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James TUDDENHAM

Main CPGW Record

Surname: TUDDENHAM

Forename(s): James

Place of Birth: Rigg, Dumfriesshire, Scotland

Service No: 13727

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 'A' Coy 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1918-04-30

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: Panel 82 to 85.

CWGC Cemetery: ---

CWGC Memorial: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: EARBY, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

James Tuddenham was the son of James and Elizabeth Tuddenham, née Finlayson. James senior was born at Tabley near Knutsford, Cheshire and Elizabeth at Dunblane, Perthshire.

1901 Gretna, Dumfriesshire Census: Crabtree Hall - James Tuddenham, aged 5 years, born Gretna, son of James and Elizabeth Tuddenham.

1911 Earby, Yorkshire Census: 4, Earlham Street - James Tuddenham, aged 15 years, born Gretna, Dumfriesshire. [James was living with his sister, Isabella and brother-in-law John Albert Squires.]

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte James Tuddenham, 13727, West Riding Regiment. Theatre of War first served in: 1 - France. Date of entry therein: 26 August 1915.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: Pte James Tuddenham, 13727, 10th W. Rid. R.; 9th W. Rid. R.; 1/6 W. Rid. R. K in A. 30/4/18. [James served with 'A' Coy 10th W. Rid. R.]

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: Pte James Tuddenham, 13727, 1/6th Bn W. Riding. Date and Place of Death: 30.4.18 France. To whom Authorised/Amount Authorised: Mother and sole legatee - Elizabeth. £25 16s. 9d.

See also:
‘Earby in the First World War’ by Stephanie Carter, published by Earby & District Local History Society (2014).
‘Guiseley Terriers: A Small Part in The Great War - A History of the 1/6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment’ by Stephen Barber (2018).
‘Our Finest Crop’ by Steven Marshall, published by Earby & District Local History Society (2020).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

TREDDENHAM [sic], James, aged 23, West Riding Regiment, formerly of Earby, killed in action April 20, 1918.

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Private James TUDDENHAM

Private James TUDDENHAM

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: TUDDENHAM

Forename(s): James

Born: Rigg, Dumfries

Residence: Carlisle

Enlisted: Skipton, Yorks

Number: 13727

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 1/6th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 30/04/18

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: TUDDENHAM

Forename(s): James

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 13727

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 1st/6th Bn.

Age: 23

Awards:

Died Date: 30/04/1918

Additional Information: Son of James and Elizabeth Tuddenham, of Rockcliffe, Carlisle.

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‘The Westmorland Gazette’ (4 December 1915)

(Kindly supplied by Sedbergh & District History Society)

A SEDBERGH SOLDIER’S DEATH: MEMORIAL SERVICE

Sorrow for the untimely, but heroic, death of Lance-Corpl. Bennett, of the West Riding Regiment, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Bennett of Sedbergh Station, and respect for his bereaved parents and sister, were manifested at the memorial service in the Sedbergh Parish Church on Wednesday afternoon. As already reported, Lance-Corpl. Bennett was shot through the head by a German sniper on the 19th ult., while endeavouring to rescue a wounded comrade and carry him into the trench. The service was largely attended, almost every part of the valley being well represented. The ordinary burial service was used, and the hymns ‘Fight the good fight’ and ‘On the resurrection morning’ were sung, Mr. A.E. Thorne being at the organ. The officiating clergy were the Revs. J. Montague Cadman and H.F.D. Selby. There was a full detachment of Boy Scouts present, and the church flag hung at half-mast. The Rev. J.M. Cadman, vicar, said Lance-Corpl. Bennett was the first of their men whom they knew to have fallen. They grieved over the shutting off of a bright young life, full of promise, brave, cheerful, willing, thoughtful for others, who had endeared himself to his comrades and won the respect of his officers. The qualities which he had showed there as a Boy Scout had developed in degree. The devotion to duty and the self-sacrifice of the dead was a type and self-reflection of the great Self-sacrifice. Therefore they must not sorrow as those who had no hope. A life of full service, however brief, crowned by a death of willing sacrifice, was one which they might envy. At the end of an impressive service, the organist played the ‘Dead March in Saul,’ the congregation standing.

THE TESTIMONY OF COMRADES

Second-Lieut. Harris, A Co. of the 10th Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regt., writing from the trenches to Mrs. Bennett on the 20th November, says: “It is with the deepest regret that I have to tell you of your son Noel’s death. It was yesterday morning that it happened. There was one of our men [Private John Cardwell] out sniping in front of our lines, when the other man out with him returned to tell us he had been hit. When your son heard this, he was out after him, but as where the man lying wounded was in a very exposed position, they saw him, and, poor chap, he was hit through the head, and death was instantaneous. Words of mine are inadequate to you in your terrible loss, but he died like a man and a soldier, trying to rescue a wounded comrade. Your son had been in my platoon ever since he joined the battalion. He was always a good worker and always of good cheer. In him I have lost one of my best men. I shall always remember him as a fearless lad. He was always one of the first to come forward on any work that was at all risky. I myself used always to want him, because he could be relied on. He was most popular with everybody. The chaplain will write and tell you where he is laid to rest. May I take this opportunity of conveying to you, his parents, my deepest sympathy and condolences.” Another letter from a comrade tells how Lance-Corpl. Bennett was buried, he and Capt. [Corpl.] H.L. Mason, another Sedbergh man, being present. A cross has been put on his grave, also his name Noel in small pieces of red brick. He lies next to the man he tried to save. The writer says that less deeds than Noel Bennett’s have been awarded the V.C.–From the chaplain, 21st November, 1915: The Rev. W.L. Henderson, chaplain 69th Field Ambulance, in the course of his letter, says:–Noel Bennett was buried in a little cemetery immediately behind the trenches. A small cross will be put up to the memory of him and the soldier who lies beside him, and the ground for ever kept sacred. The cemetery is in Northern France near the town of Chapelle d’Armentières. Both officers and men joined with him in expressing their deep sympathy. The chaplain goes on to tell Mr. and Mrs. Bennett that their son will be greatly missed by all, but that in their sorrow it will be some comfort to them to know that he died so nobly and that their sorrow is shared by others.–Mr. and Mrs. Bennett have also had letters from Private J. Tuddenham, A Co., 10th W.R. Regt., and also from Corpl. H.L. Mason, of Sedbergh, who expresses his sympathy and then describes how his friend met his death. “He was a good soldier and a good pal, always bright and cheerful even under the most trying conditions. I shall miss him greatly because we have been pals ever since I joined A Company.”–Preaching at the Vale of Lune Chapel on Sunday afternoon, the Rev. H.F.D. Selby said Noel Bennett had fought the good fight and won the eternal crown. All hearts in the parish would go out to his sorrowing parents and sister.

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1937

TUDDENHAM Elizabeth of Rose Cottage Gretna Green Dumfries (wife of James Tuddenham) died 5 February 1937 Administration Carlisle 5 April to the said James Tuddenham retired gamekeeper. Effects £217 5s. 6d.

1948

TUDDENHAM James of 51 Henderson-road Carlisle died 30 March 1948 Probate Carlisle 14 April to Christopher Finlayson Tuddenham departmental under-manager. Effects £186.

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Additional Photo(s) For Soldier Records

Unknown platoon of 'A' Company, 10th (Service) Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment), Aldershot, 1914

Unknown platoon of 'A' Company, 10th (Service) Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment), Aldershot, 1914

Photograph sent home to his parents at Bolton by Bowland by Pte Henry (Harry) Valance Killeen (13738). Henry is standing, with his hands behind his back, 11th from right. His brother, Pte Reginald Victor Whiteley Killeen (q.v.), was killed in action on the 25 January 1916

Courtesy of Paula Ann Payne (née Bailey), Barnoldswick

'A' Company, 10th (Service) Battalion The Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), Bramshott, August, 1915

'A' Company, 10th (Service) Battalion The Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), Bramshott, August, 1915

Courtesy of Bernard Ideson

Names of identified officers and other ranks on above photograph

Names of identified officers and other ranks on above photograph

View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

21 July 1916

EARBY CASUALTIES

Pte. James Tuddnam, 10th Duke of Wellington’s, who lodged at 72, Water Street, and worked at Grove Shed as a weaver, has been wounded and is now in hospital at Bradford.

24 May 1918

Private J. Tuddenham, Earby

Private James Tuddenham, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, killed in action April 30th, was 23 years of age and a native of Cumberland, but had lived in Earby for the past ten years. He enlisted in August, 1914, and had been previously wounded. Before joining up he was a weaver at Grove Shed (Messrs. R. Nutter and Co.’s.), Earby.

31 May 1918

Private J. Tuddenham, Earby

The death in action of Private James Tuddenham, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, son of Mr. Tuddenham, 18 Cemetery Road, Earby, briefly announced in our last week’s issue, is the subject of a letter from the O.C., ‘A’ Company (Lieut. H.E. Lowther) who says:– “He was killed by a shell in the early morning of April 30th and can have suffered no pain whatever. He was buried with two of his comrades, and the grave was marked by a cross made by the men of his own platoon. He was one of our company stretcher bearers who are always men picked specially for their bravery. He always did the job well, however dangerous the circumstances, and always thought of the wounded men he tended before himself. I know how hard it will be for you, but I want you to realise how deeply we feel his loss. ‘A’ Company will never forget ‘Tudd’, as he was known to everyone.

07 June 1918

TUDDENHAM – In affectionate remembrance of Private J. Tuddenham, killed in action April 30th, aged 28 years.

Too far away for sight or speech,
But not too far away for thoughts to reach.

Ever remembered by his sweetheart Mary and all at Cemetery Road, Earby.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

21 July 1916

EARBY CASUALTIES

Pte. James Tuddnam, 10th Duke of Wellington’s, who lodged at 72, Water Street, and worked at Grove Shed, as a weaver, has been wounded, and is now in hospital at Bradford.

24 May 1918

TREDDENHAM [sic] – Killed in action, April 30th, Private James Treddenham, West Riding Regiment, late of Earby, aged 23.

24 May 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Pte. J. Treddenham [sic], Earby

Pte. James Treddenham, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, killed in action on April 30th, was 23 years of age, and a native of Cumberland, but had lived in Earby for the past ten years. He enlisted in August, 1914, and had been previously wounded. Before joining up he was a weaver at Grove Shed (Messrs. B. Nutter and Co’s.), Earby.

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