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William TOMLINSON (1)

Main CPGW Record

Surname: TOMLINSON

Forename(s): William

Place of Birth: Skipton, Yorkshire

Service No: 371

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Australian Infantry

Battalion / Unit: 7th Battalion

Division: 1st Australian Division

Age: 28

Date of Death: 1915-04-25

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: 29.

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: LONE PINE MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: SKIPTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

William Tomlinson was the son of George and Mary Thompson, née Sayers. George was born at Nottingham, Nottinghamshire and Mary at Ripon, Yorkshire.

1891 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 59, Newmarket Street - William Tomlinson, aged 4 years, born Skipton, son of George and Mary Tomlinson.

1901 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 80, Castle Street - William Tomlinson, aged 14 years, born Skipton, son of George and Mary Thompson.

William was married to Elizaberth Barker in 1909.

1911 Skipton, Yorkshire Census: 7, Chancery Lane - William Tomlinson, aged 24 years, born Skipton, husband of Elizabeth Tomlinson.

William is named on the Skipton War Memorial as G. Tomlinson.

The image of the cap badge also shows the colour patch of the battalion.

Australian service records: www.naa.gov.au › The collection › Popular research topics › Defence › Service records

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

TOMLINSON, Wm., Australian Imperial Forces, husband of Mrs. Tomlinson, 57, Newmarket Street, Skipton, reported missing since April 24, 1915, now presumed killed.

TOMLINSON, George, 25th April, 1915. [Additional]

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Private William TOMLINSON

Private William TOMLINSON

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Australian Infantry

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Australian Infantry

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 1st Australian Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 1st Australian Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: No entry in SDGW - Australian Forces.

Forename(s):

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank:

Regiment:

Battalion:

Decorations:

Died Date:

Died How:

Theatre of War:

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: TOMLINSON

Forename(s): William

Country of Service: Australian

Service Number: 371

Rank: Private

Regiment: Australian Infantry, A.I.F.

Unit: 7th Bn.

Age: 28

Awards:

Died Date: 25/04/1915

Additional Information: Son of George and Mary Tomlinson; husband of Elizabeth Tomlinson, of 11, Lumley St., Middlesbrough, England. Native of Skipton-in-Craven, Yorks.

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View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

03 December 1915

MISSING SINCE APRIL 24th – SKIPTON MAN’S FATE

A communication received this week by Mrs. Tomlinson, 14 Rogers Yard, suggests that another Skiptonian has lost his life while serving his country in the Gallipoli Peninsula.

The letter is from Second-Lieut. D. R. Crooks, Adjutant, 7th Battalion, Australian Imperial Forces, and is in the following terms:– “Dear Madam – In reply to your letter I regret to inform you that your husband, Pte. Tomlinson, has been “missing” since April 24th, the day we landed in the Peninsula. His company did excellent work but were cut off from the rest of the Battalion and were badly cut up. There is a possible chance of his bring a prisoner at Constantinople, but I fear it is very slight as we have had no record of it so far. Should we hear anything further regarding him you will he advised immediately.”

Pte. Tomlinson was a native of Skipton and his parents reside at 57 Newmarket Street. He was formerly employed in the Post Office Telegraph (Engineers) Department, and also worked in a similar capacity for the Midland Railway Company.

A year last July he emigrated to Australia and enlisted there on the outbreak of war. Prior to going to Gallipoli, Pte. Tomlinson’s Battalion was stationed, with other Australian troops, in Egypt, and it was while he was there that Mrs. Tomlinson last heard from him.

Since then she has made several attempts to obtain information regarding his whereabouts, but met with no success until this week, when she received the sad intelligence set out above.

Much sympathy is felt for Mrs. Tomlinson, who has one child.

27 October 1916

TOMLINSON – Reported missing since April 25th 1915, now assumed to be killed. Pte. Wm. Tomlinson, Australian Imperial Forces, husband of Mrs. Tomlinson, 57, Newmarket Street, Skipton.

27 October 1916

SKIPTON ‘AUSTRALIAN’S’ FATE – MISSING SINCE APRIL 1915: NOW REPORTED KILLED

After being reported as missing since April 25th, 1915, Pte. William Tomlinson (better known amongst his friends as George), of the Australian Forces, whose parents and wife and son reside at 57, Newmarket Street, Skipton, is now officially assumed to have been killed in action on the date named. The following letter has been received by Mrs. Tomlinson from the Australian Records Office:– “I sincerely regret to have to advise you that at a Court of Enquiry which sat on the 1st May, 1916 to determine the fate of your son, Pte. W. Tomlinson, 7th Batt. Australian Imperial Forces, who has been reported as missing on Gallipoli Peninsula since April 25th, 1915, it was found reasonable to assume that this solder had been killed in action on that date.” The customary letter of sympathy from the King and Queen was also enclosed.

Formerly a telegraphic workman in the employ at different periods of the Midland Railway and the Post Office, Pte Tomlinson went out to Australia a week before the outbreak of the war, and three weeks after landing in the Colony he enlisted in the Australian Forces and was sent out to Egypt for special training. Six months later he was sent to the Dardanelles and apparently was missing from the day he landed on the Peninsula. In reply to enquiries from his wife, an officer wrote in November last to the effect that Pte. Tomlinson’s Company did excellent work on the day they landed, but were cut off from the rest of the Battalion and badly cut up. There was a possible chance, he said, of Pte. Tomlinson being a prisoner at Constantinople, but it was only a slight one.

27 April 1917

TOMLINSON – In loving memory of Private George Tomlinson of the Australian Forces, reported missing Dardanelles, 25th April 1915, assumed killed. Beloved husband of Elizabeth Tomlinson.

Two sad years have passed away
Since this great sorrow fell,
But still to-day we mourn the loss
Of one we loved so well.

“His winning smile and loving face are pleasant to recall.”

Deeply mourned and sadly missed by his loving Wife and Child; also Father, Mother and Brothers.

26 April 1918

TOMLINSON – In loving memory of Private George Tomlinson, of the Australian Forces, reported missing Gallipoli, assumed killed 25th April, 1915, beloved husband of Elizabeth Tomlinson.

Far from his people and native home,
The cruel hand of war upon his good life fell.
In my heart your memory lingers
Ever fond and true,
In my life there’s not a moment
When I do not think of you.

Deeply mourned and sadly missed by his loving Wife and Child, also Father, Mother and Brothers.

25 April 1919

TOMLINSON – In loving memory of Private George Tomlinson, of the Australian Forces, reported missing on Gallipoli Peninsula, since April 25th, 1915, assumed killed, beloved husband of Elizabeth Tomlinson, of Skipton.

With aching hearts we shook his hand,
Tears glistened in our eyes:
We wished him luck, but little thought
It was his last good-bye.
His life was all he had to give,
And that he nobly gave;
For home and duty he did his best,
May God grant him Eternal rest.

Deeply mourned by his loving Wife and Child also Father, Mother and brothers (Jim in Australia).

23 April 1920

TOMLINSON – In loving memory of Private George Tomlinson (late of Skipton), Australian Forces, beloved husband of Elizabeth Tomlinson, reported wounded and missing, Gallipoli, 25th April 1915, presumed killed.

Sweet is his memory, dear husband of my heart,
My love to his memory never shall part;
Though years do come, be they many or few,
Will be years of remembrance, dear husband, of you.

Deeply mourned and sadly missed by his loving Wife and Child; also Father, Mother and Brothers; Jim in Australia.

22 April 1921

TOMLINSON – In loving memory of Private George Tomlinson of the Australian Forces, reported missing Gallipoli, 25th April, 1915, presumed killed, beloved husband of Elizabeth Tomlinson, late of Skipton.

Fresh in our mind your memory clings
Yet still our grief is strong;
But each passing year will nearer bring
The day we shall meet once more.

Sadly missed by his loving Wife and Child, also Father, Mother and Brothers. Inserted by his loving Wife in New Zealand.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

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10 December 1915

SKIPTON MAN MISSING

Mrs. Tomlinson, 14, Rogers Yard, Skipton, has received a letter from Second-Lieutenant D.R. Crooks, 7th Battalion Australian Imperial Force, to the effect that Private Tomlinson, her husband, has been missing since April 24th, the day the force landed in Gallipoli. The letter adds:– “His company were cut off from the rest of the battalion, and were badly cut up. There is a possible chance of his being a prisoner at Constantinople, but I fear it is very slight, as we have had no record of it so far.” Private Tomlinson was formerly employed in the Post Office telegraphs department, and he also worked for the Midland Railway Company. He went to Australia a year last July, and joined the colonial force on the outbreak of hostilities.

27 October 1916

TOMLINSON – Pte. Wm. Tomlinson, of the Australian Imperial Forces, husband of Mrs. Tomlinson, of Newmarket Street, Skipton, who has been missing since April 24th 1915, now reported killed.

27 October 1916

SKIPTON SOLDIER BELIEVED KILLED

Pte. William Tomlinson of the Australian Imperial Forces, son of Mrs. Tomlinson of 57, Newmarket Street, Skipton, with whom his wife and child reside, who has been reported missing since April 24th 1915, is now believed to have been killed in action. Just before the war he went out to Australia, and had only been there three weeks when he joined the 7th Battalion of the 1st Australian Imperial Forces. He was sent out to Egypt for special training, and after six months service there he was transferred to the Dardanelles. He was reported missing on the first day he landed on the Peninsular, April 24th 1915. Writing to his wife in the following November, an officer stated that the deceased was missing on the first day of the landing on the Peninsular, and that his company had done excellent work. They were cut off from the rest of the battalion, and were badly cut up. He also stated that there was a possible chance of him being a prisoner of war at Constantinople, but it was only a very slight one. The following letter was received last weekend by Mrs. Tomlinson from the Australian Record Office:– “I sincerely regret to have to advise you that at a Court of Enquiry which sat on the 1st May, 1916 to determine the fate of your son, Pte. W. Tomlinson, 7th Battalion Australian Imperial Forces, who has been reported as missing on Gallipoli Peninsula since April 25th, 1915, it was found reasonable to assume that this solder had been killed in action on that date.” The customary letter of sympathy from the King and Queen was also enclosed.

When residing in Skipton he was employed at different periods as a telegraphic workman by the Midland Railway and the Post Office.

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