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John Edward PICKUP

Main CPGW Record

Surname: PICKUP

Forename(s): John Edward

Place of Birth: Burnley, Lancashire

Service No: 266122

Rank: Private

Regiment / Corps / Service: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion / Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1917-03-29

Awards: D.C.M.

CWGC Grave / Memorial Reference: IV. F. 5.

CWGC Cemetery: ST. VAAST POST MILITARY CEMETERY, RICHEBOURGE-L’AVOUE

CWGC Memorial: ---

Non-CWGC Burial: ---

Local War Memorial: BARNOLDSWICK, YORKSHIRE

Additional Information:

John Edward Pickup was the son of James and Elizabeth Ann Pickup, née Whitworth and brother of Private Herbert Pickup (45355) (q.v.). Their father was born at Haslingden and mother at Bacup, Lancashire.

1901 Leeds, Yorkshire Census: 78, York Road also 2, Pontefract Lane - John E. Pickup, aged 8 years, born Burnley, Yorkshire, son of James and Elizabeth A. Pickup.

1911 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: Cherry Dene, Rostle Top Road - John Ed. Pickup, aged 18 years, born Burnley, Lancashire, son of James and Elizabeth A. Pickup.

John is listed in the Nominal Roll of the 1/6th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment): Pte J. E. Pickup.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte John E. Pickup, 3360; 266122, W. Rid. R. Theatre of War first served in: (1) France. Date of entry therein: 14.4.15. K. in A. 23.9.17 [sic].

British Army WW1 Medal and Award Rolls: Pte John Edward Pickup, 266122, 1/6 W. Rid. R. K. in A. 29.3.17.

Army Registers of Soldiers' Effects: Pte John Edward Pickup, 3360, 1/6th Bn W. Riding Regt. Date and Place of Death: 29.3.17. In Action. To whom Authorised/Amount Authorised: Father - James. £38 7s. 2d.

UK, WW1 Pension Ledgers and Index Cards, 1914-1923: card(s) exist for John.

A short biography of John is included in: ‘Barnoldswick - A small Town’s part in conflicts 1800 to 2014’ by Peter Ian Thompson (2014).

See also: ‘Guiseley Terriers: A Small Part in The Great War - A History of the 1/6th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding) Regiment’ by Stephen Barber (2018).

Data Source: Craven’s Part in the Great War - original CPGW book entry

View Entry in CPGW Book

Entry in West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record:

PICKUP, John Edward, D.C.M., aged 24 years, West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry House, [Barnoldswick], killed in France Mar. 25, 1917.

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Private John Edward PICKUP

Private John Edward PICKUP

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Regiment / Corps / Service Badge: Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Divisional Sign / Service Insignia: 49th (West Riding) Division

Data from Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914 - 1919 Records

Soldiers Died Data for Soldier Records

Surname: PICKUP

Forename(s): John Edward

Born:

Residence:

Enlisted: Barnoldswick, Yorks

Number: 3360

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 1/6th Battalion

Decorations: D.C.M.

Died Date: 29/03/17

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

CWGC Data for Soldier Records

Surname: PICKUP

Forename(s): J E

Country of Service: United Kingdom

Service Number: 266122

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 1st/6th Bn.

Age:

Awards: D C M

Died Date: 29/03/1917

Additional Information:

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Citations of the Distinguished Conduct Medal, 1914-1920

3360 Pte J.E. Pickup, W. Rid. R. (LG 14 Nov. 1916).

For conspicuous gallantry as a stretcher bearer during operations. He has shown the greatest pluck and disregard of danger when repeatedly tending the wounded under heavy shell fire.

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20 October 1916

BARNOLDSWICK’S FIFTH D.C.M.

News is to hand that Pte. John Edward Pickup, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene, Barnoldswick, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Pte. Pickup, who is 23 years of age, went out with the Duke of Wellington’s in April 1915 as a stretcher-bearer, and is the third Barnoldswick stretcher-bearer to earn that distinction, the others being Sergeant P.H. Garratt and Pte. Fred Bracewell. Two other Barlickers in the same regiment who were awarded the D.C.M. were Co.-Sergt.-Major Green (since killed) and Sergeant James Bury.

In a letter acquainting his parents of the fact, Pte. Pickup says:– “I have just been presented with the D.C.M. ribbon, and I shall be receiving the medal very likely before long.”

Before joining the Army he worked as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.’s, Long Ing.

29 December 1916

BARNOLDSWICK – HONOURING A D.C.M. WINNER

A pleasing touch of variety was given to the annual Christmas gathering in connection with the Wesleyan Sunday School on Monday evening by the presentation of a wristlet watch with luminous dial to Sergt. James Bury, an old scholar, in recognition of his winning the D.C.M. Mr. R. Kendall presided over a large attendance.

In making the presentation the Rev. A. Bradfield said they all felt proud of the boys who had belonged to their Sunday School who had shown themselves possessed of qualities little suspected. While they remained at home their parents and friends valued them greatly, but now the country had begun to show its appreciation of their noble service. He felt proud to be associated with a Sunday School which had four D.C.M. winners amongst its old boys (applause) – Pte. Bracewell, Sergt. Garratt, Sergt. Bury, and Pte. Pickup. The three first named had all now been similarly honoured, and they were anxiously awaiting the home coming of Pte. Pickup in order to make a presentation to him also.
Segt. Bury made a neat little speech in response, modestly asserting that there were hundreds of his pals who had deserved the honour equally with himself.

Songs, &c., were rendered during the evening by Miss N. Simpson, Mr. E. Lambert, Mr. J. Horsfield, and Mr. Duckworth.

Mr. T. Bracewell (secretary) gave an encouraging report of the progress of the school, which has now a total roll of 500 in the three departments.

13 April 1917

PICKUP – March 29th 1917, killed in action in France, Pte. John Edward Pickup, D.C.M., Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, aged 24 years.

13 April 1917

BARNOLDSWICK D.C.M. WINNER KILLED IN ACTION

Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, yesterday received a letter from Captain Ogston, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, confirming the report of the death of their son, Private John Edward Pickup, a stretcher-bearer in the same Battalion, as having been killed in action on March 29th. The writer added:– “The reason for my not writing before was because he was missing for some little time, but was later found and buried in the English Cemetery. I cannot speak too highly of him; he was one of the best stretcher-bearers in the battalion and an excellent soldier. It may be some consolation to you to know that he suffered no pain.”

The circumstances of Pte. Pickup’s death are more fully described in the following letter (dated April lst) from Sergt. J. H. Whiteley, another Barlicker in the same battalion:– “As sergeant in charge of the stretcher bearers I feel it is my duty to let you know about Johnny. We had a bombing raid into the German trenches in the early morning of the 29th, and nine of us stretcher-bearers had to go with them. Johnny and another Barlicker went over with the first lot. He never came back, and I never saw him after he went over, but Jim Bury says he was close beside him when a shell came and killed him. I and some more S.B.’s searched all over but could not find the least trace of him, and parties have been out every night since, but without success. We cannot tell what has become of him. He may possibly be a prisoner, but I am afraid there is not much chance of that. We did our best to find him and I am very sorry we did not succeed, so that we could have given him a decent burial if killed. He was a favourite in the Battalion with both officers and men, and I feel certain he would have got something beside the D.C.M. if he had only pulled through. He had been with me at the Medical Aid Post for some time, and we were very good friends. I feel his loss keenly, but I know it will be a lot worse for you at home. All the lads from Barnoldswick send their sympathy. They all miss him, and would have done anything to save him. He was bringing in a wounded man when he was hit, and they are both missing. He was the best lad I had – always willing and cheerful and a hard worker – afraid of nothing, and was in rare spirits at the thought of going over the top. He met his death like a hero, I am certain, doing his duty nobly. He was a son to be proud of.”

Pte. Pickup was 24 years of age. He had been in France two years, and was awarded the D.C.M. in October last, being the fifth Barnoldswick man to win that distinction. Before enlisting he was employed as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.’s sheeting works. Three of his brothers are serving in France, one in Ireland, and the other in the Navy.

27 April 1917

BARNOLDSWICK – MEMORIAL SERVICE

A very impressive memorial service for the late Pte. John Edward Pickup, a stretcher-bearer of the Duke of Wellington’s, whose death was recorded in our columns a fortnight ago, was held at the Wesleyan Church on Sunday morning. There was a large congregation, including some 50 members of the Barnoldswick Ambulance and Nursing Divisions, with which the deceased was formerly connected. These had marched from the Drill Hall in command of Supt. J.W. Thompson. Before commencing his sermon, the Rev. W. Bradfield, M.A., B.D., said:– “In the midst of our rejoicing this morning, we remember one of our young men who went out from amongst us and has now been called hence. – Pte. John Edward Pickup, a stretcher bearer in the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who has behaved himself with conspicuous gallantry and has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He was afterwards striving to do his duty bravely and devotedly to help his comrades when in the midst of it his course was ended on March 20th. He was only 24 years of age, and in thus trying to render assistance to those who had been injured in this great struggle he himself was called away. Words fail me when I speak of things like this. We leave him in the hands of God, but to his father and mother and all the rest of the family in their great sorrow we tender our most heartfelt sympathy, and whilst I say this I also want to add that there is another of our young men, Pte. J.A. Plumbley, Duke of Wellington’s, aged 22, who is reported missing. You know the terribly deep agony and suspense that that word conveys. To his parents also our hearts go out in deepest sympathy.”

The hymn ‘Now the labourer’s task is o’er’ was then sung, and at the close the organist (Mr. C.L. Waller) played the ‘Dead March’.

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20 November 1914

A RECRUITING SCOOP

A recruiting ‘scoop’ was made by the 6th Battalion West Riding Regiment when they persuaded a number of Barnoldswick men, who were connected with the St. John Ambulance Division, to join the ranks as a Bearer Company. Some of these men were viewed as prospective valuable additions to the complement of the Royal Naval Sick Berth Reserve, but the Army ‘got there’ first. The Bearer Company includes the following local men:– Sergt. P.H. Garnett, and Privates R.W.W. Collyer, J.W. Smith, George Harwood, George Harrison, F. Barker. J.E. Pickup, E. Schofield, W. Strickland, R. Harrison. E. Woodhead, S. Lee, F. Bracewell, J.H. Holden, J. Pickup. J.H. Whitley, and H. Thomas. Other men who have joined the Army this week are R. Metcalfe, W.J. Shuttleworth, and H. Blackburn.

20 October 1916

BARNOLDSWICK – ‘BARLICKS’ FIFTH D.C.M.

News is to hand that Private John Edward Pickup, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene, Barnoldswick, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Private Pickup, who is 23 years of age, went out with the Duke of Wellington’s in April 1915 as a stretcher-bearer, and is the third Barnoldswick stretcher-bearer to earn that distinction, the others being Sergeant P.H. Garratt and Private Fred Bracewell. Two other Barlickers in the ‘Duke’s’ who were awarded the D.C.M. were Company-Sergeant-Major Green (since killed) and Sergeant James Bury.

In a letter acquainting his parents of the fact, Private Pickup says: “I have just been presented with the D.C.M. ribbon, and I shall be receiving the medal very likely before long.” Before joining the army he worked as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co., Long Ing.

13 April 1917

PICKUP – March 25th, in France, Pte. John Edward Pickup, D.C.M., of the West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, of Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, aged 24.

13 April 1917

BARNOLDSWICK D C.M. WINNER KILLED IN FRANCE

Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, yesterday received a letter from Captain Ogston, Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, confirming the report of the death of their son, Private John Ed. Pickup, a stretcher-bearer in the same battalion, as having been killed in action on March 29th. The writer added:– “The reason for my not writing before was because he was missing for some little time, but was later found and buried in the English cemetery. I cannot speak too highly of him; he was one of the best stretcher-bearers in the battalion and an excellent soldier. It may be some consolation to you to know that he suffered no pain.”

The circumstances of Private Pickup’s death are more fully described in the following letter (dated April lst) from Sergt. J.H. Whiteley, another ‘Barlicker’ in the same battalion:– “As sergeant in charge of the stretcher-bearers I feel it is my duty to let you know about Johnny. We had a bombing raid into the German trenches in the early morning of the 29th, and nine of us stretcher-bearers had to go with them. Johnny and another ‘Barlicker’ went over with the first lot. He never came back, and I never saw him after he went over, but Jim Bury says he was close beside him when a shell came and killed him. I and some more stretcher-bearers searched all over but could not find the least trace of him, and parties have been out every night since, but without success. We cannot tell what has become of him. He may possibly be a prisoner, but I am afraid there is not much chance of that. We did our best to find him, and I am very sorry we did not succeed, so that we could have given him a decent burial if killed. He was a favourite in the battalion with both officers and men, and I feel certain he would have got something beside the D.C.M. if he had only pulled through. He had been with me at the Medical Aid Post for some time, and we were very good friends. I feel his loss keenly, but I know it will be a lot worse for you at home. All the lads from Barnoldswick send their sympathy. They all miss him, and would have done anything to save him. He was bringing in a wounded man when he was hit, and they are both missing. He was the best lad I had – always willing and cheerful and a hard worker – afraid of nothing, and was in rare spirits at the thought of going over the top. He met his death like a hero, I am certain, doing his duty nobly. He was a son to be proud of.”

Pte. Pickup was 24 years of age. He had been in France two years, and was awarded the D.C.M. in October last, being the fifth Barnoldswick man to win that distinction. Before enlisting he was employed as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.’s sheeting works. Three of his brothers are serving in France, one in Ireland, and the other in the navy.

20 April 1917

HONOURS FOR BARNOLDSWICK STRETCHER-BEARERS

In a recent letter to his wife, Sergt. J.H. Whiteley, Duke of Wellington’s (S.B. Coy), writes:– “You will have seen by the papers that the luck is still with us. I have just heard that we have captured 8,000 at Vimy and 30 guns – and still going strong. It looks like being on the winning side now, doesn’t it? I can see visions of Blackpool or Douglas before the summer is over. Ben Pilkington and myself have got the Military Medal for that bombing raid when Johnny Pickup was killed. I am sending you my gallantry card to take care of. I was a bit surprised when the officer sent for me and congratulated me. There were five other officers present, and I had to sit down with them while they wished me luck and drunk my health. Of course, the other lads had done as much as I had, and I’m only sorry they didn’t all get something. I recommended some of them, and had no idea I had been recommended myself. It is all a matter of luck but I would rather have gone without anything to have Johnny back with us again. I am keeping all right; nothing to worry about; getting plenty to eat. Bert Wilkin is our cook, you know, and he makes some rare feeds, especially when we are out of the trenches. He is quite a nap hand at roly-poly puddings. I intend making a bit of a tea-party when we are out of the trenches again for all the stretcher-bearers who were with me that night.”

Sergt. Whiteley has been out in France two years. He had previously served in South Africa during the Boer war, and holds the Ambulance Medal for that campaign. He is a son of Mr. John Whiteley, tailor, Chapel Street, Barnoldswick.

27 April 1917

BARNOLDSWICK – MEMORIAL SERVICE

A very impressive memorial service for the late Pte. John Ed. Pickup, a stretcher-bearer of the Duke of Wellington’s, whose death was recorded in our columns a fortnight ago, was held at the Wesleyan Church on Sunday morning. There was a large congregation, including some 50 members of the Barnoldswick Ambulance and Nursing Divisions, with which the deceased was formerly connected. These had marched from the Drill Hall in command of Supt. J.W. Thompson. Before commencing his sermon, the Rev. W. Bradfield, M.A., B.D., said:– “In the midst of our rejoicing this morning, we remember one of our young men who went out from amongst us and has now been called hence – Pte. John Edward Pickup, a stretcher-bearer in the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who had behaved himself with conspicuous gallantry and has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He was afterwards striving to do his duty bravely and devotedly to help his comrades, when in the midst of it his course was ended on March 29th. He was only 24 years of age, and in thus trying to render assistance to those who had been injured in this great struggle he himself was called away. Words fail me when I speak of things like this. We leave him in the hands of God, but to his father and mother and all the rest of the family in their great sorrow we tender our most heartfelt sympathy. And whilst I say this I also want to add that there is another of our young men, Pte. J.A. Plumbley, of the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, aged 22, who is reported missing. You know the terribly deep agony and suspense that that word conveys. To his parents also our hearts go out in deepest sympathy.” The hymn ‘Now the labourer’s task is o’er’ was then sung, and at the close the organist (Mr. C.L. Waller) played the ‘Dead march.'

25 January 1918

BARNOLDSWICK

WESLEYAN ‘AT HOMES’ – INTERESTING PRESENTATION

These popular gatherings were held an Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings last week, and in spite of numerous counter attractions were accorded a fair amount of patronage. An interesting feature on the opening night was the presentation of a wristlet watch to Pte. Linnaeus Pilkington, a stretcher-bearer in the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, in recognition of his winning the Military Medal. Pte. Pilkington’s parents now reside at Nelson, but he attended the Wesleyan Sunday School for 12 years before leaving Barnoldswick and is on the ‘Roll of Honour.’ The Rev. A. Bradfield, (sup. minister), in the course of a few remarks said the conferment of the medal to Pte. Pilkington made the seventh distinction of its kind worn by former scholars. One of these (Sergt. J. Bury) had been awarded both the D.C.M. and the M.M., while the remainder were five stretcher-bearers all belonging to the same battalion, viz., Sergt. P.H. Garratt., Sergt. J. Whiteley, Pte. F. Bracewell (D.C.M). Pte. J.S. [J.E.] Pickup (killed). and Pte. Pilkington. The latter was loudly cheered on rising to receive the watch, which was buckled to his wrist by Mrs. J. Toft (who presided).

31 May 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Pte. H. Pickup, Barnoldswick

News was received yesterday (Thursday) morning, in a letter from a comrade, of the. death of Pte. Herbert Pickup. Highland Light Infantry, who was killed in action on Friday last (May 24th). He was 19 years of age, and the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene, Barnoldswick, whose other son, Pte. John Ed. Pickup, D.C.M., was killed earlier in the war.

07 June 1918

CRAVEN AND THE WAR

Pte. Herbert Pickup, Barnoldswick

Above is a portrait of Pte. Herbert Pickup, Highland Light Infantry, who (as briefly reported last week) was killed in France on May 24th, aged 19 years. This is the second bereavement of the war which has befallen Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene. Barnoldswick, elder son. Pte. John Edward Pickup, whose services as a stretcher-bearer in the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment won the Distinguished Conduct Medal, having been killed in March, 1917. Pte. Herbert Pickup enlisted in February, 1915, when only 16 years of age, in the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, and went out to the Dardanelles in the September following. After the evacuation he spent a short time in Egypt before going to France. After a statement by Mr. Tennant in the House of Commons his parents reclaimed him six months prior to attaining the age of 18, and he returned home. On being recalled to the colours he joined the Royal Scots at Edinboro’, and was transferred to the Highland Light Infantry on returning to France in March last.

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