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David WALLING

Main CPGW Record

Surname: WALLING

Forename(s): David

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 40749

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion / Unit: 23rd (Service) Battalion. (4th Tyneside Scottish)

Division: 34th Division

Age: 26

Date of Death: 1917-02-11

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: Panel 2.

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: PLOEGSTEERT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: BARNOLDSWICK, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

David Walling was the son of Francis and Hannah Fawcett Walling, née Collins and brother of Private James Walling (29963) (q.v.). Their father Francis was born at Preston Patrick, Westmorland and mother, Hannah, at Darlington, Co. Durham.

1901 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: East Hill Street - David Walling, aged 9 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Francis and Hannah F. Walling.

1911 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: 16, Ash Grove Terrace - David Walling, aged 19 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Francis and Hannah Walling.

David was married to Bertha Sheldrick in 1915.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte David Walling, 39530, West Riding Regiment & 40749, Northumberland Fusiliers.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: Pte David Walling, 39530, 9th W. Rid. R. att/23rd Northd Fus, 40749. Died.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: Pte David Walling, 40749, 23rd Bn Northd Fus. Date and Place of Death: 11.2.17 France. Officially accepted. To whom Authorised: Widow and sole legatee - Bertha. Amount Authorised: £6 5s. 6d.

David was killed in a trench raid and his unidentified body buried by the Germans in Lambersart Communal Cemetery Extension. His body was exhumed and re-buried by the then IWGC in either Cite Bonjean Military Cemetery, Armentières or Rue-Petillon Military Cemetery, Fleurbaix. Private Edward Faulkner (29/174) (q.v.) died of wounds that were probably received in this raid and Private Eli Waterworth, 40863 (q.v.) was awarded the M.M.
See also:
1. Stand To! The Journal of the Western Front Association No. 109 June/July 2017: Raiders Lost – Now Found – The Tyneside Scottish at Armentières – February 1917 by David Tattersfield.
2. Private William Smith, 40737 (q.v.) quoted in the 'Craven Herald' (23 February 1917).
3. Private Eli Waterworth, 40863 (q.v.) quoted in the 'Craven Herald' (9 March 1917) and in the 'West Yorkshire Pioneer' (9 March 1917).

A short biography of David is included in: ‘Barnoldswick - A small Town’s part in conflicts 1800 to 2014’ by Peter Ian Thompson (2014).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

WALLING, David, Tyneside Scottish (Northumberland Fusiliers), son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Walling, 20, Clifford Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Feb. 11, 1917.

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Private David WALLING

Private David WALLING

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Northumberland Fusiliers

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Northumberland Fusiliers

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 34th Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 34th Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: WALLING

Forename(s): David

Born: Barnoldswick, Yorks

Residence:

Enlisted: Barnoldswick

Number: 40749

Rank: Private

Regiment: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion: 23rd Battalion (Tyneside Scottish)

Decorations:

Died Date: 11/02/17

Died How: Died

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: Formerly 20080, West Riding Regt.

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: WALLING

Forename(s): David

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 40749

Rank: Private

Regiment: Northumberland Fusiliers

Unit: 23rd (Tyneside Scottish) Bn.

Age:

Awards:

Died Date: 11/02/1917

Additional Information: Husband of Bertha Walling, of 1, Church St., Cullingworth, Bradford, Yorks.

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View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

23 February 1917

WALLING – Killed in action, February 11th, Private David Walling, Tyneside Scottish (Northumberland Fusiliers), son of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Walling, 20, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick.

23 February 1917

BARNOLDSWICK – KILLED DURING A RAID ON ENEMY LINES

News came to hand on Tuesday that another Barnoldswick soldier, Private David Walling, of the Tyneside Scottish (Northumberland Fusiliers) had been killed in France on Sunday, the 11th inst. The deceased was 26, married, and one of three soldier sons of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Walling, 20, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick. Before joining the Army he was employed as a weaver at Mr. W. Horsfield’s Barnsey Shed. In a letter to Mrs. Walling (widow) Pte. W. Smith, a Barnoldswick comrade in the same battalion writes:– “Your husband went out on a raid into the German lines, and was hit by a bomb. I had my tea with him before we went over, and we arranged to look after each other’s things in case we didn’t get back. His other mates send you their deepest sympathy. You don’t realise the effect it has had upon us, as he was well liked by all the boys.”

Pte. Walling had been in France eight months.

02 March 1917

BARNOLDSWICK – PRIVATE DAVID WALLING

We reproduce a photograph of Pte. David Walling, of the Tyneside Scottish (Northumberland Fusiliers), who, as reported in our last week’s issue, was killed in France on Sunday, February 11th. Aged 26 and married, deceased was one of the three soldier sons of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Walling, of 20, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, and had been in France eight months. We extend sincere sympathy with the widow and family.

09 March 1917

BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER HONOURED

Pte. Eli Watson [Waterworth], Northumberland Fusiliers (Machine Gun Corps), has been awarded the Military Medal for bringing in wounded under fire during the fighting on the Somme. In a letter to his wife at 33, Cobden Street, announcing the fact he mentions that he “went over the top” along with Pte D. Walling, another Barnoldswick soldier in the same regiment, whose death was recorded a fortnight ago. “I suppose you will have heard by now (the letter continues); I did not know until yesterday, when the Company Commander called me out and told me I had been awarded the Military Medal.” Pte. Waterworth went to France last July. Before joining the Army he was a weaver at Moss Shed.

10 August 1917

BARNOLDSWICK – A MYSTERY CLEARED UP

About three months ago we gave a circumstantial report (with photograph) of the death of Pte. David Walling, Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walling, 20, Clifford Street, who had been killed in action in France. Pte. Walling was first reported missing (April [February] 11th), but shortly afterwards a letter was received from a Barnoldswick comrade, Pte. W. Smith [died of wounds, 6 May 1917], giving particulars of the time and place of his death, which, in the absence of official news, the family felt constrained to accept as authentic. After a lapse of several weeks, however, the hopes of the family were suddenly revived by the receipt of a telegram signed ‘David’ which [had] been sent from St. Pancras, from which it was inferred that the sender might be expected home on the morrow. The telegram, somewhat ambiguously worded, was addressed to a resident in a neighbouring street, whose wife, evidently unacquainted with the sender, jumped to the conclusion that it was intended for a married sister of Pte. Walling (who bore the same surname as the recipient), and residing in the same street, to whom the telegram was ultimately given. Quite naturally the parents clung to the hope that the report of his death might prove erroneous and that they would have the supreme pleasure of welcoming their son back from the dead. Thus for two or three whole days were they kept in a ferment of expectation and uncertainty, meeting every train, but alas! ‘no David.’ After a further period of agonizing suspense, and ready to clutch at every alternative, the parents communicated with another son who is in training near London, asking him to make inquiries, on the off-chance that David might have been unavoidably detained in London or might be suffering from temporary loss of memory. The consent of the military authorities was readily granted on the position being explained to them, and for two days the young man prosecuted a diligent search round the military hospitals and Red Cross agencies, with no better result. At length, however, the tangle has been unravelled by an official announcement from the War office confirming the death of Pte. Walling as having occurred on April 11th. He was 25 years of age and married. The case has naturally aroused a good deal of local interest and the family have been the recipients of numerous sympathetic letters and enquiries.

On Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Walling received a letter from a Barnoldswick comrade in the same regiment, stating that their younger son, Pte. James Walling, Duke of Wellington’s, had been slightly wounded by shrapnel in the right knee, after being in France six months.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

23 February 1917

WALLING – Feb. 11th, in France, Pte. David Walling, of the 4th Tyneside Scotttish (Northumberland Fusiliers), son of Mr. and Mrs. James Francis Walling, of 20, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, aged 26.

23 February 1917

BARNOLDSWICK – KILLED DURING A RAID ON ENEMY LINES

News came to hand on Tuesday that another Barnoldswick soldier, Private David Walling, of the 14th [4th] Tyneside Scottish (Northumberland Fusiliers) had been killed in France on Sunday, the 11th inst. The deceased was 26, married, and one of three soldier sons of Mr. and Mrs. Francis Walling, 20, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick. Before joining the Army he was employed as a weaver by Mr. W. Horsfield at Barnsey Shed. In a letter to Mrs. Walling (widow), Pte. W. Smith, a Barnoldswick comrade in the same battalion, writes:– “Your husband went out on a raid into the German lines, and was hit by a bomb. I had my tea with him before we went over, and we arranged to look after each others things in case we didn’t get back. His other mates send you their deepest sympathy. You don’t realise the effect it has had upon us, as he was well liked by all the boys.”

Pte. Walling had been in France eight months.

09 March 1917

BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER HONOURED

Pte. Eli Waterworth, Northumberland Fusiliers (Machine Gun Corps), has been awarded the Military Medal for bringing in wounded under fire during the fighting on the Somme. In a letter to his wife at 33, Cobden Street, announcing the fact he mentions that he “went over the top” along with Pte D. Walling, another Barnoldswick soldier in the same regiment, whose death was recorded a fortnight ago. “I suppose you will have heard by now” (the letter continues), “I did not know until yesterday, when the Company-Commander called me out and told me I had been awarded the Military Medal.” Pte. Waterworth went to France last July. Before joining the Army he was a weaver at Moss Shed.

10 August 1917

BARNOLDSWICK

A MYSTERY CLEARED UP

About three months ago we gave a circumstantial report (with photo) of the death of Pte. David Walling, Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Walling, 20, Clifford Street, who had been killed in action in France. Pte. Walling was first reported missing (April 11th), but shortly afterwards a letter was received from a Barnoldswick comrade, Pte. W. Smith, giving particulars of the time and place of his death, which in the absence of official news, the family felt constrained to accept as authentic. After a lapse of several weeks, however, the hopes of the family were suddenly revived by the receipt of a telegram signed “David,” which had been sent from St. Pancras, from which it was inferred that the sender might be expected home on the morrow. The telegram, somewhat ambiguously worded, was addressed to a resident in a neighbouring street whose wife, evidently unacquainted with the sender, jumped to the conclusion that it was intended for a married sister of Pte. Walling (who bore the same surname as the recipient), and living in the same street to whom the telegram was ultimately handed. Quite naturally the parents clung to the hope that the report of his death night prove erroneous, and that they would have the supreme pleasure of welcoming their son back from the dead. Thus for two or three whole days were they kept in a ferment of expectation and uncertainty, meeting every train, but alas! “no David.” After a further period of agonizing suspense, and ready to clutch at every alternative, the parents communicated with another son who is in training near London, asking him to make enquiries, on the off-chance that David might have been unavoidably detained in London or might be suffering from temporary loss of memory. The consent of the military authorities was readily granted on the position being explained to them, and for two days the young man prosecuted a diligent search round the military hospitals and Red Cross Agencies, with no better result. At length, however, the tangle has been unravelled by an official announcement from the War Office confirming the death of Pte. Walling, as having occurred on April 11th. He was 25 years of age and married Tho case has naturally aroused a good deal of local interest, and the family have been the recipients of numerous sympathetic letters and enquiries.

On Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Walling received a letter from a Barnoldswick comrade in the same regiment, stating that their younger son, Pte. James Walling, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, had been slightly wounded by shrapnel in the right knee, after being in France six months.

17 August 1917

BARNOLDSWICK

ANOTHER TELEGRAM MYSTERY

A short time ago Mrs. James Parkinson, Bankfield Street, whose husband has been a prisoner of war in Germany over two years, received a telegram signed “Jim,” informing her that the sender might be expected to arrive by a certain train. The telegram, which had been handed in at Lancaster, was addressed to a house in Colin Street, where Mrs. Parkinson and her husband formerly resided. The family were naturally elated at the receipt of such unexpected news, but as in the case of Pte. Walling their hopes were falsified, though as yet no solution of the mystery has been reached. If, as some people are inclined to suspect, it has been done for a hoax, it is a particularly heartless one, for which the perpetrator deserves to smart.

30 August 1918

Barnoldswick Prisoner

On Sunday Mr. and Mrs. F. Walling, 20, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, were re-assured on receiving a post card from their son, Pte. Jas. Walling, West Riding Regiment, stating that he was a prisoner in Germany and quite well. Only two days previously they had received an official intimation that he had been missing since 22nd July. Mr. and Mrs. Walling have had one son killed in the war.

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