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George Henry BUTT

Main CPGW Record

Surname: BUTT

Forename(s): George Henry

Place of Birth: Hawes, Yorkshire

Service No: 122064

Rank: Gunner

Regiment / Corps / Service: Royal Horse Artillery

Battalion / Unit: 'D' Battery 14th Brigade

Division: 7th Division

Age: 21

Date of Death: 1916-09-07

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: VI. A. 3.

CWGC Cemetery: QUARRY CEMETERY, MONTAUBAN

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: BASHALL EAVES, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: HAWES, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: LONG PRESTON, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

George Henry Butt was the son of Frederick Henry and Mary Alice Butt, née Kilburn and brother of Private Wilfred Butt (203544) (q.v.). Their father was born at Bruton, Somerset and mother at Ingleton, Yorkshire. George and Wilfred were cousins of L/Corporal John William Kilburn (2984) (q.v.) and L/Sergeant Herbert Hewitt (15/449) (q.v.).

1901 Lunds, Yorkshire Census: South Lunds Railway Cottages - George Henry Butt, aged 6 years, born Hawes, Yorkshire, son of Frederick Henry and Mary Alice Butt.

1911 Long Preston, Yorkshire Census: Main Street - George Henry Butt, aged 15 years, born Hawes, Yorkshire, son of Frederick Henry and Mary Alice Butt.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Gnr George Butt, 122064, Royal Horse Artillery.

See also: 'Long Preston and the Great War' by Long Preston Heritage Group (2015).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

BUTT, Gunner George, aged 21, R.F.A, son of Mr. and Mrs. Butt of Long Preston, killed in action in France, Sept. 3.

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Gunner George Henry BUTT

Gunner George Henry BUTT

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Horse Artillery

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Royal Horse Artillery

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 7th Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 7th Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: BUTT

Forename(s): George

Born: Clitheroe, Lancs

Residence:

Enlisted: Settle, Yorks

Number: 122064

Rank: Gunner

Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery & Royal Field Artillery

Battalion:

Decorations:

Died Date: 07/09/16

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: BUTT

Forename(s): George

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 122064

Rank: Gunner

Regiment: Royal Horse Artillery

Unit: "D" Bty. 14th Bde.

Age: 21

Awards:

Died Date: 07/09/1916

Additional Information: Son of P. H. and M. A. Butt, of Main St., Long Preston, Yorks. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: PEACE PERFECT PEACE)

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View Additional Text For Soldier Records

Account of a visit to the World War 1 battlefields by my grandfather - Frederick Henry Butt

(Courtesy of Andrew Butt)

My visit to France and Belgium with Alfred Popay - September 1929.

We left Long Preston on the 31 August - arrived at Tilbury Docks - left there about midnight. The boat was very full - good sail across - arrived at Dunkirk about 6am after the usual ceremony through the Customs.

Left Dunkirk for Ypres, got digs, and then after a Belgian lunch, went to the unveiling of a war memorial to the 50th Northumbrian Division by General Plumer, a very big ceremony. Motored back to Ypres and visited the Menin Gate, and stayed a good time reading the names, and examining the arches and terraces that are covered with the 50,000 mens names that have no known graves.

In the evening we motored to Hell Fire Corner, Hill 60 and 62. Saw the trenches and the old scrap material of war - plenty of old water bottles, rifles and the various shells that had been left, also the memorials.

From there we went to the German frontier, and made our way home via a village fair, where there were three roundabouts going, also the various shooting galleries, etc.

Then on to Tyne Cott Cemetery, 12,000 graves beautifully kept. Saw a German Cemetery, wooden crosses, in a very bad way. Then on to a French Cemetery, beautifully kept, then to our digs.

MONDAY
Ypres to Hazebruck by train, had lunch and a look round, then on to Loos, had a good walk and look round, then on to Albert. Got digs at the Continental Café. Had a good look round the town which is getting built up again.

TUESDAY
Albert to Montauban by light railway - visited Quarry Cemetery where George [Granddad’s eldest son] is buried, 890 graves, a nice little place, well kept. After taking photo of grave, went across country to Flat Iron Copse Cemetery, 1523 graves. On our journey from Quarry Cemetery we passed the largest mine crater on the Somme, shells and war material of all kinds. Also saw a head skeleton of one of our poor old lads. From Flat Iron Cemetery, back Mametz village, on to Fricourt, then by train back to Albert.

WEDNESDAY
By train to Beaumont Hamel, visited an old village cemetery which had been very badly damaged by shell fire, called at Beaumont village for lunch, then to Waggon Road Cemetery, then on to Frankfurt Trench Cemetery, then through Hamel village to the Memorial to the 51st Highland Division, to Hunters Cemetery, Hawthorn Ridge Cemetery, to Newfoundland Memorial. Visited the trenches and dug-outs and saw tons of old war materials. Called at Leuze Hut for refreshments, then on to Thiepval, visited the Connaught Cemetery, Mill Road Cemetery, then to the Thiepval Tower Memorial. Went on the top of this and could see for miles, then made our way to Hamel station, on to Albert.

THURSDAY
Albert to Amiens by train, had two hours to wait so had a look round the town, and lunch, then by train to Rouen, the country very beautiful, apples and pears in abundance, stayed 15 minutes for rest at Serquiax [Serqueux], arrived at Rouen, got digs, and tea, and visited St Severs Cemetery where Wilfred [Granddad’s next eldest son] is buried. Found grave and took photos. This is an exceptional Cemetery, very beautiful, and a good way out of Rouen, about 3 or 4 miles.

FRIDAY
Left Rouen at 12.50pm after a good look round the City and the river and docks. It was market day, the biggest and most variable things on sale I have ever seen. There seemed to be all nations of people. Very hot on train going back from Rouen. Intended going to Dunkirk, but had enough when we got to Arras, where we stayed the night, and had a good look round. Got to bed in good time.

SATURDAY
Left Arras at 10.15am for Dunkirk, where we had lunch and then took motor bus to De Panne, Belgium. Met some people on bus from England and spent a very happy afternoon with them. These people were staying at Malo. This is a seaside place between Dunkirk and De Panne.

Spent the SUNDAY at De Panne on the sands, hundreds of people bathing. Alfred had a good time in the sea, very hot. Met some people from Ypres at De Panne.

MONDAY
Another stretch on the sands, then a little shopping. Left for Malo after dinner, and spent a pleasant afternoon and evening with friends from London, who saw us off at Dunkirk 11.30pm for home.

Good voyage across, arrived in London about 8am. Had a good breakfast, Alfred a double one, at Lyons Cafe, then by tram to Piccadilly Circus and other places - Buckingham Palace, Marble Arch, St James Park, Hyde Park - memorial to the Royal Artillery [George’s Regiment], 45,000 names. Then we went to the Zoo to see our brothers. Left London for home 5pm, arrived Hellifield 10.30 - tired!

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Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

21 May 1915

LONG PRESTON

A Sad Bereavement - The death of the young is a rare event in this village, but on Monday morning Elsie Butt, the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. Butt, passed away after a few days' illness, at the age of fifteen. The sympathy of the inhabitants for the great grief of the parents and brothers was shown on Wednesday afternoon in the numbers who were present when the remains were interred. The coffin was carried to the Wesleyan Chapel, where the service was read by the lay evangelist, Mr. M. Clegg. Then in a like manner it was taken to the last resting place in the churchyard. The "Dead March" was played on the chapel organ, and two hymns sung. The older scholars from the Endowed Schools attended the burial of their late school-mate, and another hymn was sung at the graveside, after Mr. Clegg had concluded the service. Beautiful wreaths were sent by "Father, mother, and brothers," the Wesleyan Choir (a harp with broken strings), teachers and scholars of the Endowed Schools (a sheaf of flowers), uncle, aunt, and cousins, Leeds; Cousin John and Ethel, Mr. and Mrs. Wills, Mr. and Mrs. Brunskill, Mr. and Mrs. Hindson, "Gladys," cousins at Barnoldswick, Mrs. Hall, Olive, Edith, and Norah, Mrs. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Bentham, Miss Grimshaw, Mrs. Robt. Wilson, Mrs. Popay, The Vicarage children, Dorothy and Lilian, Mrs. Yorke (Halton Place), Mr. and Mrs. Parkington, Mr. and Mrs. Addy.

22 September 1916

BUTT - September 7th, 1916, killed in action in France, Gunner George Butt, of the R.F.A., eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Butt, Main Street, Long Preston, aged 21 years.

22 September 1916

DEATH OF A LONG PRESTON GUNNER - GUNNER GEORGE BUTT

Mr. and Mrs. Butt, Main Street, Long Preston, have received information that their eldest son, George, was killed in a dug-out on the 7th inst. He was 21 years old, joined the R.F.A. in January, and went to France in June. Particulars are given in the annexed letter from Second-Lieut. D, 14 Battery:-

"Dear Mrs. Butt, - I very much regret to tell you your son, Gunner George Butt, met his death in action on September 7th. The Germans shelled the battery heavily, and your son, with several other men, took refuge in a dug-out which was unfortunately blown in. We got to work to dig them out without loss of a moment. Several men exposed themselves (without thinking of their own danger) in hopes of saving their lives. It may comfort you to know that death must have come quickly, and painlessly.

"All the officers and men want me to say how extremely sorry they are to lose a man who was always so cheerful and popular in the Battery, and to express their sympathy with you in the sad bereavement you have suffered. He was buried with proper reverence in a little cemetery under the slope of a hill. I am sending you, in a separate parcel, your son's pocket book, belt, and handkerchief."

A memorial service was held in the Wesleyan Chapel on Sunday afternoon. The Dead March was played on the organ. The Cadet Corps, in charge of Capt. Hetherington and Lieut. Bilton, attended, and Buglers Gregory and Bowness sounded the 'Last Post'.

The flag was at half-mast on the Parish Church tower and at the evening service the Rev. R. Shipman referred to the sympathy which had gone out to the family of the dead soldier. At morning service a fitting sermon was preached by the Rev. A. Ingilby, and the Dead March played.

07 September 1917

BUTT - In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner George Butt, R.F.A., killed in action in France, September 7th 1916.

From his loving Mother and Father, Long Preston.

06 September 1918

BUTT - In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner G. H. Butt (R.F.A.), killed in action September 7th, 1916.
From Father, Mother, and Brothers, Long Preston.

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22 September 1916

A LONG PRESTON GUNNER KILLED

Mr. and Mrs. Butt, Main Street, Long Preston, have received information that their eldest son, George, was killed in a dug-out on the 7th inst. He was 21 years old. He joined the 47th Battery R.F.A. in January, and went to France in June. Particulars are given in the annexed letter from 2nd Lieut. D14 Battery:- "Dear Mrs. Butt, I very much regret to tell you your son, Gunner George Butt, met his death in action on September 7th. The Germans shelled the battery heavily, and your son, with several other men, took refuge in a dug-out which was unfortunately blown in. We got to work to dig them out without loss of a moment, and several men exposed themselves (without thinking of their own danger) in hopes of saving their lives, but it may comfort you to know that death must have come quickly, and painlessly. All the officers and men want me to tell you how extremely sorry they are to lose a man who was always so cheerful and popular in the battery, and to express their sympathy with you in the sad bereavement you have suffered. He was buried with proper reverence in a little cemetery under the slope of a hill. I am sending you, in a separate parcel, your son's pocket book, belt, and handkerchief."

A memorial service was held in the Wesleyan Chapel, Long Preston, on Sunday afternoon. The 'Dead March' was played on the organ. The Cadet Corps, in charge of Capt. Hetherington and Lieut. Bilton, attended, and Buglers Gregory and Bowness sounded the 'Last Post'. The flag was at half-mast on the Parish Church tower. At the evening service Rev. R. Shipman referred to the sympathy which had gone out to the family of the dead soldier. At morning service a fitting sermon was preached by Rev. A. Ingilby, and the 'Dead March' played.

03 August 1917

DEATH OF INGLETON'S OLDEST INHABITANT

By the death of Mrs. Sarah Kilburn, of High Street, Ingleton, has lost its oldest inhabitant. Mrs. Kilburn, who was known as 'Ingleton's grand old lady,' was 84 years of age, and up to two years ago was in excellent health and in possession of all her faculties. For the past two years, however, she had been confined to her bed, but beyond her inability to get about was fairly healthy. She passed away quietly on Tuesday evening. The deceased was predeceased by her husband 18 years ago, he dying at the age of 83 years. Mr. Kilburn was one of the old fashioned schoolmasters and acted in that capacity for 35 years at Chapel-le-dale. He and his wife were also for many years the respected host and hostess at the Station Hotel, Ribblehead, where they also kept a general store and sub-post office. It is some 23 years since they came to reside in Ingleton, during that time the deceased lady took a very active part in parochial work. She was a member of the Ingleton Mothers' Union and worked most assiduously for the Ingleton Literary Institute to clear off the debt owing on that useful building. She was a most ardent church woman and was always first and foremost to assist in any good work in the place. She leaves five married children. Four of the deceased's grandsons have been killed in the war, and six are still on active service.

[Grandmother of Gunner George Henry Butt; Private Wilfred Butt; L/Sergeant Herbert Hewitt and L/Corporal John William Kilburn.]

09 August 1918

Long Preston Family's Second Bereavement

Mr. and Mrs. F. Butt, Main Street, Long Preston, have received the distressing intimation that their son, Pte. Wilfred Butt, West Riding Regiment, died in hospital in France on Aug. 1st. This is the second son they have lost in the war.

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