Top Navigation

Wilfred HOLMES (1)

Main CPGW Record

Surname: HOLMES

Forename(s): Wilfred

Place of Birth: Addingham, Yorkshire

Service No: 10990

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 8th (Service) Battalion

Division: 11th (Northern) Division

Age: 20

Date of Death: 1917-04-27

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: D. 6.

CWGC Cemetery: HERMIES BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: ADDINGHAM, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: BARNOLDSWICK, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Wilfred Holmes was the son of William and Sarah Ann Elizabeth Holmes, née Walls. William was born at Pateley Bridge and Sarah at Leeds, Yorkshire. Wilfred was the brother-in-law of Pioneer Elijah Sutcliffe (WR/25667) (q.v.).

1901 Addingham, Yorkshire Census: Back Beck - Wilfred Holmes, aged 4 years, born Addingham, son of William and Sarah A.E. Holmes.

1911 Addingham, Yorkshire Census: 25, Southfield Terrace - Wilfred Holmes, aged 14 years, born Addingham, son of Sarah Holmes, widow.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Wilfred Holmes, 10990, W. Rid. R. Theatre of War first served in: (2B) Balkans. Date of entry therein: 7.7.15. Died 27.4.17.

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: Pte Wilfred Holmes. 10990, 8th W. Rid. R. K. in A. 27.4.17.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: Pte Wilfred Holmes, 10990, 8th Bn W. Riding. Date and Place of Death: 27.4.17 France. To whom Authorised/Amount Authorised: Mother and Sole Legatee - Sarah A.E. £21 12s. 10d.

A short biography of Wilfred is included in: ‘Barnoldswick - A small Town’s part in conflicts 1800 to 2014’ by Peter Ian Thompson (2014).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

HOLMES, Wilfred, aged 20 years, West Riding Regiment, son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes of Addingham and Mrs. Holmes of Lower Brook Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action April 27, 1917.

---

Click the thumbnail below to view a larger image.

Private Wilfred HOLMES

Private Wilfred HOLMES

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 11th (Northern) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 11th (Northern) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HOLMES

Forename(s): Wilfred

Born: Addingham, Yorks

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorks

Enlisted: Skipton, Yorks

Number: 10990

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 8th Battalion

Decorations:

Died Date: 27/04/17

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HOLMES

Forename(s): Wilfred

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 10990

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 8th Bn.

Age: 20

Awards:

Died Date: 27/04/1917

Additional Information: Son of William and Sarah Ann Elizabeth Holmes, of Addingham, Ilkley, Yorks. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: PRO PATRIA)

View Additional Text

View Additional Text For Soldier Records

'Ilkley Gazette' (16 June 1916)

Addingham News – Letters from Soldiers

Wilfred Holmes, in a letter to Mr. C. Flint, from France acknowledging a parcel says – We are having lovely weather out here and it makes a lot of difference. It is bad enough being in the trenches when it is fine. I spent all my Easter above the knees in mud and water, quite a change from Egypt. I called to see Jack England on my way to the trenches and back. He has not been in yet, but he has had a few shells burst near where he works the other day and he and Wilkinson were very lucky to escape. We have a fairly easy time when not in the trenches, we have a band concert every night and it just keeps us alive but we cannot help feeling a bit fed up sometimes. I wish it would come to an end before many more lives are lost.

'Ilkley Gazette' (14 July 1916)

Private Wilfred Holmes whose wife and child live at 4 Railway View, Addingham is believed to be missing, he was orderly to Captain Allen Clough who has been reported missing. Holmes who is 20 years of age was before the war employed by Messrs. D. Illingworth and Son of Bradford

'Ilkley Gazette' (13 October 1916)

German Chained to a Machine Gun

Private Wilfred Holmes of Addingham before going to the Western Front served with one of the West Riding Battalions at Suvla Bay, in a letter to his sister at Addingham he mentions that he had taken part in a good deal of fighting on the Somme and had experienced a terrible time. “When we got over the top of the parapet” he says “it seemed impossible to live in such a fire but the few of us that did get through routed the Bosches out of their dug-outs. They were glad to be taken prisoner. I saw a couple of them get killed. They were chained to a machine gun”.

---

View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

17 September 1915

BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES IN GALLIPOLI

In a letter to his mother, Mrs. Holmes, 20, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, Private Wilfred Holmes, ‘Z’ Company, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, writes:– “Just a few lines hoping you are in the best of health, as it leaves me at present. Excuse writing paper, as we cannot get any more here. We have now been out here in this hell for nearly three weeks, and are just longing for a good rest out of reach of shells and bullets. Our division have lost terribly heavy. There are only about 800 of our regiment left now all told, and one officer. I am not going to tell you anything of what I have seen, but I have seen what I never wish to see again. I saw Harry Hayes go down the trench the other day. (Hayes lived at 41, Wellington Street). He had been hit in the thigh by the look of him. He said “It has nearly broken me in two.” Eddie Bottomley got wounded on the jaw, and Hartley Dent, another Barlicker, got killed. He was a stretcher bearer, I think. A parcel would be a treat. I have not received a letter or anything yet, and home is our whole study.”

22 October 1915

BARNOLDSWICK – PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS IN THE DARDANELLES

Complaints have been rife for some time past in regard to the non-delivery of parcels sent out to soldiers in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. A case was brought to our notice a day or two ago where a quantity of seasonable luxuries, including cake, cigarettes and other articles representing a value of 10 shillings, all securely packed in a biscuit tin, was sent to a Barnoldswick soldier at the end of July. With the object of making delivery doubly sure, the consignee was advised of its despatch by registered letter, which, together with an additional half crown for postage, makes it rather an expensive matter for the senders. The fact that neither the registered letter nor the parcel had been received up to the date of his last letter suggests that the good things have fallen into hands for which they were not destined. Happily, this is not often the case.

Pte. Wilfred Holmes, of the ‘Z’ Company of the Duke of Wellington’s in the Dardanelles, writing to his mother at 20, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, says:– “Just a line to let you know I am still keeping going. We are now in the reserve trenches, and they give us a few shells now and again. We have had six days in the firing line. The last day we were in the Turks got the range with some of their guns and blew the front of the trench in right where I was. One fellow had his collarbone broken, another his leg broken, and another got hit in the head. You should have seen us sorting ourselves out of the earth and sandbags. I received the parcel from ----- and it was all right up to the mark. I see from the paper that a lot of our fellows have got home with their wounds.”

12 November 1915

ADDINGHAM – The Turk a Fair Fighter

Wilfred Holmes writes [to Mr. Flint. of Addingham] from Egypt:–

“Just a few lines to let you know I received parcel. We had a very hot time of it when we made this new landing here, and for the first three weeks we never seemed to be out of it, but the last six weeks it has been quieter–a little dust up now and again to let us know they were still there. We must give the Turk his due; he is a good and fair fighter. There are hundreds of wells they could have poisoned if they had so wished, but they kept a good watch over them, so that if you wanted water you had to run risks to get it.”

11 February 1916

BARNOLDSWICK

Private Wilfred Holmes of the 8th Duke of Wellington’s writes to his mother (20 Wellington Street):– "Just a few lines to let you know that I am still in the best of health. We could not write letters for the last few weeks, we were on the Peninsula. Now we are on an island about 15 miles from Suvla. There are only about 40 of old 8th who have not been wounded.”

11 May 1917

HOLMES – April 27th 1917, killed in action in France, Pte. Wilfred Holmes, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, youngest son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes, stonemason, of Addingham, and Mrs. Holmes, Lower Rook Street, Barnoldswick, aged 20 years.

11 May 1917

ADDINGHAM – PRIVATE WILFRED HOLMES

Pte. Wilfred Holmes, Duke of Wellington’s, who has been reported killed in action in France on the 27th ult., was the youngest son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes, stonemason, of Addingham, and Mrs. Holmes, Lower Rook Street, Barnoldswick. Though only 20 years of age, Pte. Holmes had been in the Army close upon three years, having enlisted in September 1914. His first experience of actual warfare was gained in Gallipoli, where he landed with the 29th Division at Suvla Bay, going through that disastrous campaign unscathed, although his battalion was reduced to a mere handful of men. After the evacuation he spent some time at Mudros and in Egypt, being drafted out to France in December last.

In a letter of condolence to the bereaved family, Sec.-Lieut. J. P. Sugden writes:– “He was one of our best lads, loved by everyone in the Co., and we mourn the loss of a brave soldier and a good comrade. On behalf of the officers, N.C.O.s and men of the Company I beg to tender my sincere sympathy in your bereavement.”

Mrs. Holmes has another son and a son-in-law in France.

25 May 1917

ADDINGHAM – SOLDIERS LETTERS

Mr. Flint has received letters in acknowledgment of parcels sent out.

Pte. Harry Spencer writes:– “We are in reserve now and we shall be going up again in a few days to have another pop at Fritz. Sorry to hear that Wilf. Holmes has been wounded. I am going to his Company to get the right news. I have got to know that he died from gun-shot wounds in his side.”

01 June 1917

BARNOLDSWICK – THE LATE PRIVATE WILFRED HOLMES – An Officer’s Tribute

Mrs. Holmes, 53, Lower Rook Street, Barnoldswick, has received the following letter from Capt. H.G. Griffin, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, in reference to the death of her son, Private Wilfred Holmes, who was killed in France on the 27th April:–

Empress Eugenie’s Hospital,
Farnborough,
22nd May, 1917.

“Dear Mrs. Holmes, – I have not been allowed to write before, as I was wounded in the head a day or two before your son was killed. As, however, I was for some months his Company commander, I would like to write to you with regard to him. I myself sent in his recommendation for the Military Medal for his gallantry at Stuff Redoubt, and was very sorry he did not receive it, especially as I forwarded it as a result of a vote from the whole Company. He was chosen by the other men, which is a real honour, and in their opinion and in mine deserved the medal. I had also promised to make him a non-commissioned officer at the first vacancy. You will understand, therefore, how very sorry I am that he was killed. He was a brave lad, a gallant soldier, and a credit to the regiment, which will miss him. You have my very real sympathy. – Yours sincerely, H.G. GRIFFIN, Captain”

Pte. Holmes enlisted directly after the outbreak of war, and was 20 years of age. He took part in the Dardanelles campaign, being with the 20th Division at Suvla Bay landing. A letter received from a comrade (Pte. Ennie Bottomley) states that Pte. Holmes was working with the R.E.s cutting trees down when he met his death. It was nearly dark when a machine gun was turned on them and Wilfred got a German bullet in his left side. “He was well liked in the Battalion, and was my best pal. He was buried as soon as possible, along with ten more of our battalion. He has done his bit, having been through every battle we have been through.”

26 April 1918

HOLMES – In loving memory of Private Wilfred Holmes, who was killed in action in France April 27th, 1917.

It may be a soldier’s honour
For his country’s sake to fall;
But we who feel the sorrow
Don’t think of the glory at all.

From his loving Mother, Sister and Brothers, 16 York Street, Barnoldswick.

HOLMES – In loving memory of Private Wilfred Holmes, who was killed in action in France April 27th, 1917.

Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off land,
A place we may never see;
So long as life and memory last,
We will remember thee.

From his loving Sister and Brother-in-law, Jane and John (on active service), Middle Nook, Wadsworth.

HOLMES – In loving memory of our dear brother, Wilfred Holmes, aged 20, of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who was killed in action at Hermies, April 27th, 1917.

“Gone home to God from earth’s battlefields.”

Ever remembered by his Sister at Silsden, and Brother-in-law in France.

25 April 1919

HOLMES – In loving memory of Private Wilfred Holmes, killed in France April 27th, 1917.

Like ivy on a weathered oak,
When all things else decay;
Our love for him shall still keep green
And never fade away.

From his loving Sister and Brother, Middle Nook, Wadsworth.

HOLMES – In loving memory of Private Wilfred Holmes, killed in France April 27th, 1917.

In the bloom of his youth death claimed him,
In the pride of his manhood days;
None knew him but to love him,
None mention his name but with praise.

From his loving brother and Sister, Nook Farm, Wadsworth.

HOLMES – In loving memory of my dear brother, Private W. Holmes, aged 20 years, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who was killed in action in France, April 27th, 1917.

Also of our dear husband and daddy, Private E. Sutcliffe, aged 34 years, of the Royal Engineers, who died of pneumonia in Belgium, February 12th, 1919.

“Until the day breaks.”

From A. Sutcliffe and Children, Silsden.

HOLMES – In loving memory of a dear son and brother, Private Wilfred Holmes, 8th Duke of Wellington’s, who was killed in action at Hermies, France, April 27th, 1917.

“Their name liveth evermore.”

Ever remembered by his Mother and Sisters, 20 Wellington Street, Barnoldswick.

23 April 1920

HOLMES – In loving memory of Wilfred Holmes, killed in France April 27th, 1917.

Over the distance in a hallowed acre,
Where wooden crosses mark the simple mounds,
Quite unadorned except by trailing mosses,
They sleep at last where quiet rest abounds,
Where silent stars their vigil keep
He giveth his beloved sleep.

Always remembered by Mother and Sisters, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

22 October 1915

PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS IN THE DARDANELLES

Complaints have been received for some time past in regard to the non-delivery of parcels sent out to soldiers in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. A case brought to our notice a day or two ago where a quantity of seasonal luxuries, including cake, cigarettes and other articles representing a value of 10s., all securely packed in a biscuit tin, was sent to a Barnoldswick soldier at the end of July. With the object of making delivery doubly sure the consignee was advised of its despatch by registered letter which, together with an additional half-crown for postage, makes it rather an expensive matter for the sender. The fact that neither the registered letter nor the parcel had been received up to the date of his last letter, suggests that the good things have fallen into hands for which they were not destined. Happily this is not often the case.

Private Wilfred Holmes, of the ‘Z’ Company, Duke of Wellington’s, in the Dardanelles, writing to his mother at 20 Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, says:– “Just a line to let you know I am still keeping going. We are now in the reserve trenches, and they give us a few shells now and again. We have had six days in the firing line. The last day we were in the Turks got the range with some of their guns and blew the front of the trench in right where I was. One fellow had his collarbone broken, another his leg broken and another got hit in the head. You should have seen us sorting ourselves out of the earth and sandbags. I received the parcel from ----- and it was all right – up to the mark. I see from the paper that a lot of our fellows have got home with their wounds.

12 November 1915

ADDINGHAM

Mr. Flint, of Addingham has received the following letters in acknowledgement of parcels sent out:–

Wilfred Holmes writes from Egypt:– Just a few lines to let you know I received parcel. We had a very hot time of it when we made this new landing here, and for the first three weeks we never seemed to be out of it, a little dust up now and again to let us know they were still there. We must give the Turk his due. He is a good and fair fighter. There are hundreds of wells. They could have poisoned if they had so wished, but they kept a good watch over them, so that if you wanted water you had to run risks to get it.

06 October 1916

ADDINGHAM SOLDIERS’ LETTERS

Mr. Flint has received the following letters in acknowledgement of parcels sent out:–

Pte. Wilfred Holmes, writing to his sister, says:– “I have seen a few Addingham lads out here lately. We were over the top in action a few days ago, and our company went for the front line. When we got over it seemed impossible to live in such a fire, but the few of us who did get there routed the Bosch out of their dug-outs. They were glad to be taken prisoners. I saw a couple killed who were chained to a machine gun.” Holmes was in at the landing and evacuation of Suvla Bay. He has been on active service since July 2nd 1915. His only brother is in hospital, having been invalided from the Front.

11 May 1917

HOLMES – Killed in action in France, April 27th, Pte. Wilfred Holmes, of the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes, of Addingham, and Mrs. Holmes, of Lower Brook Street, Barnoldswick, aged 20 years.

11 May 1917

BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES

Pte. Wilfred Holmes, of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who has been reported killed in action in France on the 27th ult., was the youngest son of, the late Mr. Wm. Holmes, stonemason, of Addingham, and Mrs. Holmes, Lower Brook Street, Barnoldswick. Though only 20, years of age, Pte. Holmes had been in the army close upon three years haying enlisted in September, 1914. His first experience of actual warfare was gained in Gallipoli, where he landed with the 29th Division at Suvla Bay, going through that disastrous campaign unscathed, although his battalion was reduced to a mere handful of men. After the evacuation he spent some time at Mudros and in Egypt, being drafted out to France in December last. In a letter of condolence to the bereaved family Sergt. J.P. Sugden writes:– “He was one of our best lads, loved by everyone in the Company, and we mourn the loss of a brave soldier and a good comrade. On behalf of the officers, N.C.O.’s men of this Company I beg to tender my sincere sympathy in your bereavement.” Mrs. Holmes has another son and a son-in-law in France.

25 May 1917

ADDINGHAM SOLDIERS LETTERS

Mr. Flint has received the following letters in acknowledgement of parcels sent out:–

Pte. Harry Spencer writes:– Thanks for parcel. We are having some lovely weather at present and very hot, too; we can well do with it to keep our appetites from getting too high for these big dinners. We are in reserve just now, and we shall be going up again in a few days to have another pop at Fritz. Sorry to hear that Wilf. Holmes has been wounded. I am going to his company to get the right news. I have got to know that he died from gun-shot wounds in his side.

01 June 1917

THE LATE PTE. WILFRED HOLMES – An Officer’s Tribute

Mrs. Holmes, 53, Lower Rook Street, Barnoldswick, had received the following letter from Capt. H. G. Griffin, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, in reference to the death of her son, Pte. Wilfred Holmes, who was killed in France on the 27th of April: -

Empress Eugenie’s Hospital, Farnborough, 22nd May, 1917.

“Dear Mrs. Holmes, – “I have not been allowed to write before, as I was wounded in the hand a day or two before your son was killed. As, however, I was for some months, his Company Commander I would like to write to you with regard to him. I myself sent in his recommendation for the Military Medal for his gallantry at Stuff Redoubt, and was very sorry he did not receive it, especially as I forwarded it as a result of a vote from the whole company. He was chosen by the other men, which is a real honour, and in their opinion and in mine deserved the medal. I had also promised to make him a non-commissioned officer at the first vacancy. You will understand therefore how very sorry I am that he was killed. He was a brave lad, a gallant soldier and a credit to the regiment which will miss him. You have my very real sympathy. Yours sincerely, H.G. Griffin, Capt.”

Pte. Holmes enlisted directly after the outbreak of war, and was 20 year of age. He took part in the Dardanelles campaign, being with the 29th Division at Suvla Bay landing. A letter received from a comrade (Pte. Eddie Bottomley), states that Pte. Holmes was working with the Royal Engineers cutting trees down when he meet his death. “It was nearly dark when a machine gun was turned on them, and Wilfred got a German bullet in his left side. He was well liked in the battalion. and was my best pal. He was buried as soon as possible along with ten more of our battalion. He has done his bit, having been through every battle we have been through.”

Submit a Correction

    Name (required)

    Email Address (required)

    Telephone (required)

    Soldier Reference - Name:

    Soldier Reference - URL:

    Details of the correction to be made (required)

    Comment on this Soldier Record

    You can leave comments on this soldier record. Please note all comments will be manually approved before they appear on the website.

    One Response to Wilfred HOLMES (1)

    1. Anne Suddards November 10, 2018 at 11:37 pm #

      This soldiers photo is currently in the window of our friends Madeleine and Philip Nichols who currently live at 25, Southfield Terrace, Addingham, in remembrance of him. This was given to them by Addingham primary school who had been doing some research for the 100th Anniversary of ww1Lest we forget and RIP to Wilfred Holmes who was only a young kid when he died. God bless him.

    Leave a Reply

    Pin It on Pinterest

    Share This