Top Navigation

Cedric Fawcett HORSFALL

Main CPGW Record

Surname: HORSFALL

Forename(s): Cedric Fawcett

Place of Birth: Crosshills, Yorkshire

Service No: ---

Rank: Captain

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 26

Date of Death: 1916-09-18

Awards: ---

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: I. G. 8.

CWGC Cemetery: BLIGHTY VALLEY CEMETERY, AUTHUILLE WOOD

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: CROSSHILLS, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: KILDWICK, YORKSHIRE

Local War Memorial: SUTTON-IN-CRAVEN, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

Cedric Fawcett Horsfall was the son of John Cousin and Sarah Emily Horsfall, née Fawcett. John was born at Hebden Bridge and Sarah at Brearley, Yorkshire.

1891 Glusburn, Yorkshire Census: Hayfield - Cedric F. Horsfall, aged 1 year, born Crosshills, Yorkshire, son of John C. and Sarah E. Horsfall.

1901 Westgate-on-Sea, Kent Census: Streete Court - Cedric F. Horsfall, aged 11 years, born Keighley, Yorkshire. Scholar. [Cedric's younger brother, John D. Horsfall, was also a scholar there at the same time.]

1911 Newton Abbott, Devon Census: Middlecott, Ilsington - Cedric Fawcett Horsfall, aged 21 years, born Keighley, Yorkshire. University Student. [Cedric was boarding with Thomas Henry Lyon, Architect.]

Cedric was married to Doris May Sutcliffe in 1915.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: T/Capt Cedric Fawcett Horsfall, 1/6th West Riding Regiment. Theatre of War first served in: 1 - France. Date of entry therein: 14 April 1915. Correspondence: Mrs. D.M. Horsfall applies for her late husbands 1914-15 Star. Address: Clifton York. Present address: 42, Loudoun Road, St John's Wood, N.W.8. Permanent address: Hayfield, Crosshills, nr. Keighley, Yorks.

Cedric is in the photograph of officers in CPGW book (page 44).

Cedric is commemorated on Cambridge University, King's College War Memorial.

See also: ‘Guiseley Terriers: A Small Part in The Great War - A History of the 1/6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment’ by Stephen Barber (2018).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

HORSFALL, Captain Cedric F., [Sutton], West Riding Regiment, son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, Hayfield, Glusburn, killed in action, France, Dec. 1916.

---

Click the thumbnail below to view a larger image.

Captain Cedric Fawcett HORSFALL

Captain Cedric Fawcett HORSFALL

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HORSFALL

Forename(s): Cedric Fawcett

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted:

Number:

Rank: Capt

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 6th Battalion (Territorial)

Decorations:

Died Date: 18/09/16

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War:

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: HORSFALL

Forename(s): Cedric Fawcett

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number:

Rank: Captain

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 6th Bn.

Age: 26

Awards:

Died Date: 19/09/1916

Additional Information: Son of Sir John C. Horsfall, Bart., and Lady Horsfall, of Glusburn, Yorks.; husband of Doris May Horsfall, of 42, Loudoun Rd., St. John's Wood, London. (CWGC Headstone Personal Inscription: I HAVE FOUGHT A GOOD FIGHT I HAVE KEPT MY FAITH)

View Additional Text

View Additional Text For Soldier Records

England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966

1917

HORSFALL Cedric Fawcett of Hayfield Crosshills near Keighley Yorkshire temporary captain 6th Duke of Wellington regiment died 18 September 1916 in France on active service Probate London 2 February to John Donald Horsfall worsted spinner and Norman Dixon Walker bobbin manufacturer. Effects £24956 13s. 4d.

View Additional Image(s)

Additional Photo(s) For Soldier Records

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

ROLL CALL OF THE SKIPTON DIVISION LIBERAL & CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATIONS, August 4th 1914 - August 4th 1916

Entry on Page 23

Blighty Valley Cemetery, Authuille Wood

Blighty Valley Cemetery, Authuille Wood

CWGC Headstone

Blighty Valley Cemetery, Authuille Wood

Blighty Valley Cemetery, Authuille Wood

CWGC Headstone - personal inscription

View Craven Herald Articles

View Craven Herald Articles

Craven Herald and Wensleydale Standard Logo

30 July 1915

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Private Arthur Smith, age 21, of the 6th West Riding Regiment (T), who formerly lived with his parents at 29, Bar Lane, Stockbridge, Keighley, has been killed at the Front. The information was received by his parents in a letter from Captain A. B. Clarkson, and letters have also been received from Lieutenants C. Horsfall and D. F. Peacock.

17 September 1915

GLUSBURN – Lieut. Cedric Horsfall Wounded

An intimation has been received at Glusburn that Lieut. Cedric F. Horsfall, of the 1st Battalion of the 6th Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, the elder son of Sir John C. Horsfall, Bart., Hayfield, Glusburn, has been wounded whilst in the trenches at the Front in France. The wound, which is in the jaw, was caused by a piece of shrapnel, but it is understood that it is only a slight one, and not of any serious nature.

29 October 1915

LIEUTENANT CEDRIC HORSFALL WOUNDED

Lieutenant Cedric F. Horsfall, the elder son of Sir John C. Horsfall, Bart., and Lady Horsfall, of Hayfield, Glusburn, has been wounded whilst fighting in France. Sir John and Lady Horsfall, who are at present at Blackpool, where Sir John is recuperating after his recent operation, received a telegram last weekend, and telephoned the news to Hayfield. The wounds were caused by fragments of shrapnel and are not of a serious character. This is the second time Lieutenant Horsfall has been wounded, the wounds on each occasion being caused by shrapnel bullets.

26 November 1915

MARRIAGE OF LIEUT. CEDRIC HORSFALL

At St. John’s Parish Church, Buxton, on Wednesday, the wedding took place of Lieutenant Cedric T. Horsfall, of the First 6th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, elder son of Sir John Horsfall, Bart., and Lady Horsfall, of Hayfield, Crosshills, and Miss Doris May Sutcliffe, daughter of Mr. and Mr. W. T. Sutcliffe, Pendle, Lightwood Road, Buxton. The officiating clergyman was the Vicar of Buxton (Canon Scott-Moncrieff). The ‘best man’ was Captain J. D. Horsfall, of the First 6th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, brother of the bridegroom, and the bride, who was attended by one bridesmaid, Miss Kathleen Horsfall (sister of the bridegroom), was given away by her father. Lieutenant Horsfall and his bride left later for the South Coast for the honeymoon. The bride’s travelling dress was navy blue and black taffeta, and she wore a musquash and skunk coat. The employees of Messrs. John C. Horsfall and Sons, Hayfield Mills, Glusburn, have presented Lieutenant Cedric F. Horsfall, a partner in the firm, with a grandfather clock with Westminster chimes and a set of pipes.

26 November 1915

HORSFALL – SUTCLIFFE

November 24th, at St. John’s Parish Church, Buxton, by Canon Scott-Moncrieff, Cedric Fawcett Horsfall, Lieut. 6th Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, elder son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, of Hayfield, Crosshills, near Keighley, to Doris May, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Sutcliffe, of Pendle, Buxton.

29 September 1916

HORSFALL – Killed in action, September 18th, 1916, aged 26 years, Captain Cedric Fawcett Horsfall, Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, elder son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, Hayfield, Crosshills, Keighley, and dear husband of Doris May Horsfall.

29 September 1916

CAPTAIN CEDRIC HORSFALL DIES IN ACTION

We regret to record the death in action in France of Captain Cedric F. Horsfall, of the West Riding Regiment, the eldest son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, of Hayfield, Glusburn. The information reached the family yesterday week, September 21st, from the Record Office at York, but beyond the fact that the sad event took place on September 18th, no details were to hand.

Captain Horsfall, who was a popular figure in this part of Craven, and highly respected for his many sterling and solid qualities, joined the Army at the outbreak of hostilities. Prior to doing so he was in partnership with his father at Hayfield Mills, and in this connection had a large circle of business acquaintances in the West Riding. When his Regiment went to the Front, the deceased was Second-Lieutenant. A few months’ service gained him his captaincy, but not before he had been wounded twice.
It was in May this year that he returned to active service. He was a most efficient officer and very popular with his men; was endowed with great physical strength; and had no fear of danger. One instance of his character may be given. It is the testimony of Major Cass, a fellow officer who knew the deceased officer intimately:–

“One night we were crossing the border to ----- [censored], at the end of a fourteen miles march. Many of his men were exhausted, and he finished up the last two or three miles by carrying two or three rifles and men’s equipment. He was an exceedingly fine young fellow.”

It is only a fortnight ago since we produced in the ‘Craven Herald’ a letter from Captain Horsfall, written from the trenches, to the annual meeting of the Craven Association of Village Institutes, of whom he was the retiring president, and after a pressing admiration for the work of the Association, and promising that after the war it should have his active support, Captain Horsfall said:–

“I hope it is not out of place if I add a word of admiration for the men of this Battalion, many of whom have come to the Front from our villages, and most have been members of the various institutes. They have not had an easy time lately, but they seem to thrive on work and do it with a good heart, and shelling hardly disturbs them at all.”

Up to joining the Forces he had taken a deep interest in politics, and had often presided at Liberal meetings in the Crosshills district. He was a member of the Sutton Baptist Church, and was 26 years of age.

Captain Horsfall married at Buxton, in November 1915, Miss Doris May Sutcliffe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sutcliffe, Pendle, Lightwood Road, Burton.

MR. J. W. MORKILL’S TRIBUTE

Prior to commencing the business of the Skipton Petty Sessions on Saturday morning, the Chairman (Mr. J. W. Morkill) said he felt he was expressing the feelings of everyone in the hall, and in the town of Skipton and neighbourhood, when he said that the sad news of the death of Captain Cedric Horsfall, which had been announced the previous evening, had been received with profound regret and sorrow. Captain Horsfall was a man who at the University had a distinguished career. He came back from the University to his home and there took an interest in the welfare of the people in the neighbourhood. He was a great help in many ways and also had a keen interest in the Boy Scout movement, with which the name of Anthony Slingsby had been so closely associated. At the call of his country, Captain Horsfall went out to France. “It was only yesterday,” continued Mr. Morkill, “that I happened to meet Colonel Birkbeck, who was his commanding officer for many months in France. Neither of us knew at the time that Captain Horsfall was killed. Colonel Birkbeck was loud in his praise of young Horsfall and described him as a valiant soldier, a man of resource, and a level-headed man who could be thoroughly trusted.”

“Such a man,” added Mr. Morkill, “could ill be spared, but we can say of him that he lived the life and died the death of an honourable English gentleman. His father, Sir John Horsefall, we all know well. He has held a leading position in this County and neighbourhood for many years; and to-day he is the senior member of this Bench and has often presided in the seat I occupy to-day. We wish to express to-day our sympathy with him and Lady Horsfall in the terrible loss they have sustained, not forgetting the young wife of Captain Horsfall, to whom especially our sympathy goes out.”

Our Crosshills Correspondent Writes:–

Captain Horsfall was the eldest child of Sir John Horsfall by his second marriage. He wad educated at Uppingham School, afterwards going to King’s College, Cambridge, and whilst there obtaining his degree of M.A. On leaving college he entered his father’s business at Hayfield Mills, afterwards becoming a partner in the firm. Captain Horsfall took an active interest in politics and great things were expected of him in this direction. He was also greatly interested in educational work, and was a member of the General Council at the Glusburn Technical Institute, and also member of the Science and Art Committee. At the outbreak of war he was president of the Craven Association of Village Institutes. Since joining the forces, Captain Horsfall became a member of the Sutton Baptist Church, in which Church all the members of the family take a most active interest. Captain Horsfall had officiated as Chairman at several public gatherings at the Church, and had also given lectures to the Young Men’s Bible Class and the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Society. He had been wounded twice previously and had also been buried by a ‘Jack Johnson,’ having to be dug out by his men on the latter occasion. His men almost worshipped him, and abundant testimonies are forthcoming of his care for the men under his charge, and the high regard in which they held him. Capt. Horsfall was a worthy son of a worthy sire, and his loss is deeply felt throughout the district. He was married in November 1915 to Miss Doris M. Sutcliffe, of Buxton.

The flag at Hayfield Mills has been flown at half-mast during the week.

06 October 1916

THE LATE CAPTAIN CEDRIC F. HORSFALL – MEMORIAL SERVICE

A service in memory of the late Captain Cedric F. Horsfall, son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, Hayfield, Glusburn, who was killed in France on the 18th September, was held on Sunday morning in the Sutton Baptist Church. The large chapel was crowded, and amongst those present were Mrs. Cedric Horsfall, the Mayor of Keighley (Mr. W. A. Brigg), with his mace bearer; Sir John and Lady Horsfall, Miss Horsfall, Miss Dora Horsfall, Miss C. Horsfall, Mrs. Norman Walker, Captain and Mrs. J. Donald Horsfall, Mrs. Curry, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Petty, Mr. Tom Spencer (Lyndhurst), Mr. Peter Smith, M.P., Mr. W. E. Foster (Keighley), Major C. P Case, Captain Ray Marriner, Mr. John Clough, Mr. F. J. Wilson, Mr. James Woodrow, and Mr. Edgar Naylor.

At the commencement of the service the organist (Mr. Joseph Petty) played ‘O rest in the Lord’, and at the conclusion of the service the Dead March in ‘Saul’ was played, the congregation standing whilst it was being played. The choir, conducted by Mr. Joseph Overend, sang the anthem ‘There is a Land’. The service was opened by the singing of ‘O God our help in ages past’.

The preacher was the pastor (Rev. F. W. Pollard) who said it was nearly a year since the memorial service for Private Joseph Bancroft was held. He was killed in the trenches on October 23rd last year. Fred Simpson and Walter Haggas had been reported missing and no further news had yet been received concerning their fate. Percy Stell and Stanley Archibald, who went through the Gallipoli campaign, were also reported missing. Tom Summersgill, a boy who used to attend the Junior Endeavour Society and the Band of Hope, was killed in July, and now the awful shadow of death again rests upon them, and again they were realising how terrible were the sacrifices the war. The glamour of war was now gone. The fateful week that brought the news of the death of Captain Horsfall would long be remembered for its records of the loss our country sustained of men of special prominence, highly gifted, and with the promise of useful and glorious careers. Raymond Asquith, Captain Henderson and the son of the Rt. Hon. Pike Pease were killed during that week, and the tragedy of those losses was emphasised when news came of the death of Captain Cedric Horsfall. He was indeed worthy to take his place with the best of those who had fallen, by virtue of his noble character and attainments, and by the rich promise of his life. There was in his character much which marked him out for future service in the neighbourhood, in the county and in the country. His education was crowned by his winning highest honours at Cambridge University. He was a true gentleman, the very perfection of kindly consideration for others. They also mourned the death of two others, Lance-Corporal Lewis Binns and Private Albert Binns, both of Glusburn. The first was killed in action on the 11th September. Albert Binns had died during the week as a result of wounds received in action. These men had fallen in defence of their country and its noble ideals, in defence of the cause of freedom and justice, honour and truth. The quarrel thrust upon them was not of their seeking. Their friend, Captain Horsfall, volunteered his services in the very early days of the war. There were many reasons why he might have declined the call home for business considerations; but a noble spirit of chivalry determined him to make the greater choice, and the appeal that came to him in the hour of his country’s need met with a noble one. They must see to it that these great sacrifices were not made in vain.

On the Hayfield family vault in the Sutton Baptist burial ground was a beautiful laurel wreath, and also a splendid array of arum lilies.

13 October 1916

SUTTON – THE ROLL OF HONOUR

Writing in the Parish Magazine on the war, the Vicar of Sutton (Rev. A.R. Light) gives a list of men from the Parish of Sutton, who have fallen in defence of their country as follows:–Arnold Healey, Walter Haggas, Lyall Taylor, Edmund Wilkinson, Norman Riley, Nelson W. Petty, Richard Whitehall, Albert Wm. Tune, Frederick W. Thompson, Henry Taylor, Joseph G. Bancroft, Cedric Fawcett Horsfall.
Mr. Light also says: “I have not in the Magazine mentioned by name those from this place who have given their lives for their country, not because I have forgotten such promising young men as Henry Taylor, and others whose names hang in the Church porch, and, indeed, as I write this, I fear lest it may even be dimly thought that one may seem to be valued more than another. All who are fighting are equally dear to God, and it is also true to say that both rich and poor are giving their best, offering on an altar watered with tears those whose lives are so much to them. All those boys who formed our first patrol of Scouts have almost gone to the front, and only last week we heard of Reginald Ellison being wounded, but we hope his life will yet be spared.

To every mother whose heart aches with anxiety or for actual loss, I offer most true sympathy, whether such are connected with us in the worship of Sutton Church or not, and one cannot help feeling in such times as these that religious differences are not, and cannot be again, as great and as dividing as they have seemed in the past, and that all are one family of God. May each one of these, who will never enter into our lives here again, rest in peace.”

09 February 1917

CROSSHILLS – THE LATE CAPTAIN CEDRIC HORSFALL

Captain Cedric Fawcett Horsfall, of Hayfield, Crosshills, elder son of Sir John Horsfall, Bart, and Lady Horsfall, late of the West Riding Regiment, formerly in partnership with his father at Hayfield Mills, Glusburn, worsted manufacturer, left £24,956, nett personally being £22,847. The testator gives his personal effects to his brother, £200 to Norman Dixon Walker, £500, the household effects, and during widowhood £1,000 a year to his wife, or an annuity of £500 should she re-marry; and the residue of the property to his children, each son to take 2d and each daughter 1d.

04 July 1919

PEACE SUPPLEMENT TO THE 'CRAVEN HERALD' – CRAVEN'S FALLEN OFFICERS

CAPTAIN CEDRIC HORSFALL

6th Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, eldest son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, Hayfield, Glusburn, killed in action in France September 18th, 1916, aged 26 years.

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

View West Yorkshire Pioneer Articles

West Yorkshire Pioneer Logo

07 August 1914

CROSSHILLS – TERRITORIALS CALLED UP

The calling up of the Territorial for garrison duty, and who left their homes on Tuesday evening last for Skipton, made somewhat a stir in the district. Although crowds collected in the streets of Crosshills and others followed to the station, yet there was no outburst of the war spirit. The crowd at Kildwick Station gave them a hearty send off, but tears were noticeable on some of the faces, and anxiety was written on their countenances. Several Reservists have also been called up, and in most cases wives and families are left behind. Dr. Ward has left for Dover for medical service. It is also reported that young women in the district have offered themselves as nurses to take the place of others who have left for the coast. Captain Bateman and Lieutenant Chaffers, both of whom are heads of the firm of T. and M. Bairstow’s, Sutton Mill, have left for duty with their battalions. Lieutenant Horsfall, of Glusburn, and Mr. Cedric Horsfall, sons of Sir John Horsfall, have also to go with their respective Territorial battalions, Lieut. Horsfall with the Skipton, and Mr. Cedric with the Cambridge Territorials.

14 August 1914

100 RECRUITS SENT TO GRIMSBY

At 2-12 on Wednesday about 100 recruits from the Skipton Drill Hall proceeded to Grimsby. A considerable crowd foregathered at the Midland Station to witness their departure, and much cheering and handkerchief waving was indulged in. Major Case was in charge of the contingent, and the other officers accompanying were Lieut. Cedric F. Horsfall and Capt. A.E. Booth (who commands the 6th West Riding Cadet Battalion). Among those on the platform were Sir John and Lady Horsfall. There was a large number of the female sex present.

17 September 1915

LIEUT. C.F. HORSFALL WOUNDED

Sir John and Lady Horsfall received information on Wednesday morning by letter from their son, Lieut. Cedric F. Horsfall, of the 6th Duke of Wellington’s, stating that he was in hospital suffering from a bullet wound in the jaw. It is understood that the wound was caused by the bullet rebounding from some object. Lieut. Horsfall does not regard the wound as serious, although it will mean a week or two in the hospital. Lieut. Horsfall paid a visit home during the first week of September, returning to France on the 6th. He was wounded while in the trenches on Monday morning, the 13th. Many reports have reached the district that he is very popular with his men, and it is hoped he will soon be able to resume his duties.

29 October 1915

LIEUT. C.F. HORSFALL WOUNDED

News has been received by Sir John and Lady Horsfall that their son, Lieut. C.F. Horsfall, has again been wounded. The wounds, which were caused by a spent splintered bullet, are not regarded as serious, being flesh wounds on the back, numbering between 20 and 30. He is at present in the Duchess of Westminster’s Hospital (Boulogne).

26 November 1915

MARRIAGE OF LIEUT. CEDRIC HORSFALL

The marriage took place on Wednesday at the Parish Church, Buxton, of Lieut. Cedric Fawcett Horsfall, elder son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, of Hayfield, Glusburn, to Miss Doris May Sutcliffe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. Sutcliffe, of ‘Pendle’, Buxton, formerly of Manchester and Southport.

News of the wedding, or rather its proximity, came with surprising suddenness during last weekend to the inhabitants of Glusburn and the surrounding district, for although news of Mr. Cedric Horsfall’s recent engagement had prepared local people for a popular event in the ordinary course of things, existing circumstances were such as would hardly point to its immediate fulfilment. It was barely a month since news was received that the gallant bridegroom, who holds the commission of Lieutenant in the 6th West Riding (Duke of Wellington’s) Regiment, had been wounded for the second time, and whilst the wounds were not to be regarded as very serious, they were considered as likely to detain him in England for a lengthy period. At any rate, Lieut. Horsfall had been granted six weeks’ leave of absence from his battalion, and we believe it was owing to this fact, and because his incapacity was not such as to impede him or restrict his movements, that the event which has afforded much rejoicing in the neighbourhood was decided upon.

In a social capacity, Lieutenant Horsfall is held in very high regard. His sincerity and cordial good nature, his anxiety to promote the best interests of all around him – in which he is a worthy son of a worthy sire – and his enthusiasm for any cause which appeals to his broad sympathies has gained for him a wide popularity and esteem. In political life he has not been neglectful of the responsibilities which may fall to him. His advent to the Liberal faith was as chairman of the Skipton branch of the Young Liberal’s League, in which office he has not only proved his political capacity and democratic instincts, but has also exhibited a warm yearning for knowledge of those things likely to assist the common weal. He was also vice president of the Crosshills Literary Club, and a member of the Sutton and Glusburn Liberal Association. He has also taken a great interest in the Glusburn Technical Institute, and acted as president of the Young Men’s Bible Class connected with the Baptist Mission Hall Sunday School. Among the workpeople of Hayfield Mills, in which important and extensive business Lieut. Horsfall is a partner, it is not too much to say that he is beloved, and that when in his patriotism and loyalty he offered himself for King and Country on the outbreak of war, their admiration for his courage and characteristic spontaneity for a good cause was tampered with a natural anxiety. This has not been allayed – we feel bound to refer to it – by the repeated occasion of his wounds on active service, and it is hoped on every hand with remarkable fervour that the time is not far distant when he and his bride may take up their abode locally in times of piping peace.

AT THE CHURCH

The church had been beautifully adorned with flowers and foliage, forming a delightful setting for the happy event. Canon Wm. Scott Moncrieff, M.A., Vicar of Buxton Parish Church, performed the ceremony, which, although it was not entirely shorn of festivity, was essentially denuded of much of the happy display which would have marked it in normal circumstances. The bridegroom wore his service khaki and the bride presented a charming appearance in a dress of blue and grey Bengaline silk, trimmed with skunk, with a black picture hat to match. She had as bridesmaid the bridegroom’s sister, Miss Kathleen Horsfall, who wore a dress of brown velvet with gold embroidery and skunk, with hat to match. Lady Horsfall’s dress was a becoming one of wine-coloured moiré, trimmed with black and gold, with a black velvet hat, and the bride’s mother was handsomely attired in a grey dress with blue trimmings. The immediate relatives, in addition to the newly-wed couple, who were present were: Miss Horsfall, Miss Kathleen Horsfall, Miss Dora Horsfall, Capt. and Mrs. J. Donald Horsfall, Mr. and Mrs. N. D. Walker, and Miss Helen and Miss Maisie Walker (Steeton), Mr. and Mrs. Sutcliffe, Mr. and Mrs. F. Patchett (Halifax), and Mrs. Skelton (Southport). There was, of course, a large congregation of friends and spectators. After the tying of the nuptial knot, the officiating minister gave a short address to the bride and bridegroom at the alter steps. As the bridal party left the church they were met by a group of officers from Clipstone Camp, where the 3/6th Battalion (Duke of Wellington’s) West Riding Regiment is in training, viz. Lieut.-Col. J. Birkbeck (commanding officer), Lieut. J. Birkbeck, Capt. and Adjutant B.R. Brown, Capt. W.B. Carson and Lieuts. Robinson, Jacques, Greaves, Clapham and Buxton. A guard of honour composed of thirty invalided soldiers belonging to Buxton, who carried various weapons and war implements, including swords, dummy rifles, pickaxes, shovels, etc.!

Breakfast was afterwards served at the Old Hal Hotel, Buxton.

The honeymoon is being spent in Cornwall.

A handsome oak-case hall clock and two cases of silver-mounted pipes were wedding gifts to the bridegroom from the workpeople of Hayfield Mills; the office staff’s gift was a pair of silver candlesticks, and the inside and outside staff gave a silver egg stand. Quite apart from their intrinsic value the gifts were eloquent testimony to the bridegroom’s marked popularity among his father’s employees.

LIST OF PRESENTS

Bride to Bridegroom – Case of silver brushes
Bridegroom to Bride – Musquash and skunk coat and muff
Bride’s Father and Mother – Silver tea and coffee service
Bridegroom’s Father – Cheque
Bridegroom’s Mother – Canteen of silver cutlery
The Employees of Hayfield Mill – Oak chiming hall clock and pipes
The Office staff – Silver candlesticks
Indoor and Outdoor staff, Hayfield – Silver egg stand
Capt. and Mrs. J.D. Horsfall – Cheque
Miss Horsfall – Standard lamp and picture
Miss A.D. Horsfall – Silver salvers
Miss K.A. Horsfall – Cut table glass
Mr. and Mrs. N.D. Walker – Dinner and breakfast service
Brian, Eric, Maisie and Helen – China tea service
Mrs. Fawcett – Fish knives and forks
Mr. and Mrs. Crabtree – Silver cake dish
Mr. F. Patchett – Fitted suitcase
Mrs. F. Patchett – Cheque
Mrs. Skelton and Mr. Thompson – Silver afternoon tea service
Mr. John Fawcett – Silver toast rack
Miss Sutcliffe – Cheque
Miss Townsend – Cheque
Miss Sagar – Silver photo frame
Mr. and Mrs. Sagar – Card tray
Mr and Mrs. Crewdson – Muffineer
Mrs. Hill – Serviette rings
Mrs. and Miss Hill – Antique sugar sifter
Mr. and Mrs. Spencer – Silver mounted coffee cups
Mr. and Mrs. Petty – Dessert knives and forks
Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Clough – Silver saltcellars
Mr. and Mrs. Clough and Lieut. S.H. Clough – Ivory elephants
Mr. and Mrs. Matthews – Wedgwood bowl
Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin – Silver saltcellars
Mr. Wm. Clough, M.P., Mrs. Clough and Family – Silver candlesticks
Mr. and Mrs. E.G. Spencer – Silver toast racks
Sir John Clough and Family – Antique silver cup with carver
Mr. and Mrs. C. Sugden – Cut glass vases
Mr. and Mrs. E. Naylor – Cut glass bowl
Mr. and Mrs. Alf Smith – Antique silver tray
Lieut. F. Sugden Smith – Cut glass vase
The Misses Hattersley – Nankin vase
Mr. and Mrs. Clarkson and Dr. and Mrs. Weeks – Silver cigarette box
Mr. and Mrs. T.H. Haggas – Piece of furniture
Mr. and Mrs. T. Spencer – Silver bon-bon dish
Major and Mrs. Bateman – Entrée dishes
Mr. Robert Green – Barometer
Miss Parker – Sweet bottle
Lieut. Col. Birkbeck – Silver salver
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clough – Afternoon teaspoons
Mr. T.B. Clapham – Silver cigarette box
Mr. J.F. Greenwood – Cheque
Mr. and Mrs. Percy Clough – Silver coffee pot
Mrs. and Miss Tetley – Silver agaulle box
Mr. and Mrs. James – Silver clock
Dr. and Mrs. R. Marriner – Antique glass jug
Lieut. A. Pollard – Engraving
Rev. W.E. Blomfield – Books
Few Old Comrades – Double emergency rations
Pte. C.E. and Mrs. Whiteoak – Brass cigar ash bowl
Mrs. Edwin White – Inlaid mahogany tray
Mr. and Mrs. Mann – Silver bon-bon dish
The Misses Marmon – Brussels lace handkerchief
Mr. and Mrs. Smethurst – Silver sugar castor
Miss I. Smethurst – Silver toast rack
The Hon. and Mrs. Holland – Scent bottles
Mr. and Mrs. Ainsworth – Silver vase
Miss Townsend – Cheque
Mr. and Mrs. Grey Hammersley-Lummons – Clock
Mrs. Wilcox – Irish lace handkerchief
The Misses Storey – Silver purse
Mr. and Mrs. S. Simpson – Silver bon-bon dishes
Miss Evans – Old Sheffield plate suffers and dish
Miss Longbottom – Nightdress case
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Sutcliffe – Silver sauceboats
Mr. and Mrs. T.H. Whitehead – Teaspoons and tongs
Miss Smethurst – Tablecloth
Mr. and Mrs. Whittaker – Tablecloth
Mr. and Mrs. Alf Whitley – Cake stand
Miss Cookson – Travelling jewel case
Miss Robinson – Silver photo frame
Mr. and Mrs. E. Brecken – Clock
Mrs. Thompson – Pepperettes and mustard
Misses and Miss Thompson – Silver trinket box and silver fruit dish
Miss Bennett – Lace handkerchief
Mr. and Mrs. L. Sutcliffe – Dessert d’oyleys
Dr. and Mrs. Farr – Cut glass vase
Mr. and Mrs. H. Haggas and Family – Silver dish
Mr. and Mrs. H.S. Clough – Silver spoons
Mr. and Mrs. Alf Hargreaves – Silver photo fame
Mrs. Aldis – Prayer Book

22 September 1916

CAPTAIN CEDRIC HORSFALL KILLED

Yesterday, Sir John and Lady Horsfall received news that their son and heir, Captain Cedric Fawcett Horsfall, had been killed in action in France. No further details are to hand. Needless to say the sad intelligence was received with deep regret in the Glusburn district, where ‘Mr. Cedric’, as the deceased was affectionately called, was held in the highest esteem.

When war broke out, Capt. Horsfall had, comparatively speaking, only recently left the University, where he gained his B.A. degree, and only a few short years before he had attained his majority. When the call came he at once offered his services and joined the Duke of Wellington’s, of which his brother, Mr. Donald, was already an officer. In due time he went to the Front, and was twice wounded. In November last, while at home, and after being wounded, he married Miss Doris May Sutcliffe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. Sutcliffe of ‘Pendle’, Buxton. The greatest sympathy will be extended to the young widow and to Sir John and Lady Horsfall and family in their great loss.

Capt. Cedric Horsfall was a man of whom much was expected in the future. Although young in years he had, when war broke out, begun to take an active part in local affairs, and had to a great extent shouldered some of the commercial responsibilities of his father. Almost as soon as he returned home from University he was pressed into political work, and as president of the Skipton branch of the League of Young Liberals, he presided at that memorable meeting in the Skipton Skating Rink, at which Mr. Birrell was the chief speaker. In religious and social work too, he entered heartily, and in many walks of life he will be greatly missed.

Yet another life of great promise has been laid low by this terrible war

29 September 1916

HORSFALL – Killed in action, September 18th, 1916, aged 26 years, Captain Cedric Fawcett Horsfall, Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, elder son of Sir John and Lady Horsfall, Hayfield, Crosshills, Keighley, and dear husband of Doris May Horsfall.

29 September 1916

THE LATE CAPTAIN CEDRIC HORSFALL

Prior to commencement of the ordinary business of the Skipton Petty Sessions on Saturday last, the chairman (Mr. J. W. Morkill) said he felt he was expressing the feelings of everyone in the town of Skipton and neighbourhood, when he said that the news of the death of Captain Cedric Horsfall, which had been announced the previous evening, had been received with profound regret and sorrow. Captain Horsfall was a man who at the University had a distinguished career. He came back from the University to his home and there took an interest in the welfare of the people in the neighbourhood. He took a keen interest in the Boy Scout movement, with which the name of Anthony Slingsby was so closely associated. He then went at the call of his country to France. It was only the previous day that he happened to meet Colonel Birkbeck, who was Captain Horsfall’s commanding officer for many months in France, and neither of them knew at the time that Captain Horsfall had been killed. Colonel Birkbeck was loud in his praise of Captain Horsfall, and he described him as a valiant soldier, a man of resource, and a levelheaded man who could be thoroughly trusted. Such a man, continued Mr. Morkill, could ill be spared, but they could say of him that he died as he lived, an honourable English gentleman. His father, Sir John Horsfall, they all knew as a gentleman holding a leading position in the county and in the neighbourhood, and as one who held the position of senior member of the Bench. They desired to give expression to the sympathy they felt with Sir John and Lady Horsfall, and especially the young widow.

06 October 1916

SUTTON MILL

WOUNDED SOLDIER – Mr. Robert Chapman, of King Edward Street, has received information that his youngest son, Private Eddie Chapman, of the Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment, has been wounded and is now in hospital in Kent. He writes home saying “Captain Horsfall had only been our officer a week when he was killed.” Private Eddie Chapman is the youngest of five brothers, Robert is serving at Salonika, and two brothers, Will and Jim, are shortly to join up and then four out of five will be serving.

06 October 1916

SUTTON – THE LATE CAPTAIN CEDRIC HORSFALL

Impressive Memorial Service

On Sunday morning last a memorial service to the late Captain Cedric F. Horsfall, who was killed in action on September 18th, and to others in the district who have made the supreme sacrifice, was held in the Sutton Baptist Church. The service, which was largely attended, was impressive, reverent and beautiful in its simplicity. The service was conducted by the pastor, Rev. F.W. Pollard, whose message was couched in terms of profound sympathy, yet full of glorious hope for a great reunion with the departed heroes. In the large and reverent congregation were Sir John and Lady Horsfall and family, Sir Swire Smith, M.P., the Mayor of Keighley (wearing his mayoral chain), Mr. J. J. Brigg, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Petty (Lingstead), Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Wilson, Mr. James Woodrow, Mr. Edgar Naylor, Mr. Thomas Spencer, Mr. Robert Laycock, Mr. Arthur Smith, Mr. Foster (Liberal agent, Keighley), Dr. Calthorp, Dr. Curry, Dr. and Mrs. Marriner, Major C. P Cass, Captain M. Wright, Capt. T.K. Wright, the mill office staff, villagers, and many of the workpeople who were present at the 21st birthday celebration when the late Captain Horsfall made his memorable address to the large gathering of workpeople, etc., in the marquee specially erected for the occasion. On that occasion he referred to his great love of home, of the village of his birth, and of his great pride and joy at living amongst his own people. The last mark of affection shown by the workpeople was on the occasion of his marriage on November 24th 1915, when a beautiful clock was presented to him, a gift which was greatly appreciated and highly valued by himself and wife and whole family. The workpeople realise the great loss that has befallen the firm and the district.

THE SERVICE

The service was opened with the beautiful hymn ‘O God our help in ages past’. Other hymns reverently joined in by the great congregation were ‘God moves in a mysterious way’, ‘Ten thousand times, ten thousand’, and ‘For all the saints’. The choir gave the anthem, with great feeling, ‘There is a land’. The lessons were John 14th chapter, and part of the 7th chapter of Revelations. The text was taken from Matthew xxvi, and the book of Revelations xxiii, from the third verse, ‘He that overcometh inheriteth all things. I will be God and he shall be my son’, and ‘To what purpose all this waste’.

In opening his discourse, Mr. Pollard said:– It is nearly a year since we held our memorial service for Joseph Bancroft, treasurer to our young men’s bible class, who was killed on the 23rd of October 1915. Since then Fred Simpson and Walter Haggas have been reported missing, of whom no further news has yet been received concerning their fate. Percy Stell, who was engaged in the Gallipoli campaign, is also reported missing, and his comrade Stanley Archibald, who went through the same campaign, and was transferred to France, is also reported missing. Tom Summerskill, who attended our Junior Endeavour and Band of Hope, was killed in July last. Now the awful shadow of death again rests upon us, and we are realising how terrible are the sacrifices this war is demanding from us, when the many splendid lives passing into the unseen world and the flower of manhood is being destroyed upon the battlefield. Like the disciples of Christ we may ask: ‘To what purpose all this waste?’ As we stand amid the desolation of war, the glory of it seems to us a mockery and a cheat.

THE FATEFUL WEEK

We were shocked as we thought of the gloom that had befallen the household of the Prime Minister, Raymond Asquith. The son of one of our most gifted men, whose intellectual gifts had given promise of filling a great part in the national life, had fallen in battle. On the Tuesday morning came the news that Captain Henderson, son of the Right Hon. Arthur Henderson, who was following in his father’s footsteps and gave promise of leadership, he too had made the great sacrifice. We also read of the death of the son of the Right Hon. Pike Pease. How tragic are these losses? We were touched very deeply when we received the news of the death of our dear friend, Captain Horsfall. He was worthy to take his place with the best of those who have fallen, by virtue of his noble character and the rich promise of his life. We speak today of a personal loss, we have known him from his childhood and have watched his career. There was earnestness in his character, and we marked him out for future service in this neighbourhood and the county. We think of his honourable achievements at school, and how they were crowned by his winning the highest honours at the University of Cambridge, honours which he held with beautiful modesty. We have lost in him a true gentleman, courteous, kindly and considerate for others. Those of you who have read the reference to his brief career will know how his consideration for the soldiers awakened their love for, and complete trust in him, how he considered them in their toil and duties of life, helping them to carry their burdens and cheered them when cast down. Captain Horsfall’s earnest decision for Christ at the close of last year, and the manly discipleship which he made in this place on the first Sunday of this year impressed us all with great hopes of usefulness in connection with this church. But he too has made the supreme sacrifice, and has given his life for us and the land he loved.

NOT OUR ONLY SORROW TODAY

We mourn the loss of two others, whose names were on the Glusburn Roll of Honour. Lewis Binns was killed in action on September 15th. He leaves a widow, son and daughter. It is a rich consolation to them in this their hour of sadness to receive such a beautiful letter from one of his leaders. Albert Binns has died from wounds received in battle. He passed through the school at Glusburn. We rejoice that his sisters were privileged to be with him in his last hours, to comfort and to cheer. Again might we ask, ‘To what purpose all this waste?’ But our answer is, they have fallen in defence of their country, of honourable ideals, of freedom and justice, honour and truth. We entered this great fight to keep the law of Europe. To see that treaties were honourably kept. We stand for the right of small nations to live their lives in their own way, and for the subjugation of the military caste which has kept Europe for the last twenty years in a state of ferment. These men who have fallen were men of peace, but they realised that there were things in this world which it was worthwhile to sacrifice their lives for. Captain Horsfall volunteered early in the war. There were many reasons why he might have declined the call. Home and business considerations, considerations for the future of this locality, but his noble spirit constrained him to make the greater choice. The great need in this time of the nation’s agony is for us to see that the sacrifice is not in vain. We must be better men and women, we must cherish nobler ideals. When such lives are being poured out for our sakes, what manner of person should we be; may we be a gold that is purified, though it be purified by fire?

The service closed with the Dead March in ‘Saul’ being played on the organ by Mr. Joseph Petty.

10 November 1916

SUTTON – MEMORIAL SERVICE AND CHURCH PARADE

On Sunday morning a memorial service to those who had fallen during the war from Sutton parish was held in St. Thomas’s Church, conducted by Rev. A.R. Light (vicar). About 60 members of the local Volunteer Corps were present, having met in the Friendly Societies’ Hall yard, under the leadership of Commander Clough. Special lessons were read and special psalms were sung. ‘O rest in the Lord’ was given on the organ by Mr. A.E. Foulds. The Vicar asked the congregation to offer prayers for the souls of those who had fallen. The following names were read out:– Privates Arnold Healey, F.W. Thompson, Walter Haggas, J.G. Bancroft, Evelyn Fisher, Tom Summerskill, Norman Riley, Henry Taylor, Lyall Taylor, R. Whitehall, E. Wilkinson, A.W. Tune, Lieut. Nelson Petty, and Capt. C.F. Horsfall.

The text from which the very sympathetic discourse was preached was 2nd Samuel, 1., 26, David’s lamentation over the death of his friend Jonathan. At the close of the very impressive service Chopin’s ‘Funeral March’ was given on the organ. At the close of the evening service, which was again conducted by the Vicar, the ‘Dead March’ in ‘Saul’ was played, and the National Anthem sung.

09 February 1917

GLUSBURN – WILL OF CAPTAIN CEDRIC F. HORSFALL

The late Captain Cedric F. Horsfall, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, of Hayfield, Crosshills, worsted spinner (elder son of Sir John C. Horsfall), who was killed in action, left estate of the value of £24,956, the net personalty being £22,847. The testator gives his personal effects to his brother. £200 to Norman Dixon Walker; £500, the household effects, and during widowhood £1000 a year to his wife, or an annuity of £500 should she re-marry; and the residue of the property to his children, each son to take 2d. and each daughter 1d.

03 August 1917

SUTTON

DEDICATION OF ROLL OF HONOUR – A special service, reverent and very beautiful throughout, the dedication of the roll of honour, was conducted in St. Thomas’s Church on Sunday evening last by the vicar, Rev. A. R. Light. The roll of honour is a triptych, the top panel, a beautiful inlet picture representing ‘The Great Sacrifice.’ It contains the names of the fallen heroes, viz., Arnold Healey, F.W. Thompson, Norman Riley, Lyall Taylor, J.G. Bancroft, E. Wilkinson, Nelson Petty, W. Haggas, G. Sanderson, R. Whitehall, W. Hargreaves, T. Summerskill, A.W. Tune, C.F. Horsfall, Lewis Binns,Albert Binns, E. Fisher, and W. Blake Spencer. The left panel represents ‘The White Comrade,’ and the right ‘The watch on many waters,’ in very artistic colours. The large centre space contains the names of all who were residents in the Sutton parish and are still serving their King and country. The sermon was from the text, “Through God we shall do valiantly.” The large congregation left the church to the strains of the French National Anthem.

Submit a Correction

    Name (required)

    Email Address (required)

    Telephone (required)

    Soldier Reference - Name:

    Soldier Reference - URL:

    Details of the correction to be made (required)

    Comment on this Soldier Record

    You can leave comments on this soldier record. Please note all comments will be manually approved before they appear on the website.

    One Response to Cedric Fawcett HORSFALL

    1. Warren Osborne September 14, 2016 at 9:40 am #

      War diary entry for Captain Horsfall, 18th, Sept. Enemy artillery was very active all night and their 5.9″ were firing all the time. Our patrols were active & and got in touch with 6th Border Regt on our right. Captain C F Horsfall O.C. ‘D’ coy was killed by shrapnel 12.15am whilst supervising new trench running from our right towards the Borders. Captain Horsfall was my relations (Pte Thomas Lemon) O.C. Thomas had been KIA approx. 6 hours earlier on 17th September along with 4 others, all are now buried in Lonsdale cemetery.

    Leave a Reply

    Pin It on Pinterest

    Share This