

Miss Thackray, of 18, Tivoli Place, Ilkley, said the deceased had previously worked for her brother, who had a motor garage at Ilkley, and he came on his motor cycle from Hellifield on Sunday to stay with them. She had on several occasions ridden on the back of the cycle with the deceased, and he was a very steady driver. The deceased left Ilkley about 10-45 on Monday morning and he was then all right and quite sober. So far as she knew the machine was in good working order. She did not hear him make any complaints about the brakes.

Sergeant William Butler, of the St. John V.A.D., stationed at Southport, said he was sitting with the driver at the front of the motor ambulance at the time of the accident. They were travelling from Southport to Ilkley for some patients, and at Draughton they had to pull up to avoid some sheep and children. He saw deceased coming towards the ambulance at a speed which he estimated at 20 miles an hour. Deceased, who was riding in the middle of the road, tried to pull to his own side to avoid the ambulance, and in doing so his machine skidded, and he struck the side of the car. Witness turned round and saw the deceased spin round on his cycle and crash into the wall about ten yards at the rear of the ambulance. The ambulance was at a standstill about 12 inches from the grass on the left side.

The Coroner: Marks in the road show that the ambulance was nearer to the right hand side than the left.

Witness: They might have been caused when the car came back.

Witness added that he washed the deceased’s wound, put him into the ambulance and conveyed him to the hospital as quickly as possible.

In answer to Mr. E. Hadfield, solicitor, of Southport, who represented the driver of the ambulance, witness said he had ridden with the same driver all over England, and he had no complaint whatever to make about his driving.

P.C. Herbertson, of Silsden, gave evidence as to examining the road after the accident, as to the distance of the width of the road, and as to marks which might have been caused by the motor ambulance. There was nothing to guide him as to where the impact took place except some blood and mortar from the wall. He could find no evidence of skidding.

Edward Williamson, of Southport, the driver of the motor ambulance, also gave corroborative evidence, and added that the outside wing, lamps, and the body of the ambulance were damaged.

The jury returned a verdict of “accidental death,” and exonerated the driver from blame.

Mr. Hadfield, on behalf of Williamson, expressed his sympathy to the relatives of the deceased, with which the jury associated themselves.

04 October 1918

HOWSON – September 23rd (accidentally at Draughton), William Howson, aged 30, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Howson, Main Road, Hellifield.

04 October 1918

HELLIFIELD – THE LATE NAVAL MOTOR MECHANIC W. HOWSON

The funeral of the late Naval Motor Mechanic W. Howson, whose death under tragic circumstances we recorded last week, took place at St. Aidan’s burial ground, Hellifield, on Friday. The Rev. R. Shipman, Long Preston, officiated. Naval Motor Mechanic Howson, who was 30 years of age, was the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Howson, of Main Road, Hellifield. He was formerly employed in the gas department at Hellifield Station, but at the time of joining the Navy in January, he was engaged as a motor mechanic at Ilkley by Mr. C. Thackeray. He was married three years ago, and his wife, who is residing with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. Evans, Town End, Long Preston, gave birth to a daughter two days after his death.

The following letter, signed by a number of comrades, has been received by Mr. Howson:– “All of us on M.L. 378 want you to know how deeply we sympathise and grieve with you in our bereavement. I say ‘our bereavement,’ because Will Howson was not only a companion, but was a very real friend to all of us on board, and was unsparing in his efforts to make everyone comfortable and happy. We hope that it will be of some small comfort and help to you to know that your sorrow is shared by us all. In spite of our grief we all feel lucky to have known Will, as he had endeared himself to us by his readiness to help in any possible way to our comfort, and his friendship has been an example.”

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

17 September 1918

MOTOR FATALITY NEAR SKIPTON

Naval Motor Mechanic’s Tragic End

The little village of Draughton was the scene of a sad accident which happened (in what is known locally) near Petyt’s Corner, and resulted in the death of a motor cyclist who was travelling from Ilkley to Hellifield on Monday last. The deceased, who was a native of Ilkley, was Naval Motor Mechanic Wm. Howson. He was travelling on the Addingham-Skipton road, and at the place stated ran into a motor ambulance from Southport, which was going to Ilkley for some patients. He died at the Skipton and District Hospital immediately after his admittance from a fracture of the base of the skull.

The inquiry relative to Howson’s death was held by Mr. Edgar Wood (district coroner) and a jury at the Town Hall, Skipton, on Tuesday afternoon.

Dr. Liversedge said he saw the deceased at the hospital about 11-30 on Monday morning, where he died almost immediately after is admittance from a very badly fractured skull.

The Coroner asked Dr. Liversedge if a small receiving ward could not be provided at the hospital for serious accidents, as it was very distressing for the patients in the ward when a person was brought in in a dying condition.

Dr. Liversedge said that screens were put around whenever possible, and said it was a custom that was followed in every hospital. He admitted that it was very distressing, especially if a badly injured person was taken into a female ward, but it was not so in this case. He added that in normal times there was a private ward at the hospital, but it was now occupied by the wounded soldiers. He admitted that it would certainly be an improvement if a ward could be provided.

John Howson, butcher, of Hellifield, identified the body as that of his brother, who he said was an expert cyclist. He was not aware that his brother had had an accident with the cycle before. He last saw his brother on Saturday, and on the day of the accident deceased was on his way to Hellifield.

Miss Thackray, of 18, Tivoli Place, Ilkley, said the deceased had previously worked for her brother, who had a motor garage at Ilkley, and he came on his motor cycle from Hellifield on Sunday to stay with him. She had on several occasions ridden on the back of the cycle with the deceased, and he was a very steady driver. The deceased left Ilkley about 10-45 on Monday morning, and he was then all right and quite sober. So far as she knew the machine was in good working order. She did not hear him make any complaint about the brakes.

Sergt. Wm. Butler, of the St. John’s V.A.D., stationed at Southport, said he was sitting with the driver at the front of the motor ambulance at the time of the accident. They were travelling from Southport to Ilkley for some patients, and at Draughton they had to pull up to avoid some sheep and children. He saw a motor cyclist coming towards the ambulance at a speed which he estimated at 20 miles an hour. The cyclist, who was riding in the middle of the road, tried to pull into his own side to avoid the ambulance, and in so doing his machine skidded, and he struck the side of the car. Witness turned round and saw the deceased spin round on his cycle and crash into the wall about ten yards at the rear of the The ambulance was at a standstill about 12 inches from the grass on the left side.

The Coroner: Marks in the road show that the ambulance was nearer to the right hand side than the left.

Witness: They might have been caused when the car came back.

Witness added that he washed the deceased’s wound, put him into the ambulance and conveyed him to the hospital as quickly as possible.

In answer to Mr. E. Hadfield, solicitor of Southport, who represented the driver of the ambulance, witness said he had ridden with the same driver all over England, and he had no complaint whatever to make about his driving.

P.C. Herbertson, of Silsden, gave evidence as to examining the road after the accident as to the distance of the width of the road, and to wheel marks which might have been those of the motor ambulance. There was nothing to guide him as to where the impact took place except some blood and mortar from the wall. He could find no evidence of skidding.

Edward Williamson, of Southport, driver of the motor ambulance, also gave corroborative evidence; and added that an outside wing, lamps, and the body of the ambulance were damaged.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death,” and exonerated the driver from all blame.

Mr. Hadfield, on behalf of Williamson, expressed his sympathy to the relatives of the deceased, with whose remarks the jury also wished to associate themselves.

04 October 1918

LOCAL HEROES OF THE WAR

The Late Naval Mechanic W. Howson

The funeral of the late Naval Motor Mechanic W. Howson, an account of whose death under tragic circumstances appeared in last week’s ‘Pioneer,’ took place at St. Aidan’s Church burial-ground, Hellifield, on Friday. Rev. R. Shipman (Long Preston) officiated. Naval Motor Mechanic Howson, who was 30 years of age, was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Howson, of Main Road, Hellifield. He was formerly employed in the gas department at Hellifield Station by the Midland Railway Co., but at the time of joining the Navy in January, 1916, he was engaged as a motor mechanic at Ilkley by Mr. C. Thackeray. He was married three years ago, and his wife, who is residing with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. Evans, Town End, Long Preston, gave birth to a daughter two days after his demise. The following letter signed by a number of comrades has been received by Mr. Howson:– “All of us on M.L. 378 want you to know how deeply we sympathise and grieve with you in our bereavement. I say our bereavement, because Will Howson was not only a companion but was a very real friend to all of us on board, and was unsparing in his efforts to make everyone comfortable and happy. We hope that it will be of some small comfort and help to you to know that your sorrow is shared by us all. In spite of our grief, we all feel lucky to have known Will, as he has endeared himself to us by his readiness to help in any possible way to our comfort; his friendship has been an example.”

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